Law


Flynn Coleman with Joseph M. Azam - A Human Algorithm (San Francisco Ferry Building Store)

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The Age of Intelligent Machines is upon us, and we are at a reflection point. The proliferation of fast-moving technologies, including forms of artificial intelligence, will cause us to confront profound questions about ourselves. The era of human intellectual superiority is ending, and, as a species, we need to plan for this monumental shift. A Human Algorithm: How Artificial Intelligence Is Redefining Who We Are examines the immense impact intelligent technology will have on humanity. These machines, while challenging our personal beliefs and our socio-economic world order, also have the potential to transform our health and well-being, alleviate poverty and suffering, and reveal the mysteries of intelligence and consciousness.


"Please, explain." Interpretability of black-box machine learning models

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In February 2019 Polish government added an amendment to a banking law that gives a customer a right to receive an explanation in case of a negative credit decision. This means that a bank needs to be able to explain why the loan wasn't granted if the decision process was automatic.


Video reveals how patent-pending stealth material can hide objects by bending light

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Invisibility cloak technology has been developed that bends light in order to make objects disappear. The material, which was created by Canada-based camouflage company Hyperstealth, could be used to hide large items such as army tanks or even to shield troops on the ground from enemies. Amazing video footage shows the screen in all its glory – in one clip a white sheet on the screen is visible, before a small miniature tank is revealed behind the screen. This is while another clip shows the screen in front of what looks like a tree, but it comes down, revealing a large housing complex. The company has been developing the technology for a number of years but has now applied for patents to begin the process of manufacturing it.


Huawei surveillance: Chinese snooping tech seen spreading to nations vulnerable to abuse, keeping tabs on trouble-makers

The Japan Times

BELGRADE – When hundreds of video cameras with the power to identify and track individuals started appearing in the streets of Belgrade as part of a major surveillance project, some protesters began having second thoughts about joining anti-government demonstrations in the Serbian capital. Local authorities assert the system, created by Chinese telecommunications company Huawei, helps reduce crime in the city of 2 million. Critics contend it erodes personal freedoms, makes political opponents vulnerable to retribution and even exposes the country's citizens to snooping by the Chinese government. The cameras, equipped with facial recognition technology, are being rolled out across hundreds of cities around the world, particularly in poorer countries with weak track records on human rights where Beijing has increased its influence through big business deals. With the United States claiming that Chinese state authorities can get backdoor access to Huawei data, the aggressive rollout is raising concerns about the privacy of millions of people in countries with little power to stand up to China.


Artificial Intelligence Is on the Case in the Legal Profession

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AI robot lawyers are here--and they aren't going away. When you hear the phrase "robot lawyer," what comes to mind? My brain conjures up an image of C-3PO in a three-piece suit, shuffling around a courtroom, while throwing out cross-examination quips such as: "Don't call me a mindless philosopher, you overweight glob of prosecuting witness grease!" Artificial intelligence (AI) is, in fact, becoming a mainstay component of the legal profession. In some circumstances, this analytics-crunching technology is using algorithms and machine learning to do work that was previously done by entry-level lawyers.


Young climate activists, artificial intelligence experts and 25 reasons for hope - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

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While many news stories focus on the pitfalls of technology, Wired did something a little different and put together a cover story of 25 people and groups who the magazine says are "racing to save us." From climate change to the growing power of big tech behemoths, the world is facing any number of challenges, in some cases existential ones. The innovations that facilitate our lives are frequently double edged swords. The power plants that quench our thirst for electricity are spewing planet warming emissions into the atmosphere. The facial recognition algorithms that can help organize smartphone photo collections also have inherent biases against women and minorities.


The March of Artificial Intelligence to Address Climate Change and Ultimately Help Save the Planet

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People around the world marched for climate change on September 20, 2019, with protests taking place across 4,500 locations in 150 countries, all inspired by Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg. It is obvious the call for a healthier planet is being demanded by more and more people internationally. But what is the answer? Millions of people across the globe marched on September 20, 2019 to demand urgent action on climate change. One of the questions being posed: Can Artificial Intelligence (AI) and tech companies help address climate change and save the planet?


Artificial Intelligence Is on the Case in the Legal Profession

#artificialintelligence

AI robot lawyers are here--and they aren't going away. When you hear the phrase "robot lawyer," what comes to mind? My brain conjures up an image of C-3PO in a three-piece suit, shuffling around a courtroom, while throwing out cross-examination quips such as: "Don't call me a mindless philosopher, you overweight glob of prosecuting witness grease!" Artificial intelligence (AI) is, in fact, becoming a mainstay component of the legal profession. In some circumstances, this analytics-crunching technology is using algorithms and machine learning to do work that was previously done by entry-level lawyers.


The Patent Office Is Hunting for an Artificial Intelligence Expert

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The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office recently launched a recruitment effort to hire its first-ever senior-level artificial intelligence expert to advance the agency's applications of the emerging technology and provide technical expertise to keep employees on the leading edge. In a conversation with Nextgov, USPTO's chief information officer provided a look inside the search to fill the new role and explained how it all fits into the agency's broader vision around modernization. "We need to figure out how we can use those algorithms to the best of our abilities," CIO Henry "Jamie" Holcombe said Friday. "We've seen an explosion in AI submissions and so AI is now maturing to a point to where it actually can be used--we don't want it to be a buzzword." USPTO's mission is to award patents to inventors and businesses and register trademarks for products and intellectual property. When Holcombe took on the agency's top information technology management role earlier this year, the office already had many AI-related efforts underway.


Diveplane Unveils GEMINAI, The Industry's First Verifiable Synthetic 'Twin' Dataset

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Diveplane, the company keeping the humanity in artificial intelligence (AI), today announced the availability of GEMINAI, the industry's first verifiable synthetic'twin' dataset. GEMINAI empowers businesses and government organizations to easily and safely sell, share and analyze sensitive datasets without the fear of mishandling, loss or theft. The'twin' dataset looks, acts, and feels realistic for the purposes of data modeling and analysis, but does not contain any personally identifiable information, which is critical for businesses that need to adhere to national and international privacy laws and compliance requirements, like GDPR, PHI and HIPAA. "We love seeing AI increasingly adopted by many industries, but we're finding that not all AI is created and trained equally," said Dr. Michael Capps, CEO of Diveplane. "Many businesses are forced to use inaccurate or incomplete data to train their AI due to privacy requirements, which can lead to the AI making poor or misleading decisions. With GEMINAI, we're eliminating that risk by creating a verifiable synthetic'twin' of the dataset, so that businesses don't need to sacrifice the quality of their AI for the sake of privacy. GEMINAI offers the best of both worlds and we're excited to introduce this first-of-its-kind technology to the market."