food production


Our Cultural Need To Integrate Local Food Production And Artificial Intelligence

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Matt Barnard, chief executive officer and co-founder of Plenty Inc., speaks at the SoftBank World 2019 event in Tokyo, Japan, on Thursday 2019. Barnard said the company's high-tech approach to growing crops indoors results in plants that yield more without pesticides, use a fraction of water of their counterparts in the field and taste better, to boot. The use of AI (artificial intelligence) in agriculture is not new and has been around for some time with technology spans a wide range of abilities--from that which discriminates between crop seedlings and weeds to greenhouse automation. Indeed, it is easy to think that this is new technology given the way that our culture has distanced so many facets of food production, keeping it far away from urban spaces and our everyday reality. Yet, as our planet reaps the negative repercussions of technological and industrial growth, we must wonder if there are ways that our collective cultures might be able to embrace AI's use in food production which might include a social response to climate change.


Kitchen disruption on the horizon as tech firms add AI, big data to food production The Japan Times

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WASHINGTON – Looking for that perfect recipe, or a new flavor combination that delights the senses? Increasingly, players in the food industry are embracing artificial intelligence to better understand the dynamics of flavor, aroma and other factors that go into making a food product a success. Earlier this year, IBM became a surprise entrant to the food sector, announcing a partnership with seasonings maker McCormick to "explore flavor territories more quickly and efficiently using AI to learn and predict new flavor combinations" by utilizing data collected from millions of data points. The partnership highlights how technology is being used to disrupt the food industry by helping develop new products and respond to consumer preferences and offer improved nutrition and flavor. "More and more, food companies are embracing digitization and becoming data-driven," said Bernard Lahousse, co-founder of Foodpairing, a startup with offices in Belgium and New York that develops digital food "maps" and algorithms to recommend food and drink combinations.


The future of food: Why farming is moving indoors

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A car park opposite the infamous New York City housing estate where rapper Jay-Z grew up seems an unlikely place for an agricultural revolution. Ten shipping containers dominate a corner of the Brooklyn parking area, each full of climate control tech, growing herbs that are distributed to local stores on bicycles. This is urban farming at its most literal. The containers are owned by Square Roots, part of America's fast-expanding vertical farming industry, a sector run by many tech entrepreneurs who believe food production is ripe for disruption. The world's best basil reputedly comes from Genoa, Italy.


Artificial Intelligence Research by IDTechEx

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Researchers have figured out how to use deep learning to speed up the analysis of gas chromatographic data. Because this type of analysis is used in many parts of society, the new method will have a major impact on quality, efficiency and cost when examining various data -- from blood tests, to the fermentation of cheese. Gas chromatography is a method of analysis that most people have experienced at one time or another without necessarily knowing it. For example, gas chromatography can be used to reveal food fraud, find out where a particular batch of cocaine was produced or monitor a fermentation of cheese. "The new interpretive method of gas chromatographic analysis can make this type of analysis accessible to many more, which means that better and cheaper decisions can be made in a number of areas in society," says Professor Rasmus Bro, Department of Food Science at the University of Copenhagen (UCPH FOOD), who is one of the researchers behind the new interpretive method.


Kitchen disruption on the horizon as tech firms add AI, big data to food production

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - Looking for that perfect recipe, or a new flavor combination that delights the senses? Increasingly, players in the food industry are embracing artificial intelligence to better understand the dynamics of flavor, aroma and other factors that go into making a food product a success. Earlier this year, IBM became a surprise entrant to the food sector, announcing a partnership with seasonings maker McCormick to "explore flavor territories more quickly and efficiently using AI to learn and predict new flavor combinations" by utilizing data collected from millions of data points. The partnership highlights how technology is being used to disrupt the food industry by helping develop new products and respond to consumer preferences and offer improved nutrition and flavor. "More and more, food companies are embracing digitization and becoming data-driven," said Bernard Lahousse, co-founder of Foodpairing, a startup with offices in Belgium and New York that develops digital food "maps" and algorithms to recommend food and drink combinations.


Yara & IBM using digital to 'transform' future of farming

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Norwegian chemical company Yara International has teamed up with tech giant IBM to transform the future of farming. The two companies together endeavour to build the "world's leading" digital farming platform which, they say, will provide holistic digital services and instant agronomic advice. Yara and IBM Services will jointly innovate and commercialise digital agricultural solutions that will help increase global food production. The collaboration will draw on Yara's agronomic knowledge – backed by more than 800 agronomists and a century of experience – and IBM's digital platforms, services and expertise in AI and data analytics. "Our collaboration centres around a common goal to make a real difference in agriculture," said Terje Knutsen, EVP Sales and Marketing in Yara.


Is the grocery sector prepared for the artificial intelligence revolution?

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Sean McBride is the founder of DSM Strategic Communications. He is the former executive vice president of communications & membership services at the Grocery Manufacturers Association and former director of communications at the American Beverage Association. We are on the precipice of an artificial intelligence revolution. The signs are all around us. Autonomous vehicles traverse our roads, drones crisscross the sky and robots navigate grocery store aisles.


Robots Are Coming to Take Over Your Farms

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Advanced agriculture technology like Harvest CROO Robotics' automated strawberry harvester are poised to take on the heavy lifting for farmers. "Necessity is the mother of invention," so the saying goes. It's certainly appropriate when referring to advancements made in agriculture technology. The lack of available farm labor alone has given rise to automated smart harvesters. In a recently published article, two University of Florida researchers say robots and information technology will be the rule and no longer the exception on farms in the coming years.


Tracking Analytics with Artificial Intelligence

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Many industry giants are running out of options with increased competition. Wall Street is pressuring such companies to outpace potential disruptors or, like Ford CEO Mark Fields, get booted. Disruptors also grow -- and get huge valuations -- quickly, making buying your way to innovation less attractive. One alternative is to adopt the tools like advanced data analytics and artificial intelligence to create better efficiencies. Businesses that do so enjoy competitive advantages, significant cost savings -- and most importantly, ensure they provide their customers with the most relevant product or service.


Artificial intelligence and food – The future is now

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A new report published by the Refresh Working Group, which is funded by Google and led by the Swell Creative Group, San Francisco, aims to better understand the role artificial intelligence may play in food production, distribution, processing and consumption. Titled "Food tech: Soil to supper," the report is a first step in contextualizing how such a rapidly evolving technology may add value to the supply chain. "This report initiates a much-needed conversation about the benefits technology can bring to food production, distribution and consumption," said Ali Lange, senior public policy analyst at Google. "It is exciting to see so many every day, real-world applications of A.I. and to work together with people from across so many different sectors." The report addresses food production A.I. technologies such as autonomous tractors, drones and remote sensors that collect and analyze data in order to help farmers increase crop yields.