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The Acclimation and Legality of Superior Machines

#artificialintelligence

We live in a world where we are constantly in contact with Artificial Intelligence, perhaps without even being aware. We live in a world where we are constantly in contact with Artificial Intelligence, perhaps without even being aware. It may not seem that way due to the stigma that Hollywood has put into our mind about what exactly Artificial Intelligence is (killer robots, omniscient software, etc.) but it's really a lot simpler than that. John McCarthy (2007) defined Artificial Intelligence as the science and engineering of making intelligent [having the computational ability to achieve goals in the world] machines. Right now, the main way in which these machines "learn" is through rote learning (trail and error) and drawing inferences. It is widely believed that "AI [artificial intelligence] will drive the human race" (Prime Minister Navendra Modi) and there is not true evidence for or against the contrary, but it is widely accepted that A.I. does and will have a extreme influence on day to day life.


Real-World Applications of Artificial Intelligence To Improve Medication Management Across the Care Continuum - Electronic Health Reporter

#artificialintelligence

Discussions about the application of artificial intelligence (AI) in healthcare often span multiple areas, most commonly about making more accurate diagnoses, identifying at-risk populations, and better understanding how individual patients will respond to medicines and treatment protocols. To date, there has been relatively little discussion about practical applications of AI to improve medication management across the care continuum, an area this article will address. What's the first thing that comes to mind when someone mentions prescription drugs in the United States? In poll after poll, the high and rising costs of medications are American voters' top healthcare-related issue. This concern is well founded.


5 reasons why Microsoft is even entertaining a Tik Tok purchase

ZDNet

Microsoft's talks to acquire Tik Tok don't make a whole lot of sense on the surface. In fact, nothing about this deal makes sense given you have a tech giant that is known for the enterprise, President Trump tweeting about Tik Tok, legislators chiming in and a 45-day deal deadline. Sure, I've read a few Wall Street analysts do some mental gymnastics to argue for the Microsoft purchase of Tik Tok. Depending on price ($10 billion too good to pass up and $50 billion crazy), Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella is going to have some explaining to do. With all that said, here is a bit of informed speculation about why this Microsoft-Tik Tok lunacy is happening. The Department of Defense's JEDI cloud contract is to be announced soon.


IMD plans to use artificial intelligence in weather forecasting

#artificialintelligence

NEW DELHI: The India Meteorological Department (IMD) is planning to use artificial intelligence in weather forecasting, especially for issuing nowcasts, which can help improve 3-6 hours prediction of extreme weather events, its Director General Mrutunjay Mohapatra said on Sunday. He said the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning is not as prevalent as it is in other fields and it is relatively new in the area of weather forecasting. The IMD has invited research groups who can study how artificial intelligence (AI) be used for improving weather forecasting and the Ministry of Earth Sciences is evaluating their proposals, Mohapatra said. He said the IMD is also planning to do collaborative studies on this with other institutions. The IMD uses different tools like radars, satellite imagery, to issue nowcasts, which gives information on extreme weather events occurring in the next 3-6 hours.


Congress and technology: Do lawmakers understand Google and Facebook enough to regulate them?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Many of us have had the feeling that technology, which continues to change at an ever-dizzying pace, may be leaving us behind. That was embodied this past week during a Congressional hearing, nominally convened to investigate antitrust concerns of four big tech titans: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. While the five-and-a-half-hour inquiry touched on a range topics from pesky spam filters and search results to how companies approached acquisitions, the House Judiciary subcommittee hearing laid one thing bare: A sizable disconnect appears to exist between the technology Americans are using and depending on in their daily lives and the knowledge base of people with the power and responsibility to decide its future and regulation. "Consumers and investors walk away feeling like a lot of these lawmakers don't really understand the business models to an extent that they could then navigate them and put laws in place that will dictate the future of where they go," said Daniel Ives, an analyst with Wedbush Securities. The antitrust subcommittee hearing had been convened to look into the tech giants' market dominance.


U.S. Representatives Release Bipartisan Plan for AI and National Security

#artificialintelligence

Bradford specializes in matters related to trade secrets and Artificial Intelligence. He is the Chair of the AI Subcommittee of the ABA. Recognized by the Daily Journal in 2019 as one of the Top 20 AI attorneys in California, Bradford has been instrumental in proposing federal AI workplace and IP legislation that in 2018 was turned into a United States House of Representatives Discussion Draft bill. He has also developed AI oversight and corporate governance best practices designed to ensure algorithmic fairness. What was it that initially ignited your interest in artificial intelligence?


IMD plans to use artificial intelligence in weather forecasting

#artificialintelligence

The IMD uses different tools like radars, satellite imagery, to issue nowcasts, which gives information on extreme weather events occurring in the next 3-6 hours. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) is planning to use artificial intelligence in weather forecasting, especially for issuing nowcasts, which can help improve 3-6 hours prediction of extreme weather events, its Director-General Mrutunjay Mohapatra said on Sunday. He said the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning is not as prevalent as it is in other fields and it is relatively new in the area of weather forecasting. The IMD has invited research groups who can study how artificial intelligence (AI) be used for improving weather forecasting and the Ministry of Earth Sciences is evaluating their proposals, Mohapatra said. He said the IMD is also planning to do collaborative studies on this with other institutions.


Life Imitates Orwell...

#artificialintelligence

And I am talking Season 3. Or Amazon's hit, The Handmaid's Tale? Do you just binge and veg out or are you like me, and see how easily we could, and are, slipping into these worlds? After watching shows like this I often find myself reflecting back on George Orwell's 1984. It proves more eerily prophetic with each passing year. This Season, I fear, the writers of Westworld are almost scripting our future lives. You may not have caught it, but it is all in there.


Face masks are breaking facial recognition algorithms, says new government study

#artificialintelligence

Face masks are one of the best defenses against the spread of COVID-19, but their growing adoption is having a second, unintended effect: breaking facial recognition algorithms. Wearing face masks that adequately cover the mouth and nose causes the error rate of some of the most widely used facial recognition algorithms to spike to between 5 percent and 50 percent, a study by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has found. Black masks were more likely to cause errors than blue masks, and the more of the nose covered by the mask, the harder the algorithms found it to identify the face. "With the arrival of the pandemic, we need to understand how face recognition technology deals with masked faces," said Mei Ngan, an author of the report and NIST computer scientist. "We have begun by focusing on how an algorithm developed before the pandemic might be affected by subjects wearing face masks. Later this summer, we plan to test the accuracy of algorithms that were intentionally developed with masked faces in mind."


Iran Says It Detained Leader of California-Based Exile Group

NYT > Middle East

Iran on Saturday said it had detained an Iranian-American leader of a little-known, California-based opposition group for allegedly planning a 2008 attack on a mosque that killed 14 people and wounded over 200 others. Iran's Intelligence Ministry also asserted that the detained man, Jamshid Sharmahd of the Kingdom Assembly of Iran, planned more attacks around the Islamic Republic amid heightened tensions between Tehran and the United States. Mr. Sharmahd's reported arrest comes as relations between the U.S. and Iran remain inflamed in the wake of President Donald Trump's 2018 decision to withdraw America from the 2015 multinational nuclear deal. In January, a U.S. drone strike killed a top Iranian general in Baghdad. Iran responded by launching a ballistic missile attack on U.S. soldiers in Iraq that injured dozens.