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How artificial intelligence is shaping the future of society

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Maria Bartiromo explores the bounds of artificial intelligence usage globally. From health care to the transportation industry, FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo looks at how artificial intelligence (AI) is shaping the future of society. In February the U.S. government launched an American AI initiative, which aims to stimulate AI development. The government's investments in unclassified R&D for AI technologies is up 40 percent since 2015 and for the first time in history, President Trump's fiscal year 2019 budget requests to designate AI and unmanned autonomous systems a priority. However, some say the problem is that China spends much more on AI investment and financing.


AI 50: America's Most Promising Artificial Intelligence Companies

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Artificial intelligence is infiltrating every industry, allowing vehicles to navigate without drivers, assisting doctors with medical diagnoses, and mimicking the way humans speak. But for all the authentic and exciting ways it's transforming the tasks computers can perform, there's a lot of hype, too. As Jeremy Achin, CEO of newly minted unicorn DataRobot, puts it: "Everyone knows you have to have machine learning in your story or you're not sexy." The inherently broad term gets bandied about so often that it can start to feel meaningless and gets trotted out by companies to gussy up even simple data analysis. To help cut through the noise, Forbes and data partner Meritech Capital put together a list of private, U.S.-based companies that are wielding some subset of artificial intelligence in a meaningful way and demonstrating real business potential from doing so. One makes robots that can whir around shoppers to help workers restock shelves. Another scans recruiting pitches for unconscious bias. A third analyzes massive data sets to make street-by-street weather predictions. To be included on the list, companies needed to show that techniques like machine learning (where systems learn from data to improve on tasks), natural language processing (which enables programs to "understand" written or spoken language), or computer vision (which relates to how machines "see") are a core part of their business model and future success. Find all the details on our methodology here.


A Successful Artificial Memory Has Been Created

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We learn from our personal interaction with the world, and our memories of those experiences help guide our behaviors. Experience and memory are inexorably linked, or at least they seemed to be before a recent report on the formation of completely artificial memories. Using laboratory animals, investigators reverse engineered a specific natural memory by mapping the brain circuits underlying its formation. They then "trained" another animal by stimulating brain cells in the pattern of the natural memory. Doing so created an artificial memory that was retained and recalled in a manner indistinguishable from a natural one.


'Alexa, I want to make a political contribution.' Amazon to start voice-controlled donations to 2020 presidential campaigns

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Making a political donation to a presidential campaign is about to get as easy as -- well, saying it out loud. Starting next month, users of voice-controlled home assistant Amazon Alexa will be able to dictate their donations to a 2020 presidential campaign: "Alexa, I want to make a political contribution," or "Alexa, donate [amount] to [candidate name]." Alexa users can make donations of at least $5 and up to $200 to campaigns, and the feature is currently limited to presidential campaigns. Campaigns can sign up starting Thursday. The latest evolution in campaign technology raises new questions about how such contributions will be screened to make sure they are legal.


How artificial intelligence is shaping the future of society

#artificialintelligence

From health care to the transportation industry, FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo looks at how artificial intelligence (AI) is shaping the future of society. In February the U.S. government launched an American AI initiative, which aims to stimulate AI development. The government's investments in unclassified R&D for AI technologies is up 40 percent since 2015 and for the first time in history, President Trump's fiscal year 2019 budget requests to designate AI and unmanned autonomous systems a priority. However, some say the problem is that China spends much more on AI investment and financing. In 2017, AI spending hit $39.5 billion, with China accounting for 70 percent of the expenditures.


Ping An Leads Investment in Riverain Technologies to Advance AI in Healthcare

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Ping An Insurance (Group) Company of China, Ltd. (hereafter "Ping An" or the "Group", HKEX: 2318; SSE: 601318) is pleased to announce Ping An Global Voyager Fund is leading an investment of US$15 Million in Riverain Technologies, a leading provider of clinical artificial intelligence software used to efficiently detect lung disease at its earliest stages. Riverain Technologies markets advanced artificial intelligence imaging software used by leading hospitals around the world. The software significantly improves a clinician's ability to accurately and efficiently detect cancer and other cell anomalies in thoracic CT and X-ray images. The company's suite of patented ClearReadTM software tools are FDA-cleared, deployable in the clinic or in the cloud, and powered by the most advanced artificial intelligence and machine learning methods available to the medical imaging market. Its products are relied upon by leading healthcare institutions, including Duke University, Mayo Clinic, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, and Veterans Affairs hospitals.


Brad Pitt's space epic 'Ad Astra' sets 'new standard' for science fiction films, ex-NASA engineer says

FOX News

Jim Bridenstine says you have to go to the moon to get to Mars. The Brad Pitt-helmed space epic "Ad Astra" sets a new standard for science fiction films, a former NASA engineer who served as a technical consultant for the movie told Fox News. "In my view, it sets a new standard for science fiction films, updating for all to see on the big screen some of the most fantastic imagery we have obtained of our solar system since films like '2001: A Space Odyssey' were released over 50 years ago," said Robert Yowell, who served as an engineer at NASA for 11 years and as a senior mission manager for SpaceX. The new film, set in a future in which humanity has colonized a few far-flung parts of the galaxy but still hasn't reckoned with its own existential torments, is three films rolled cohesively into one: a visually stunning movie about astronauts exploring places like Mars and Jupiter; a poignant father-son tale about coming to grips with abandonment and growing up with a certain kind of dad; and a social commentary on 21st-century concerns over environmental degradation, capitalism and our place in the world. Roy McBride, a man on a mission to the edge of our galaxy that he can't really refuse.


Microsoft boss: tech firms must stop 'if it's legal, it's acceptable' approach

The Guardian

Tech companies should stop behaving as though everything that is not illegal is acceptable, says Microsoft's second-in-command. Instead, they should focus on defining – and living by – the standards that they would like to see in regulation, before it gets forced on them anyway. For some of the most potentially dangerous new technologies, such as facial recognition, that could mean voluntarily refusing to sell them to certain countries, for certain uses, or even agreeing to a moratorium altogether, said Brad Smith, the president and chief legal officer of the world's most valuable publicly-traded company. Speaking to the Guardian before the launch of his new book, Tools and Weapons, Smith said that if technology firms wanted to be proud of how they changed the world for the better, they must take more responsibility for the ways they have made it worse. "When you think about all of the issues that people worry about in the world today and what they spend their time arguing about, it's often issues like trade, immigration, nationalism, globalisation," Smith said.


Google's quantum bet on the future of AI--and what it means for humanity

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The human brain is a funny thing. Certain memories can stick with us forever: the birth of a child, a car crash, an election day. But we only store some details--the color of the hospital delivery room or the smell of the polling station--while others fade, such as the face of the nurse when that child was born, or what we were wearing during that accident. For Google CEO Sundar Pichai, the day he watched AI rise out of a lab is one he'll remember forever. "This was 2012, in a room with a small team, and there were just a few of us," he tells me. An engineer named Jeff Dean, a legendary programmer at Google who helped build its search engine, had been working on a new project and wanted Pichai to have a look. "Anytime Jeff wants to update you on something, you just get excited by it," he says. Pichai doesn't recall exactly which building he was in when Dean presented his work, though odd details of that day have stuck with him. He remembers standing, rather than sitting, and someone joking about an HR snafu that had designated the newly hired Geoffrey Hinton--the "Father of Deep Learning," an AI researcher for four decades, and, later, a Turing Award winner--as an intern.


Tulsi Gabbard says U.S. should re-enter Iran nuclear deal, end sanctions in response to Saudi Arabia drone attack

FOX News

Democratic presidential hopeful Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, said Thursday that she would re-enter the Iran nuclear deal and end sanctions in response to Iran's involvement in drone attack against Saudi Arabia oil facilities if she was president. "What I would do is, I would re-enter the Iran nuclear deal to prevent Iran from continuing to move forward in building a nuclear weapon that puts us and the world further at risk," Gabbard said on "The Story with Martha MacCallum." Every day that we don't do this, every day we continue down this failed strategy Iran gets closer and closer to a nuclear weapon. U.S. officials told Fox News on Tuesday that Iranian cruise missiles and drones were both used in the attack on the two Saudi Arabian oil facilities, and that they were fired from inside southwest Iran this past weekend. Gabbard called the attack a "retaliation" against "extreme sanctions."