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AI named after V For Vendetta masks protects photos from being gathered by facial recognition apps

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Clearview AI is just one of many facial recognition firms scraping billions of online images to create a massive database for purchase – but a new program could block their efforts. Researchers designed an image clocking tool that makes subtle pixel-level changes that distort pictures enough so they cannot be used by online scrapers – and claims it is 100 percent effective. Named in honor of the'V for Vendetta' mask, Fawkes is an algorithm and software combination that'cloaks' an image to trick systems, which is like adding an invisible mask to your face. These altered pictures teach technologies a distorted version of the subject and when presented with an'uncloaked' form, the scraping app fails to recognize the individual. 'It might surprise some to learn that we started the Fawkes project a while before the New York Times article that profiled Clearview.ai in February 2020,' researchers from the SANLab at University of Chicago shared in a statement.


Intellivision video game system reboot delayed amid coronavirus pandemic, now due in April 2021

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

A delay in the arrival of the rebooted Intellivision video game console. The Intellivision Amico, the modern reboot of the iconic Intellivision video game console, which had been scheduled to hit the market Oct. 10, now is scheduled for release April 15, 2021. Because of production challenges during the pandemic, the company decided to push back the system's launch. Not to do so would have compromised quality assurance, said Intellivision Entertainment CEO Tommy Tallarico during an online event Wednesday. "Ultimately our date is going to be determined by specific quality criteria that the team has defined and not a moment before," he said.


Uncharted Waters: Maritime Blazes a Trail with AI

#artificialintelligence

Whether shipping organizations work together with huge companies such as Microsoft and Google or one of the many new maritime startups (whose numbers have recently exploded with "more than $3.3 billion …invested in digital startups in the shipping and logistics sector") it appears that shipping is not just ripe for change anymore, it's changing. If you need more convincing, a recent Inmarsat survey of 125 global ship owners found that "ship owners are far more open to deploying IoT tools for analytic, management, and operational purposes than some other industries, including mining and agriculture" and "average expenditure per business on IoT based solutions will amount to $2.5 million over the next three years" while IDC tells us that "The DX (digital transformation) programs that will receive the most funding in 2018 are digital supply chain and logistics automation ($93 billion)". An industry that has often been described as "behind the times" is now proving itself to be quite the opposite. With this in mind, I ask several experts in shipping and maritime innovation and technology, representing both large organizations and startups, to share their thoughts on how they see AI impacting the shipping industry right now.


How to Improve Computer Vision in AI Drones Using Image Annotation Services?

#artificialintelligence

The Autonomous flying drone uses the computer vision technology to hover in the air avoiding the objects to keep moving on the right path. Apart from security surveillance and Ariel view monitoring, AI drone is now used by online retail giant Amazon to deliver the products at customer's doorstep revolutionizing the transportation and delivery system by logistics and supply chain companies. Cogito and AWS SageMaker Ground Truth have partnered to accelerate your training data pipeline. We are organising a webinar to help you "Build High-Quality Training Data for Computer Vision and NLP Applications". After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


Planning law overhaul for England takes next step

BBC News

Sweeping changes to England's planning system will "cut red tape, but not standards," Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick has said. Under draft new laws, first revealed on Sunday, developers will be granted "automatic" permission to build homes and schools on sites for "growth". It follows Boris Johnson's pledge to "build back better" after coronavirus. But critics warn it could lead to "bad-quality housing" and loss of local control over development. Mr Johnson promised to speed up investment into homes and infrastructure in June to help the UK recover from the economic impact of coronavirus.


How physically taxing jobs can affect the brain

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Physically taxing jobs can hinder one's cognitive health, potentially causing a person's brain to age faster and leave them with a poorer memory as they grow older, a new study suggests. In a study published in the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience in July, researchers surveyed nearly 100 cognitively healthy older adults between ages 60 and 80 years old in order to better understand how stress plays a role in how the human brain ages. Their analysis indicated that adults who reported having higher levels of physical stress in their most recent job were also people who had a smaller hippocampal volume and poorer memory performance. The hippocampus is commonly associated with memory.


Machine learning methods provide new insights into organic-inorganic interfaces

#artificialintelligence

Oliver Hofmann and his research group at the Institute of Solid State Physics at TU Graz are working on the optimization of modern electronics. A key role in their research is played by interface properties of hybrid materials consisting of organic and inorganic components, which are used, for example, in OLED displays or organic solar cells. The team simulates these interface properties with machine-learning-based methods. The results are used in the development of new materials to improve the efficiency of electronic components. The researchers have now taken up the phenomenon of long-range charge transfer.


Artificial Intelligence in Business: The New Normal in Testing Times

#artificialintelligence

The COVID 19 situation, has rendered the industry into an unprecedented situation. Businesses across the globe are now resorting to plan out new strategies to keep the operations going, to meet clients' demands. Work-from-Home is the new normal for both the employees and the employers to function in a mitigated manner. Twitter on their tweet had suggested their employees, to function through "Work-from-Home", forever, if they want to. This new trend can be easily surmised as being effective for a while to manage operations, but cannot be ruled out as the necessary solution, for satisfying the customers and clients in the long run.


Automated Quantification of CT Patterns Associated with COVID-19 from Chest CT

#artificialintelligence

To present a method that automatically segments and quantifies abnormal CT patterns commonly present in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), namely ground glass opacities and consolidations. In this retrospective study, the proposed method takes as input a non-contrasted chest CT and segments the lesions, lungs, and lobes in three dimensions, based on a dataset of 9749 chest CT volumes. The method outputs two combined measures of the severity of lung and lobe involvement, quantifying both the extent of COVID-19 abnormalities and presence of high opacities, based on deep learning and deep reinforcement learning. The first measure of (PO, PHO) is global, while the second of (LSS, LHOS) is lobe-wise. Evaluation of the algorithm is reported on CTs of 200 participants (100 COVID-19 confirmed patients and 100 healthy controls) from institutions from Canada, Europe and the United States collected between 2002-Present (April 2020).


AI Chip Startup Syntiant Scales Production

#artificialintelligence

Syntiant Corp., the "neural decision processor" startup, announced completion of another funding round this week along with the shipment of more than 1 million low-power edge AI chips. The three-year-old startup based in Irvine, Calif., said Tuesday (Aug. The round was led by Microsoft's (NASDAQ: MSFT) venture arm M12 and Applied Ventures, the investment fund of Applied Materials (NASDAQ: AMAT). New investors included Atlantic Bridge Capital, Alpha Edison and Miramar Digital Ventures. Intel Capital was an early backer of Syntiant, part of a package of investments the chip maker announced in 2018 targeting AI processors that promise to accelerate the transition of machine learning from the cloud to edge devices.