STEM


Lab - ReadyAI

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ReadyAI Lab believes that all students should have access to artificial intelligence, not only students with computer science backgrounds or those who attend schools with highly developed technology programs. At ReadyAI Lab, we want to make AI learning a reality and help students to be empowered to use AI to change the world. ReadyAI's curriculum sparks curiosity, builds confidence, and fosters teamwork. We emphasize both STEM education and the non-technical components of learning such as collaboration, teamwork, problem-solving, performing arts, and multimedia presentations. Create projects that use AI to help address society's greatest needs in healthcare, transportation, public safety, and many more areas.


Artificial Intelligence is creating jobs in India, not just stealing them

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Five years ago, Hyderabad resident Tulasi Mathi was forced to quit her job as a maths teacher due to health issues and the birth of her two children. But today, the 29-year-old does data labelling and makes up to Rs 15,000 a month. The money isn't much but it's more than she made as a teacher, and enough to pay her kids' school fees and her own expenses. Today, she scans videos and marks and labels objects encountered by self-driving cars. Her output is used to train artificial intelligence algorithms powering such cars.


Machine learning in agriculture: Scientists are teaching computers to diagnose soybean stress

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Iowa State University scientists are working toward a future in which farmers can use unmanned aircraft to spot, and even predict, disease and stress in their crops. Their vision relies on machine learning, an automated process in which technology can help farmers respond to plant stress more efficiently. Arti Singh, an adjunct assistant professor of agronomy, is leading a multi-disciplinary research team that recently received a three-year, $499,845 grant from the U.S Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop machine learning technology that could automate the ability of farmers to diagnose a range of major stresses in soybeans. The technology under development would make use of cameras attached to unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, to gather birds-eye images of soybean fields. A computer application would automatically analyze the images and alert the farmer of trouble spots.


Machine learning in agriculture: scientists are teaching computers to diagnose soybean stress

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AMES, Iowa - Iowa State University scientists are working toward a future in which farmers can use unmanned aircraft to spot, and even predict, disease and stress in their crops. Their vision relies on machine learning, an automated process in which technology can help farmers respond to plant stress more efficiently. Arti Singh, an adjunct assistant professor of agronomy, is leading a multi-disciplinary research team that recently received a three-year, $499,845 grant from the U.S Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop machine learning technology that could automate the ability of farmers to diagnose a range of major stresses in soybeans. The technology under development would make use of cameras attached to unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, to gather birds-eye images of soybean fields. A computer application would automatically analyze the images and alert the farmer of trouble spots.


Top August Stories: How to Become More Marketable as a Data Scientist

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Here are the most popular posts in KDnuggets in August, based on the number of unique page views (UPV), and social share counts from Facebook, Twitter, and Addthis. Most Shareable (Viral) Blogs Among the top blogs, here are the blogs with the highest ratio of shares/unique views, which suggests that people who read it really liked it.


Managing the autonomous evolution - Businessday NG

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Humans are now generating an estimated 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every single day, with more data being created in the past two years than in all of human history. Managing this growing flood is complex and the task comes with a high level of responsibility. The 24/7 requirements on business and huge security challenges mean that'manual" management is no longer an option. Particularly when combined together they will let businesses manage and get value from their information more easily, effectively, and with less effort. One technology in particular that is unlocking new levels of value is the autonomous database.


An AI algorithm passed a science test. Here's what you should know.

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This article is part of Demystifying AI, a series of posts that (try to) disambiguate the jargon and myths surrounding AI. Last week, the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) introduced Aristo, an artificial intelligence model that scored above 90 percent on an 8th grade science test and 80 percent on a 12th-grade exam. Passing a science test might sound mundane, if you're not familiar with how deep learning algorithms, the current bleeding edge of AI, work. After all, AI is already performing tasks such as diagnosing cancer, detecting fraud and playing complicated games, which are much more complicated than answering simple science questions about the moon and squirrel populations. But despite its fascinating achievements, deep learning struggles when it comes to tackling problems that require reasoning and commonsense.


Peter Jansen

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I am a broadly interdisciplinary artificial intelligence researcher specializing in natural language processing and methods inspired by cognition and the brain. I apply these to application areas in science and health care. A central focus of my science research is on how we can teach computers question answering in the form of passing standardized science exams, as written. In particular, I focus on methods of automated inference that generate explanations for why the answer is correct, largely using graph-based methods. In terms of health care, I study how we can use natural language processing and inference to improve electronic health records and improve nurse communication, as well as detect potentially dangerous clinical events before they happen.


Artificial Intelligence is creating jobs in India, not just stealing them - ETtech

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Five years ago, Hyderabad resident Tulasi Mathi was forced to quit her job as a maths teacher due to health issues and the birth of her two children. But today, the 29-year-old does data labelling and makes up to Rs 15,000 a month. The money isn't much but it's more than she made as a teacher, and enough to pay her kids' school fees and her own expenses.She chanced on data labelling work through a YouTube video in 2017. Today, she scans videos and marks and labels objects encountered by self-driving cars. Her output is used to train artificial intelligence algorithms powering such cars.


Crime prevention through crime prediction

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What if the solution to solving crime, lowering murder rates and fighting the opioid crisis could be found through a marriage of computer science and entrepreneurship? That's exactly the goal of Crimer, a crime-prediction software that began as a project last year in an LSU Computer Science class. The students who created the software also created a company, named Crimer as well, made up of 12 employees--11 of whom are current or former LSU computer science students. "We collect crime data from the Internet and use it to build a national crime prediction map over the United States," said Alexander "Lex" Adams, a May 2019 LSU Computer Science graduate and founder and chief executive officer of Crimer. "A variety of machine-learning algorithms are responsible for the extraction, transformation, loading and predicting of crime reports. We complement our crime data with a variety of auxiliary data--weather, terrain, population and more."