California


Pactum Launches Artificial Intelligence Tool for Commercial Negotiations

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MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. and TALLINN, Estonia, September 16, 2019 -- Launching today, Pactum is an AI-based system that helps global companies to autonomously offer personalized, commercial negotiations on a massive scale. The Mountain View, California company, with engineering and operations in Estonia, has raised an initial $1.15 Million in pre-seed funding to augment negotiation and AI capabilities as well as scale operations. Pactum has also filed the patent this week related to its technology IP. Inefficient contracting has been estimated to cause firms to lose between 17% to 40% of the value on a given deal, depending on circumstances, according to research by KPMG. Pactum's AI helps companies improve their bottom line by implementing bespoke negotiation services for large volumes of incremental partners in every market, that might have previously been unmanaged.


Meet Five Synthetic Biology Companies Using AI To Engineer Biology

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AI is changing the field of synthetic biology and how we engineer biology. It's helping engineers design new ways to design genetic circuits -- and it could leave a remarkable impact on the future of humanity TVs and radios blare that "artificial intelligence is coming," and it will take your job and beat you at chess. But AI is already here, and it can beat you -- and the world's best -- at chess. In 2012, it was also used by Google to identify cats in YouTube videos. Today, it's the reason Teslas have Autopilot and Netflix and Spotify seem to "read your mind."


The creeping threat of facial recognition

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"[T]here's a fundamental flaw in our justification for these technologies," Accenture's Responsible AI Lead Rumman Chowdhury wrote on Twitter last month, referring to the San Francisco proposal. "Do we live in a sufficiently dangerous state that we need this? Is punitive surveillance how we achieve a healthy and secure society (it is not)?" My question about any new technology that is being rapidly adopted--AR, VR, big data, machine learning, whatever--is always "why?" Why do businesses or governments want face recognition? "'We' aren't justifying these technologies," I replied.


Trifo Adds a Little Brother, Max, to Its A.I.-Powered Line of Robot Vacuums Digital Trends

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One of Silicon Valley's million robot companies brought another cool toy to the IFA conference in Berlin this month, and it sees, hears, and speaks as it cleans. The company is Trifo: They've been around for a few years, and they're tapping into a seriously lucrative market. According to the company, Statista estimates that shipments of home robots will grow to nearly 30 billion units by 2025 and The International Federation of Robotics says the personal household service robots market will reach over $10 billion by 2020. The new gizmo, announced at the IFA event in Berlin last week, is Max, a delightfully simple brand for a pretty curious, aware, and able robot. Trifo also launched Ironpie at CES in Las Vegas early this year, a smart robot vacuum that reportedly "cleans faster, protects furniture better, is controllable from anywhere, and with a host of features that improve on the original home vacuum concept."


PRESS RELEASE, September 16, 2019 - Auransa

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PALO ALTO, CA – September 16, 2019 – Auransa Inc., an artificial intelligence (AI)-driven biotechnology company developing precision medicines in areas of significant unmet medical need, today announced that data on AU-409, the company's lead drug candidate being developed for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), will be presented at the 13th Annual Conference of the International Liver Cancer Association (ILCA). The study results will be featured in an oral presentation at the conference, which is being held September 20-22, 2019, in Chicago, IL. AU-409 is Auransa's lead drug candidate and was generated leveraging the company's proprietary AI-driven SMarTR Engine. The SMarTR Engine tackles disease heterogeneity and leverages gene expression profiles to predict responder patient populations, as well as compounds that might be effective against those patient populations. Auransa designed AU-409 to combine three essential features: DNA binding activity, antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo, and good oral bioavailability.


Meet Five Synthetic Biology Companies Using AI To Engineer Biology

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AI is changing the field of synthetic biology and how we engineer biology. It's helping engineers design new ways to design genetic circuits -- and it could leave a remarkable impact on the future of humanity TVs and radios blare that "artificial intelligence is coming", and it will take your job and beat you at chess. But AI is already here, and it can beat you -- and the world's best -- at chess. In 2012, it was also used by Google to identify cats in YouTube videos. Today, it's the reason Teslas have Autopilot and Netflix and Spotify seem to "read your mind."


The Amazing Ways That L'Oréal Uses Artificial Intelligence To Drive Business Performance

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You likely know Paris-based L'Oréal as a global cosmetics and beauty care company (the largest in the world), but you might not be aware of the company's commitment to research, innovation, and technology. In fact, since 2012, L'Oréal operates its own technology incubator, a group that operates like a start-up but focused on where beauty and technology meet. Here's an overview of the company's incubator and some other ways they are using artificial intelligence such as with its AI-powered digital skin diagnostic. L'Oréal's first incubator lab was located in New Jersey, but it now also operates additional labs in San Francisco, Paris, and Tokyo that are focused on a small number of products--a mix of apps and wearables and objects to help cosmetics be connected and customized to meet the specific needs of each customer. The incubator partners with entrepreneurs and academia to develop the latest and greatest products by using technology.


California Bans Facial Recognition From Police Body Cams Silicon UK Tech News

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Concern at the use of facial recognition technology continues as California lawmakers ban its use for the body cameras used by state and local law enforcement officers. It comes after civil rights campaign group in the US called ACLU ran a picture of every California state legislator through a facial-recognition program that matches facial pictures to a database of 25,000 criminal mugshots. The test saw the facial recognition program falsely flag 26 legislators as criminals. And to make matters worse, more than half of the falsely matched lawmakers were people of colour, according to the ACLU. Officials in San Francisco have already banned the use of facial recognition technology, meaning that local agencies, such as the local police force and other city agencies such as transportation would not be able to utilise the technology in any of their systems.


Will AI Be Fashion Forward--or a Fashion Flop?

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The narrative that often accompanies most stories about artificial intelligence these days is how machines will disrupt any number of industries, from healthcare to transportation. After all, technology already drives many of the innovations in these sectors of the economy. The definitively low-tech fashion industry would seem to be one of the last to turn over its creative direction to data scientists and machine learning algorithms. However, big brands, e-commerce giants, and numerous startups are betting that AI can ingest data and spit out Chanel. Maybe it's not surprising, given that fashion is partly about buzz and trends--and there's nothing more buzzy and trendy in the world of tech today than AI.


GE Healthcare Receives FDA Clearance of First Artificial Intelligence Algorithms Embedded On-Device to Prioritize Critical Chest X-ray Review

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WAUKESHA, Wis.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--GE Healthcare today announced the Food and Drug Administration's 510(k) clearance of Critical Care Suite, an industry-first collection of artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms embedded on a mobile X-ray device. Built in collaboration with UC San Francisco (UCSF), using GE Healthcare's Edison platform, the AI algorithms help to reduce the turn-around time it can take for radiologists to review a suspected pneumothorax, a type of collapsed lung. "X-ray – the world's oldest form of medical imaging – just got a whole lot smarter, and soon, the rest of our offerings will too," says Kieran Murphy, President & CEO, GE Healthcare. "GE Healthcare is leading the way in the creation of AI applications for diagnostic imaging and taking what was once a promise and turning it into a reality. By integrating AI into every aspect of care, we will ultimately improve patient outcomes, reduce waste and inefficiencies, and eliminate costly errors. Critical Care Suite is just the beginning."