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Street Lamps as a Platform

Communications of the ACM

Street lamps constitute the densest electrically operated public infrastructure in urban areas. Their changeover to energy-friendly LED light quickly amortizes and is increasingly leveraged for smart city projects, where LED street lamps double, for example, as wireless networking or sensor infrastructure. We make the case for a new paradigm called SLaaP--street lamps as a platform. SLaaP is proposed as an open, enabling platform, fostering innovative citywide services for the full range of stakeholders and end users--seamlessly extending from everyday use to emergency response. In this article, we first describe the role and potential of street lamps and introduce one novel base service as a running example. We then discuss citywide infrastructure design and operation, followed by addressing the major layers of a SLaaP infrastructure: hardware, distributed software platform, base services, value-added services and applications for users and'things.' Finally, we discuss the crucial roles and participation of major stakeholders: citizens, city, government, and economy. Recent years have seen the emergence of smart street lamps, with very different meanings of'smart'--sometimes related to the original purpose as with usage-dependent lighting, but mostly as add-on capabilities like urban sensing, monitoring, digital signage, WiFi access, or e-vehicle charging.a The future holds even more use cases: for example, after a first wave of 5G mobile network rollouts from 2020 onward, a second wave shall apply mm-wave frequencies for which densely deployed light poles can be appropriate'cell towers.'


California Activists Ramp Up Fight Against Facial-Recognition Technology

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

"This is a bill being sold as a privacy bill, but it's a wolf in sheep's clothing," Matt Cagle, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, said in an interview. The ACLU, Electronic Frontier Foundation and other civil liberties groups held a virtual rally Thursday night to rail against the bill, calling it vaguely worded and potentially dangerous for low-income communities hit hard by the coronavirus. Their remarks were the latest shots fired from a campaign to halt the legislation. The bill's fate in California--which has pushed for more aggressive privacy protections in recent years--could foreshadow how a potentially huge market for facial recognition technology is regulated by other states. The bill calls for companies and agencies that use facial recognition tools in areas accessible to the public to "provide a conspicuous and contextually appropriate notice" that faces may get scanned.


How to reverse-engineer a rainforest

Engadget

But 2019 was the year the earth burned. In Australia, the world watched in horror as bushfires destroyed 10.3 million hectares, marking the continent's most intense and destructive fire season in over 40 years. Earlier that fall, California saw more than 101,000 hectares destroyed, with damages upward of $80 billion. Alaska saw nearly a million. Record-breaking fires also hit Indonesia, Russia, Lebanon -- but nowhere saw the sheer mass of media coverage as the fires that tore through the Amazon nearly all last summer. By year's end, thousands of global media outlets had reported that Brazil's largest rainforest played host to more than 80,000 individual forest fires in 2019, resulting in an estimated 906,000 square hectares of environmental destruction. At the time, Brazil's National Institute for Space Research reported it was the fastest rate of burning since record keeping began in 2013. But amid the charred ruins of one of the largest oxygen-producing environments on the planet, a secret lies buried beneath the soil.


Meet 'Tala' the articial intelligence agent that speaks Samoan

#artificialintelligence

An artificial intelligence agent named Tala may open the door on a new way of gathering feedback from New Zealand's Samoan community. The Talanoa Project is a pilot project that uses IBM's artificial intelligence virtual agent solution, Watson, to interact in real time in Samoan for public consultation and community engagement. Developed and designed by Beca, business director Matthew Ensor said it was about consulting with'the silent majority' in the public on projects and community facilities. "We don't hear so much from the people where language is a barrier, where culturally there's no tradition of responding to public consultation. "We then created a conversational agent, it's like a chat-bot and what it does is it mimics the kind of conversation that you would have with a consultation expert," Mr Ensor said. "It will ask open questions about your thoughts on different things and really lets the person lead the conversation rather than a survey form where the questions are completely scripted." Steve O'Donnell from IBM New Zealand's Managing Partner for Global Business Services said this was the first time IBM Watson Assistant had been used for public consultation in New Zealand in a language other than English. "What we are seeing now is AI being able to scale down, and drive value in many industries," he said. "IBM Watson has already transformed the world of customer service, due largely to its ability to understand human sentiment and interact naturally with people and Tala is a promising first step towards that." The Talanoa Project, part funded by Callaghan Innovation, tested Tala among a few dozen Samoan speakers, asking them for their thoughts on their local community facilities. The focus group of Samoans ranged from 19-years of age to 77 being the oldest and included Samoan elders, law students, psychologists and sociologists. "It was overwhelmingly positive the response we got back from the Samoan community," Mr Ensor said. "We had a few people share that it was great to hear technology using their native language.


Alexander Jung

#artificialintelligence

This lecture discusses how decision trees can be used to represent predictor functions. Variations of the basic decision tree model provide some of the most powerful machine learning methods curren... Alexander Jung uploaded a video 1 week ago Classification Methods - Duration: 46 minutes. Our focus is on linear regression methods which can be expanded by feature constructions. Guest lecture of Prof. Minna Huotilainen on learning processes in human brains. Alexander Jung subscribed to a channel 3 weeks ago Playing For Change - Channel PFC is a movement created to inspire and connect the world through music. The idea for this project came from a common belief that music has the power to break down boundaries and overcome distances SubscribeSubscribedUnsubscribe1.9M This video explains how network Lasso can be used to learn localized linear models that allow "personalized" predictions for individual data points within a network.


The 'Invisible' Materiality of Information Technology

Communications of the ACM

Such a disappearance is a fundamental consequence not of technology but of human psychology. Whenever people learn something sufficiently well, they cease to be aware of it. Thus, Weiser's vision is even broader: as this technology becomes truly embedded in human activity we won't be aware of it at all. As the field of ubiquitous computing has evolved, with computation embedded in walls, clothes, and so forth, the materiality to support it is often physically and intentionally hidden from the user. Indeed, this material disappearance is often considered evidence of good design. The "agent" metaphor, in particular in its early presentations such as the Knowledge Navigator and Starfire, is also another utopian vision. These virtual agents are typically accessible via peripherals such as screens or phones, doing the bidding of those they serve.


One Man Cannot Summon The Future…

#artificialintelligence

JA: In terms of the VMS market itself – it seems the leading players are more clearly defined, and some players are fading away. Would you agree with that? PR: Up to a certain point the basic video recording functionality is commoditised, what's not commoditised is the reliability with which that functionality can be carried out. Regardless, there will always be at least 3 competitors in any market. So, yes, the market is fragmented but is becoming less fragmented. JA: What in your opinion are the major VMS trends of the moment?


Utah man stabbed Tinder date to death hours after meeting her, police say

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A Utah man was arrested on Sunday after he called police claiming he had killed a woman he met on Tinder. Ethan Hunsaker, 24, surrendered to officers from the Layton Police Department and was charged with first-degree murder. He told police he had met the 25-year-old victim late Saturday night after connecting on the dating app.


Police Arrest Utah Man Suspected of Killing His Tinder Date

U.S. News

Ethan Hunsaker, 24, called 911 early Sunday to report he'd killed someone inside a home in Layton, the Layton Police Department said in a prepared statement. When officers responded to the home, they found a woman lying on the floor with multiple stab wounds to her torso. Emergency workers tried to resuscitate her, but she died of her injuries at the scene. The woman's name was not immediately released.


Deforest Launches Technology Practice - Leaders League

#artificialintelligence

The technology practice will be headed by Etienne Luquet Farías and Israel Cedillo Lazcano, specialists in the field who will offer comprehensive and strategic legal advice in all issues relating to innovation, both in the private and public sectors. They will be responsible for the design and supervision of projects relating to the development of technology-focused startups, software and hardware IP, technology transfer, privacy policies and venture capital, as well as fintech, crypto assets, artificial intelligence and machine learning. The technology practice will assist clients in the determination of possible civil or criminal liabilities arising from the creation and use of algorithms, the assignment of rights, the drafting of codes of ethics and regulation through the use of technologies, among other needs. "Technology law involves a plurality of legal norms and technical issues, making it a particularly complex cross-disciplinary practice. Through the use of new technologies, legal problems can be solved in a new way, creating new opportunities," the firm said in a statement.