gaming


AI and the next big esports boom for pro players, amateurs, and entrepreneurs

#artificialintelligence

Esports is a billion-dollar competitive video gaming phenomenon, and a booming market. Professional players are drawing larger and larger team salaries, while monetizing their fans on personal channels. Meanwhile, big brand sponsors are turning into team owners and traditional sports team franchises are launching their own esports teams. It's no surprise that, today, online audience numbers for esports are growing at an incredibly fast rate -- tech consulting firm Activate estimated that there were 270 million global fans of esports in 2016 and projected that number to grow to 495 million in 2020. Chinese tech giant Tencent, developer of the first mobile esports franchise, Honor of Kings, generated $66 million in media rights and $64 million in sponsorship deals in just the first half of 2019.


Common Applications of Artificial Intelligence That Are All Around Us

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is all around us – and yet, it can sometimes be hard to see the impact it has on our everyday lives. There are many things that would not be the same without AI, but sometimes it's not even obvious that it's the main driving force behind them. And this will likely keep getting more and more pronounced in the near future too. It's clear that AI is the next big thing in technology, and there are many reasons to believe that things will continue to move in this direction as well. It might seem like AI just arrived on the scene a decade or so ago, but the technology is actually not that new.



Is gaming more important than artificial intelligence?

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But are video games the most important technology of our time? The entrepreneur made his case in a TED Talk delivered earlier this year, now available online. Fast Company spoke with Narula on how gamers and games will change the world. Fast Company: The big idea of your TED Talk is that the most important tech change happening in the world right now lies in video games. Is it really as important as AI? Convince me.


AWS Announces NVIDIA GPU instances for it G4 Elastic Compute Cloud

#artificialintelligence

The News: Friday 20th September saw news out of Amazon Web Services (AWS) about a renewed (expanded) partnership with industry leading Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) manufacturer NVIDIA to offer improved GPU based cloud instances. The adoption of GPU technology has expanded from the use of these specialist processors for solely graphics acceleration to other commercial uses from everything from Blockchain mining to inference engines as part of Machine Learning applications. Analyst Take: This is an important announcement as we see best in class cloud services meet best in class machine learning capabilities bringing AI as a Service into the consumption model that continues to grow in favor. Let's unpack the news piece by piece. GPU powered Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances.


VENN Network aims to do for video games what MTV, ESPN has done for music and sports

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Fans of video games and esports may soon have their own media outlet à la MTV or ESPN. The Video Game Entertainment & News Network (VENN), set to debut next year with live studios in New York and Los Angeles, aims to be an online video home for esports and game culture. Expected to air 24 hours daily, VENN will be available as an app on streaming and mobile devices, and with channels on current video game and esports destinations such as Twitch and YouTube. VENN also plans to have a presence on live streaming services such as Sling, YouTube TV, Hulu and PlutoTV, as well as social networks such as Snapchat and TikTok. "We are creating a singular media brand at the nexus of Gaming, Entertainment, and the GenZ Millennial generations, across a highly fragmented video marketplace," said Ben Kusin, a video game veteran previously with Electronic Arts and Vivendi Games, who is co-CEO of the new venture with Ariel Horn, a former NBC Sports producer (winner of four Emmys) and Riot Games executive.


'This industry has a problem with abuse': dealing with gaming's #MeToo moment

The Guardian

Some say it is long overdue, some doubted victims would be ready to speak out, but now #MeToo has very much arrived in the video games industry. Last month, game developer Nathalie Lawhead posted to her website, accusing video game soundtrack composer Jeremy Soule of raping her while the two worked together at an unnamed Vancouver-based development studio. Soule has denied the accusation. Within days, another developer, Zoë Quinn, alleged on Twitter to have suffered abuse and harassment from Alec Holowka, co-creator of award-winning game, Night in the Woods. Holowka was found dead days after the allegations were made.


High-speed 5G network seen as ready to give big boost to online gaming

The Japan Times

CHIBA – At this year's Tokyo Game Show, the big draw was next-generation 5G networking -- setting pulses racing with the prospect of a radically more immersive gaming experience. Offering data transmission speeds around 100 times faster than 4G, 5G is expected to enable more seamless imagery -- particularly lower latency, more vivid images -- and sharper motion. Industry experts say it will dramatically improve the quality of augmented and virtual reality games. "It was very smooth, responsive and consistent," said Omar Alshiji, a 23-year-old game designer from Bahrain, after trying out the fighting game Tekken at the NTT Docomo Inc. booth. The major mobile carrier installed 5G base stations at its booth this year, making the high-speed network available at the show.


High-speed 5G network seen as ready to give big boost to online gaming

The Japan Times

CHIBA – Next-generation 5G networking was the big draw at Tokyo Game Show 2019, setting pulses racing with the prospect of a radically more immersive gaming experience. Offering data transmission speeds around 100 times faster than 4G, 5G is expected to enable more seamless imagery with lower latency, more vivid images and sharper motion. Industry experts say it will dramatically improve the quality of augmented and virtual reality games. "It was very smooth, responsive and consistent," said Omar Alshiji, a 23-year-old game designer from Bahrain, after trying out the fighting game "Tekken" at the NTT Docomo Inc. booth at the four-day game show in Chiba. The major mobile carrier installed 5G base stations at its booth this year, making the high-speed network available at the show.


Nintendo Switch changed my life. Apple Arcade may do the same

#artificialintelligence

The Nintendo Switch will likely be one of Apple Arcade's biggest competitors. I tap on the display, and tiny digital warriors and wizards storm the field, ready to attack an enemy base. Wizards blast through the walls, while my warriors rush in with swords at the ready. Within minutes, all that's left is rubble. It is, perhaps, for the first several dozen times.