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Graphcore Launches New Processor, Ups The Ante In Battle For AI Hardware Supremacy

#artificialintelligence

Graphcore, the UK-based AI chipmaker has unveiled new hardware and software innovations that push the boundaries of research and development in AI. The company has announced the second generation of its flagship Intelligence Processing Unit (IPU) chip, the GC200 or the Colossus MK2. According to Graphcore, GC200 is the most complex processor ever made. The IPU chip is at the core of every IPU-Machine M2000, a plug-and-play Machine Intelligence compute blade that has been designed for easy deployment and supports systems that can grow to massive scale. Karl Freund, Senior Analyst at Moor Insights stated, "These developments put Graphcore'first in line to challenge NVIDIA for datacenter AI'." Developed using TSMC's latest 7nm process technology, each chip contains more than 59.4 billion transistors on a single 823sqmm die.


Creator of 'robot chef' makes move on commercial kitchens in the UK

#artificialintelligence

The company behind the world's first AI-powered robot kitchen assistant has announced its debut funding round in the UK in what could be a pivotal step in its quest to get the concept established with restaurant chains here. Miso Robotics – the US creator of the Flippy robot – is aiming to raise £24m via Crowdcube to support its expansion into Europe. The company has previously raised more than $17m (£13m) in funding rounds in the US, following a valuation of over £64m in 2019. Flippy, which cooks burgers, fries and chicken, can learn from its surroundings and acquire new skills and is already deployed in the US market at CaliBurger restaurants and iconic venues such as the Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles through Levy Restaurants, part of Compass Group. This week, Miso Robotics announced that US fast food chain White Castle will deploy Flippy in order to modernise its operations. The fundraising comes at a time when QSRs are having to work even harder to build resilient operations that offer safer working environments as they reopen following the Covid-19 pandemic.


'There's no way back after this': Inside the unexpected tech revolution at the NHS

ZDNet

Technology has been absolutely vital in helping the NHS manage the overwhelming pressure placed on its services since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Everything from video conferencing and remote appointments with GPs through to artificial intelligence systems designed to understand the demand for hospital beds, has been used to help keep healthcare services operating throughout the pandemic. In the early days of the coronavirus crisis, NHS Digital, which is responsible for a number of key digital services for health and social care in the UK, quickly found itself under strain as people began searching for information on COVID-19. In the first week of March alone, the organisation fielded an additional 120,000 calls to its NHS 111 hotline, forcing it to quickly increase capacity and set up an online system where people could check COVID-19 symptoms and get advice. Within a week, more than one million people had used the service; at its peak, NHS 111 online experienced 95 times its highest ever use, with over 818,000 accessing the service in a single day. "No CIO prepares for that," says Sarah Wilkinson, CEO of NHS Digital. The experience was testing for NHS Digital, which had to rapidly scale up services at a pace that, while necessary, Wilkinson admits felt "too fast for comfort" at times.


Prince William, Prince Harry are keeping Zoom chats formal due to security concerns, source claims

FOX News

Prince William and his younger brother Prince Harry are reconnecting after the "Megxit" bombshell that rocked Kensington Palace -- but the royal brothers may have one new obstacle to tackle. "The biggest problem now is security and not just outside security but within the boundaries of calls, Zooms and Skypes," U.K.-based royal correspondent Neil Sean told Fox News. "You have to think that while Harry and Meghan were here in the U.K. there were security measures in place to make sure that private chats over Zoom and so forth remained that -- private," a palace insider told Sean. "Harry is [now] living in [a new house] and exposed to all kinds of mishaps security-wise." The palace insider alleged conversations between William and Harry have been formal out of caution that private chats could be leaked to the press.



Machine Learning Can Help Detect Misinformation Online

#artificialintelligence

As social media is increasingly being used as people's primary source for news online, there is a rising threat from the spread of malign and false information. With an absence of human editors in news feeds and a growth of artificial online activity, it has become easier for various actors to manipulate the news that people consume. RAND Europe was commissioned by the UK Ministry of Defence's (MOD) Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) to develop a method for detecting the malign use of information online. The study was contracted as part of DASA's efforts to help the UK MOD develop its behavioural analytics capability. Our study found that online communities are increasingly being exposed to junk news, cyber bullying activity, terrorist propaganda, and political reputation boosting or smearing campaigns.


DeepMind researchers propose rebuilding the AI industry on a base of anticolonialism

#artificialintelligence

Researchers from Google's DeepMind and the University of Oxford recommend that AI practitioners draw on decolonial theory to reform the industry, put ethical principles into practice, and avoid further algorithmic exploitation or oppression. The researchers detailed how to build AI systems while critically examining colonialism and colonial forms of AI already in use in a preprint paper released Thursday. The paper was coauthored by DeepMind research scientists William Isaac and Shakir Mohammed and Marie-Therese Png, an Oxford doctoral student and DeepMind Ethics and Society intern who previously provided tech advice to the United Nations Secretary General's High-level Panel on Digital Cooperation. The researchers posit that power is at the heart of ethics debates and that conversations about power are incomplete if they do not include historical context and recognize the structural legacy of colonialism that continues to inform power dynamics today. They further argue that inequities like racial capitalism, class inequality, and heteronormative patriarchy have roots in colonialism and that we need to recognize these power dynamics when designing AI systems to avoid perpetuating such harms.


Assassin's Creed Valhalla made me want to visit East Anglia

Engadget

Ahead of Ubisoft's Forward gaming event, the company offered us some remote demos of two of its AAA releases this year. While my colleague had no issues playing Watch Dogs Legion, my substandard internet connection meant my session with Assassin’s Creed Valhalla was taxing. After losing its way with back-to-back-to-back releases in the early-to-mid ‘10s, 2017’s Egypt-based Origins was a return to form for the Assassin’s Creed series, followed a year later by the similarly good Odyssey, which mapped mainland Greece and its many Aegean islands.


'Assassin's Creed Valhalla' puts assassination on the back burner

Mashable

With each new entry and new setting in the Assassin's Creed series, we drift further from where the series began. In Assassin's Creed Valhalla, the shift from assassin to warrior feels like it has completed its metamorphosis. At least that's how it felt when I had a chance to play the game for a few hours during a hands-on preview ahead of Ubisoft Forward on Sunday. Taking control of Eivor, a Norwegian Viking warrior invading England in the ninth century, I accomplished a lot in my time with Valhalla. I raided a village, laid siege to a castle, took out an enemy camp through silent assassination, fought a legendary creature, beat an otherworldly foe in a thoroughly spooky arena, took part in a wedding where I won a drinking competition, and explored a vast section of England that only accounted for a small percentage of the full game's scope. This fight was filled with all kinds of spooky magic.


Assassin's Creed Valhalla hands-on preview: More natural, more serious, more vikings

PCWorld

East Anglia is a world of mud and collapse, of bleak forests and treacherous fens. Quiet except for the sound of iron against iron, the splintering of wooden gates giving way, and everywhere the screams and the yelling. A raid, Vikings stealing ashore to ransack a village and kill everyone that gets in their way. And when all the screaming and yelling is over? The ravens are the only real winners in East Anglia.