Education


Common Sense AI: Making Deep Learning Technologies More Human - Appen

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AI technology has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years. So many products and services now rely on the technology to provide automation and intelligence that it is deeply and irrevocably intertwined with our everyday world. Whether through devices we use to enable convenience at home or in the way products we use all the time are manufactured, its impact is everywhere, driving innovation in just about every aspect of our lives. But there are missing pieces to this puzzle that still cause frustration for end-users and present significant challenges for researchers trying to improve how AI technology performs. A common sense approach Before his passing in 2018, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen dedicated an admirable amount of time and resources to solving an essential challenge that seems to come up again and again: The fundamental lack of common sense in AI technologies.


African scientists take on new ATLAS machine-learning challenge ATLAS Experiment at CERN

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Cirta is a new machine-learning challenge for high-energy physics on Zindi, the Africa-based data-science challenge platform. Launched this autumn at the International Conference on High Energy and Astroparticle Physics (TIC-HEAP), Constantine, Algeria, Cirta challenges participants to provide machine-learning solutions for identifying particles in LHC experiment data. Cirta* is the first particle-physics challenge to specifically target computer scientists in Africa, and puts the public TrackML challenge dataset to new use. Created by ATLAS computer scientists Sabrina Amrouche and Dalila Salamani, the Cirta challenge aims to bring new blood into the growing field of machine learning for particle physics. "Zindi has a strong community of computer scientists based on the continent, and we're looking forward to reviewing their creative solutions to the challenge," says Salamani.


Machine-learning next level: machines teaching themselves

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Can you imagine a world without the kind of voice assistant technology provided by Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, Siri on the iPhone or Cortana for Windows? Probably not, as we tend to take such technological leaps forward pretty much for granted. But behind the scenes there's a whole new world of machine-learning that drives their collective ability to seemingly answer any question put to them. It's not so much knowing the answer that's the technological miracle – because, well, the internet – but rather that these virtual assistants are able to understand the question in the first place. Machine-learning is, in the broadest possible terms, what you might expect in that computer algorithms can be trained to understand how to correctly respond to an input by way of a human telling it what that response should be.


Why traditional Agile/Devops models aren't good enough for AI production?

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The need for convergence of people, process and technology in modern business has ignited the evolution of newer engineering methodologies. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is no exception. It demands even greater interaction of human and non-human resources in the production processes. AI solutions are built on the basis of an algorithm, data and the continuous learning process. Constantly growing data has enriched the quality of the knowledge and increased computing power has extended machine learning into deep learning; together, our collective ability to quickly evolve an AI solution has improved.


Machine Learning Using Hardware and Software

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For developers, advances in hardware and software for machine learning (ML) promise to bring these sophisticated methods to Internet of Things (IoT) edge devices. As this field of research evolves, however, developers can easily find themselves immersed in the deep theory behind these techniques instead of focusing on currently available solutions to help them get an ML-based design to market. To help designers get moving more quickly, this article briefly reviews the objectives and capabilities of ML, the ML development cycle, and the architecture of a basic fully connected neural network and a convolutional neural network (CNN). It then discusses the frameworks, libraries, and drivers that are enabling mainstream ML applications. It concludes by showing how general purpose processors and FPGAs can serve as the hardware platform for implementing machine learning algorithms.


Machine Learning Market Demonstrates Solid Growth

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Machine learning technologies and techniques are giving organizations powerful new ways to utilize the vast amounts of data they're collecting. According to several reports, ML spending is increasing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of around 25%. That's benefitting vendors providing ML solutions, which appears to be mostly cloud vendors outside of the HPC segment. According to Zion Market Research's July report, the global market for ML was valued at $1.6 billion in 2017 and is expected to account for $20.8 billion in spending by 2024, which translates into a rather healthy 44% compound annual growth rate (CAGR). That was the outlier in a recent roundup of ML market reports. Market Reports World came up with a similar number in its global tally on ML spending.


How to Become a Data Scientist

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If you do know what a Data Scientist is, you are rare to find, as since even the most experienced professionals still have difficulty defining the scope of the area. One possible delimitation is that the data scientist is the person responsible for producing predictive and / or explanatory models using machine learning and statistics.


How to stop the brain drain of artificial intelligence experts out of academia (opinion) Inside Higher Ed

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Universities have long been a source of talented leaders for industry, but an accelerating exodus of professors with expertise in artificial intelligence has caused concerns. A recent Bloomberg op-ed asked, "If industry keeps hiring the cutting-edge scholars, who will train the next generation of innovators in artificial intelligence?" This article analyzes the problem and suggests solutions. The brain drain of AI experts out of academia can be explained in simple economic terms. The demand for experts has outpaced supply, leading to sharply increased prices.


Machine Learning with Python Business Applications AI Robot

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If the word'Machine Learning' baffles your mind and you want to master it, then this Machine Learning course is for you. If you want to start your career in Machine Learning and make money from it, then this Machine Learning course is for you. If you want to learn how to manipulate things by learning the Math beforehand and then write a code with python, then this Machine Learning course is for you. If you get bored of the word'this Machine Learning course is for you', then this Machine Learning course is for you. Well, machine learning is becoming a widely-used word on everybody's tongue, and this is reasonable as data is everywhere, and it needs something to get use of it and unleash its hidden secrets, and since humans' mental skills cannot withstand that amount of data, it comes the need to learn machines to do that for us.


Supply of AI workers failing to meet demand - Government News

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The government must take strategic action to ensure the nation's AI workforce will meet future demands because current supply is falling short, a new report warns. The report from CSIRO's data sciences arm Data61 focuses on how the nation can capture the full potential of artificial intelligence technology, which is already being used in a wide range of fields. The Artificial Intelligence: Solving problems, growing the economy and improving our quality of life report found that Australia currently has 6,600 AI specialist workers, which is up from 650 AI workers in 2014 and is predicted to grow. However it is well short of the up to 160,000 workers that may be required in the next ten years. "We estimate that by 2030 Australian industry will require a workforce of between 32,000 to 161,000 employees in computer vision, robotics, human language technologies, data science and other areas of AI expertise," the report says.