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The Future: Instructional Materials


Here's a free AI class that'll prepare you for the robot takeover

#artificialintelligence

The Finnish Center for Artificial Intelligence now offers a free six-part online course, The Elements of AI, available to anyone. I like free stuff: Especially when there's no catch. Sign up is quick and simple, and there's no application process. Completion of the course will earn you a LinkedIn certificate and, if you're enrolled in a Finnish university, you can get a couple credits. It's happening, Join 15k digital minds to shape what's next for your business More importantly, you'll get a free education designed to introduce students to the basic concepts surrounding artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning.


Looking to the Future of AI: A Capstone Course

#artificialintelligence

In fruition the advances in artificial intelligence have been significant in many fields (and obviously in tech) such as medicine, education, the arts etc. The potential for artificial intelligence in the future is huge and the discourse surrounding its impact on society is hotly debated by governments small and large. Where Do I Think We Are Going? The potential for the Internet of Things will probably explode in the next five years. Medicine (bio medics) has just started to tap the potential for large scale analytics/pipeline. Let the discourse continue, but I personally am excited to see what artificial intelligence brings to the world in the next ten years.


The Brain vs. Deep Learning vs. Singularity

#artificialintelligence

In this blog post I will delve into the brain and explain its basic information processing machinery and compare it to deep learning. I do this by moving step-by-step along with the brains electrochemical and biological information processing pipeline and relating it directly to the architecture of convolutional nets. Thereby we will see that a neuron and a convolutional net are very similar information processing machines. While performing this comparison, I will also discuss the computational complexity of these processes and thus derive an estimate for the brains overall computational power. I will use these estimates, along with knowledge from high performance computing, to show that it is unlikely that there will be a technological singularity in this century. This blog post is complex as it arcs over multiple topics in order to unify them into a coherent framework of thought. I have tried to make this article as readable as possible, but I might have not succeeded in all places.


IBM Made a 'Crash Course' For The White House, And It'll Teach You All The AI Basics

#artificialintelligence

Vernor Vinge once stated in his book The Singularity, "We are on the edge of change comparable to the rise of human life on Earth." As AI now undoubtedly plays a pivotal role in many industries, its risks and repercussions simply cannot be ignored; and shining a light upon these has never been more imperative. That's why, in response to the White House's Notice Of Request For Information (RFI), IBM has created what seems to be an AI 101--covering the huge field of AI and its vast potential applications. "The views of the American people, including stakeholders such as consumers, academic and industry researchers, private companies, and charitable foundations, are important to inform an understanding of current and future needs for AI in diverse fields," the RFI summary read. IBM's AI 101 consisted of a numbered list of topics in a somewhat re-ordered and slightly re-factored response to the RFI's questions.


The Brain vs. Deep Learning vs. Singularity

#artificialintelligence

In this blog post I will delve into the brain and explain its basic information processing machinery and compare it to deep learning. I do this by moving step-by-step along with the brains electrochemical and biological information processing pipeline and relating it directly to the architecture of convolutional nets. Thereby we will see that a neuron and a convolutional net are very similar information processing machines. While performing this comparison, I will also discuss the computational complexity of these processes and thus derive an estimate for the brains overall computational power. I will use these estimates, along with knowledge from high performance computing, to show that it is unlikely that there will be a technological singularity in this century. This blog post is complex as it arcs over multiple topics in order to unify them into a coherent framework of thought. I have tried to make this article as readable as possible, but I might have not succeeded in all places.


Leveraging the Singularity: Introducing AI to Liberal Arts Students

AAAI Conferences

In recent years, the notion that computers and robots will attain superhuman levels of intelligence in the next few decades, ushering in a new "posthuman" era in evolutionary history, has gained widespread attention among technology enthusiasts, thanks in part to books such as Ray Kurzweil's The Singularity Is Near. This paper describes an introductory-level AI course designed to examine this idea in an objective way by exploring the field of AI as it currently is, in addition to what it might become in the future. An important goal of the course is to place these ideas within the broader context of human and cosmic evolution. The course is aimed at undergraduate liberal arts students with no prior background in science or engineering.