Government


Ahead of 2020, Beware the Deepfake

#artificialintelligence

"We are crossing over into an era where we have to be skeptical of what we see on video," says John Villasenor, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Villasenor is talking about deepfakes--videos that are digitally manipulated in imperceptible ways, often using a machine-learning technique that superimposes existing images or audio onto source material. The technology's verisimilitude is alarming, Villasenor argues, because it undermines our perception of truth and could have disastrous consequences for the upcoming U.S. presidential election. "I do think deepfakes are going to be a feature of the 2020 elections in some way," Villasenor says. "And their shadow will be long."


Indian Army set to release AI blueprint soon

#artificialintelligence

In an attempt to match capabilities of adversaries like China, the Indian Army is set to release a blueprint on the setting up of an artificial intelligence system that will reduce human errors and over-dependence on manpower. The AI will be integrated so as to advance surveillance and help mobilise troops quicker, since the army is currently dependent only upon foot patrols in difficult terrains, such as the Chinese frontier. To this end, a seminar is being conducted by the Jaipur-based South Western Command of the Indian Army at Hisar to explore AI based defence applications with experts and industry representatives. It is also intended to be an opportunity to discuss research and development for futuristic weapon platforms.


When Patent 'Professionals' Sound Like Children Who Learned to Parrot Some Intentionally-Misleading Buzzwords, Myths and Lies

#artificialintelligence

Posted in America, Europe, Law, Patents at 12:34 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz Summary: With buzzwords like "AI" and misleading terms like "IP" the litigation zealots are trying to convince themselves (and the public) that software is a physical thing and a "property" which needs "protecting" from "theft"; it doesn't seem to bother these people that copyright law already covers software HOW can a patent office seriously assert that it is serious about innovation when everyone who meets the officials comes from law firms and rarely has any scientific background? If this system's inception truly dates back to need to advance science, shouldn't these officials focus on actual scientists? This may sound like a shallow observation, but it perfectly describes the pattern we've been seeing at the European Patent Office (EPO) under António Campinos and his predecessor Battistelli (neither of whom has any background in the sciences). Seeing how the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) wants to work around 35 U.S.C. § 101, we're nowadays witnessing a similar trend in America too. A resurgence of software patents in Europe poses risk to US (case)law as well.


Top-10 AI Startups in Central and Eastern Europe

#artificialintelligence

Some people think that "sustainable eating" means shopping exclusively at over-priced chains like Whole Foods but we're here to shut that myth down with two words – Almazan Kitchen. Who knew that a couple of Serbian guys cooking organic food in a forest with their pet owl could generate nearly 20 million views for a single video? Serbia is just one of many countries found in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), a region that consists of relatively small countries that gained independence after the collapse of the Soviet Union around 1989. As these countries transformed into democratic states with capitalistic economies only 30 years ago, they had to overcome unique handicaps compared to more developed nations in Western Europe – like no organic grocery stores. Still, most of the region has registered rapid GDP growth over time that was only slowed by the global financial crisis of 2008.


Army wants AI in big way to boost combat lethality India News - Times of India

#artificialintelligence

The South Western Command will be holding a two-day brain-storming session with top military officers, scientists and IT experts on "AI in mechanised (tanks and infantry combat vehicles) warfare" at Hissar next week Rajnath Singh is likely to announce "25 defence-specific AI products" that will be developed by 2024 The South Western Command will be holding a two-day brain-storming session with top military officers, scientists and IT experts on "AI in mechanised (tanks and infantry combat vehicles) warfare" at Hissar next week Rajnath Singh is likely to announce "25 defence-specific AI products" that will be developed by 2024 NEW DELHI: The Army now wants to harness the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) to bolster its combat lethality and survivability, even as the 13-lakh force is testing its new integrated battle groups (IBGs) geared towards mobilising fast and striking hard across the borders. With China taking huge strides in the ongoing global race to develop AI-powered weapon and surveillance systems for futuristic wars, with a special focus on developing lethal autonomous weapon systems (LAWS), India obviously does not want to miss the bus. "China is employing AI (basically simulation of human intelligence processes by computers) in the defence arena in a big way. But we can catch up because we have the required IT (information technology) brains in India. Our aim is to examine how AI can help us become more lethal and effective in our war-fighting in a flexible and dynamic battlefield," said South Western Command (SWC) chief Lt-General Alok Kler, speaking to TOI on Friday.


How artificial intelligence can allow providers to get a better handle on social determinants of health data

#artificialintelligence

Two new and seemingly unrelated approaches to delivering healthcare are starting to take shape in the industry: the use of artificial intelligence, and the integration of social determinants of health in crafting care plans. Both trends are developing independently, but they're likely due to intersect; factoring in SDOH is possible due to data, and if AI shines in any one particular area, it's making sense of complex data sets. If the social determinants are comprised of the socioeconomic factors that can influence a person's health -- income, education, access to transportation, etc. -- then AI has the potential to allow providers to make the best possible use of that information. That becomes increasingly important as value-based care emerges. With reimbursement increasingly tied to health outcomes, providers have a real incentive to ensure they're delivering the best care possible.


CyberSecurity: Machine Learning Artificial Intelligence Actionable Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Overview The goal of artificial intelligence is to enable the development of computers to do things normally done by people -- in particular, things associated with people acting intelligently. In the case of cybersecurity, its most practical application has been automating human intensive tasks to keep pace with attackers! Progressive organizations have begun using artificial intelligence in cybersecurity applications to defend against attackers. However, on it's own, artificial intelligence is best designed to identify "what is wrong." What today's enterprise needs to know is not only "what is wrong" in the face of a breach, but to understand "why it's wrong" and "how to fix it!"


How artificial intelligence is shaping the future of society

#artificialintelligence

Maria Bartiromo explores the bounds of artificial intelligence usage globally. From health care to the transportation industry, FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo looks at how artificial intelligence (AI) is shaping the future of society. In February the U.S. government launched an American AI initiative, which aims to stimulate AI development. The government's investments in unclassified R&D for AI technologies is up 40 percent since 2015 and for the first time in history, President Trump's fiscal year 2019 budget requests to designate AI and unmanned autonomous systems a priority. However, some say the problem is that China spends much more on AI investment and financing.


AI 50: America's Most Promising Artificial Intelligence Companies

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is infiltrating every industry, allowing vehicles to navigate without drivers, assisting doctors with medical diagnoses, and mimicking the way humans speak. But for all the authentic and exciting ways it's transforming the tasks computers can perform, there's a lot of hype, too. As Jeremy Achin, CEO of newly minted unicorn DataRobot, puts it: "Everyone knows you have to have machine learning in your story or you're not sexy." The inherently broad term gets bandied about so often that it can start to feel meaningless and gets trotted out by companies to gussy up even simple data analysis. To help cut through the noise, Forbes and data partner Meritech Capital put together a list of private, U.S.-based companies that are wielding some subset of artificial intelligence in a meaningful way and demonstrating real business potential from doing so. One makes robots that can whir around shoppers to help workers restock shelves. Another scans recruiting pitches for unconscious bias. A third analyzes massive data sets to make street-by-street weather predictions. To be included on the list, companies needed to show that techniques like machine learning (where systems learn from data to improve on tasks), natural language processing (which enables programs to "understand" written or spoken language), or computer vision (which relates to how machines "see") are a core part of their business model and future success. Find all the details on our methodology here.


Anomaly Detection with Unsupervised AI in MixMode: Why Threat Intel Alone is Not Enough - MixMode

#artificialintelligence

Historically, the MixMode platform has provided its users with a forensic hunting platform with intel-based Indicators and Security Events from public & proprietary sources. While these detections still have their place in the security ecosystem, the increase in state-sponsored attacks, insider threats and adversarial artificial intelligence means there are simply too many threats to your network to rely on solely intelligence-based detections or proactive hunting. Many of these threats are sophisticated enough to evade traditional threat detection or, in the case of zero-day threats, signature-based detection may not even be possible. In the face of this growing threat, the best defense is to supplement these traditional methods with anomaly detection, a term that is quickly becoming genericized as it is rapidly bandied about within the industry. Here we will discuss some of the opportunities and challenges that can arise with anomaly detection as well as MixMode's unique approach to the solution.