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Sony to unveil PlayStation 5 launch video game titles, first look at games at June 4 event

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Video game devotees eager for more information on the upcoming PlayStation 5 – and the games coming for the next generation console – will soon have more details. Sony, which has said the PS5 will hit the market this holiday season, is planning a presentation for Thursday, June 4 at 4 p.m. ET/1 p.m. PT on the PlayStation YouTube and Twitch channels, according to Jim Ryan, President & CEO of Sony Interactive Entertainment. "I'm excited to share that we will soon give you a first look at the games you'll be playing after PlayStation 5 launches this holiday," he said in a blog post Friday. "The games coming to PS5 represent the best in the industry from innovative studios that span the globe. Studios, both larger and smaller, those newer and those more established, all have been hard at work developing games that will showcase the potential of the hardware."


Want to blur a face in your video? These video and photo editing tools can help

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

To step onto city streets means taking your chances with cameras recording your every move. Over the years, surveillance tools such as face recognition and artificial intelligence have made it easier for states to capture and identify a person in schools, banks, stores or busy intersections. In some cases, our own phones serve as surveillance tools, with social media helping users spread their recordings. Most recently, a video taken by a bystander shows the death of 46-year-old George Floyd after a white police officer kneeled on the Floyd's neck, causing outrage and protests across the nation. Body-worn cameras are also used by police officers, making it a surveillance tool for both the law enforcement and members of the community.


Announcing the winners of the Towards On-Device AI research awards - Facebook Research

CMU School of Computer Science

In December 2019, Facebook launched the Towards On-Device AI request for proposals (RFP). The purpose of this RFP was to support the academic community in addressing fundamental challenges in this research area, to accelerate the transition toward a truly "smart" world where AI capabilities permeate all devices and sensors. "We've seen strong progress in moving AI workloads from the cloud to on-device. Running models locally has already helped drive new capabilities like speech assistants, night modes on cameras, and an entirely new class of intelligent devices like smartwatches and smart thermostats," says Vikas Chandra, Director of AI Research. "This is important to push further to preserve privacy, latency, and compute power, and to help create even more experiences that can be useful to us in everyday life."


Facebook knew its algorithm made people turn against each other but stopped research

The Independent - Tech

Facebook executives took the decision to end research that would make the social media site less polarising for fears that it would unfairly target right-wing users, according to new reports. The company also knew that its recommendation algorithm exacerbated divisiveness, leaked internal research from 2016 appears to indicate. Building features to combat that would require the company to sacrifice engagement – and by extension, profit – according to a later document from 2018 which described the proposals as "antigrowth" and requiring "a moral stance." "Our algorithms exploit the human brain's attraction to divisiveness," a 2018 presentation warned, warning that if action was not taken Facebook would provide users "more and more divisive content in an effort to gain user attention & increase time on the platform." According to a report from the Wall Street Journal, in 2017 and 2018 Facebook conducted research through newly created "Integrity Teams" to tackle extremist content and a cross-jurisdictional task force dubbed "Common Ground."


Author rich content in QnA Maker knowledge base and enable role based sharing

#artificialintelligence

Managing rich content in a QnA Maker chatbot has always been a challenge, since the users had to edit raw markdown. Now QnA Maker enables your to add and edit rich content right in the portal, so what you see in the edit experience is what you see in the Bot response. Also introducing new access roles (Editor and Reader) which can be assigned to a QnA Maker service, to restrict allowed operations. The AI Show's Favorite links: Don't miss new episodes, subscribe to the AI Show https://aka.ms/aishowsubscribe


Between hope and hype

#artificialintelligence

But also: 'AI will deepen my research and bring it a step further than it is now.' There is a wide range of opinions. Nevertheless, four out of five Dutch scientists foresee that AI will have a considerable impact on society. Two thirds also believe that AI will have a radical impact on science. The figures come from a survey that the editorial board of Research commissioned among researchers in various disciplines at Dutch knowledge institutions.


Bluecore raises $50M for its first-party, AI-based marketing automation tools – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

As more online brands look for ways to move beyond third-party cookies as a way of gaining more direct insights about their users and customers, a startup that has developed a platform to help them has raised a big round of funding. Bluecore, a marketing technology firm that uses data gained from direct marketing like email, social media, site activity and combines that with machine learning to make better predictions about who might want to buy what among its customers, is today announcing that it has raised $50 million. The funding will be used to build the next generation of the Bluecore platform, expected later this year, which will tap into aggregated engagement data (but not actual browsing individuals) from "hundreds" of brands, which customers can combine with their own first-party data -- based on consent-based, first-party customer IDs -- to develop better targeting insights. "There are a lot of systems that focus on customer data and transactional data but no system that focuses on the product and product catalogue, which we think is the key asset," said Fayez Mohamood, the co-founder and CEO, in an interview. He says that the company manages over 200 million products and SKUs, second only to Amazon's and bigger than Walmart's, that companies can matches with consumer identities (from email and other direct channels).


Disney , Hulu, Prime Video on Echo and Google displays

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Upgrading from a smart speaker (like the Echo Dot) to a smart display (like the Echo Show) can be a game-changer. With a display, you can have recipes at your fingertips in the kitchen, a multi-functional digital photo frame in your living room, and easily enjoy a hands-free video chat from anywhere in the house. You can also quickly see information like the outside temperature and control your smart light switches and door locks from the touch screen. But smart displays are also great for watching your favorite shows while you work, whether you're cooking in the kitchen or putting away laundry in the bedroom. There's just one caveat: Different devices support different streaming platforms.


The Morning After: Swiss contact tracing app uses Google & Apple tech

Engadget

Another day, another canceled event. This time it's BlizzCon -- although we do have a likely online-only event to look forward to next year. Still, after last night's HBO Max debut, the big highlight on today's schedule is the planned SpaceX Crew Dragon launch. Set to go off at 4:33 PM ET -- if the weather holds up, at last check, there was a 60 percent chance of favorable conditions -- it will be a major step forward for the long-delayed Commercial Crew Program. According to the Swiss university EPFL, the country's tracing app, SwissCovid, is the first in the world to put the Apple–Google model to use.


France's New Online Hate Speech Law Is Fundamentally Flawed

Slate

The solution to online hate speech seems so simple: Delete harmful content, rinse, repeat. But David Kaye, a law professor at the University of California, Irvine, and the U.N. special rapporteur on freedom of expression, says that while laws to regulate hate speech might seem promising, they often aren't that effective--and, perhaps worse, they can set dangerous precedents. This is why France's new social media law, which follows in Germany's footsteps, is controversial across the political spectrum there and abroad. On May 13, France passed "Lutte contre la haine sur internet" ("Fighting hate on the internet"), a law that requires social media platforms to rapidly take down hateful content. Comments that are discriminatory--based on race, gender, disability, sexual orientation, and religion--or sexually abusive have to be removed within 24 hours of being flagged by users.