Goto

Collaborating Authors

Restaurants


Robot soda jerk from company that brought you Flippy

ZDNet

Robots are coming for fast food, and Miso Robotics is angling to speed up adoption. The company behind the Flippy fry cook robot is moving into beverages with a robotic beverage dispenser, part of a new partnership to bring another robot to your local burger joint. Miso Robotics and Lancer Worldwide, a global beverage dispenser manufacturer are rolling out what's described as an intelligence backed, automated beverage dispenser. "Lancer has consistently supplied the market with dependable products for more than 50 years and there was no question when it came time to decide who to partner with to create an automated beverage dispenser," said Jake Brewer, Chief Strategy Officer of Miso Robotics. Fast food, known more formally as the quick-service restaurant (QSR) industry, has been booming during the pandemic as dine-in options closed or became less popular with diners.


McDonald's being sued in Illinois for collecting customer's biometric data at AI-powered drive-thru

Daily Mail - Science & tech

McDonald's is being sued for recording customers' biometric data at its new artificially intelligent-powered drive-thru windows without getting their consent. In court filings, Shannon Carpenter, a customer at a McDonald's in Lombard, Illinois, claims the system violates Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act, or BIPA, by not getting his approval before using voice-recognition technology to take his order. BIPA requires companies to inform customers their biometric information--including voiceprints, facial features, fingerprints and other unique physiological features--is being collected. Illinois is only one of a handful of states with biometric privacy laws, but they are considered the most stringent. A McDonald's customer in Chicago is suing the burger chain, claiming it records and stores users' voiceprints without their written consent, in violation of Illinois strict biometric privacy law In 2020, the fast-food chain began testing out using voice-recognition software in lieu of human servers at 10 locations in and around Chicago.


Future of Automation: Robots Are Coming But Wont Take Jobs

#artificialintelligence

At the start of the first Terminator movie, Sarah Connor, unknowingly the future mother of Earth's resistance movement, is working as a waitress when Arnold Schwarzenegger's Cyberdyne Systems Model 101 Terminator is sent back through time to kill her. But what if, instead of attempting to murder her, Skynet's android assassin instead approached the owner of Big Jeff's family restaurant, where Sarah worked, and offered to do her shifts for lower wages, while working faster and making fewer mistakes? The newly jobless Sarah, unable to support herself, drops out of college and decides that maybe starting a family in this economic climate just isn't smart. This, in a somewhat cyberbolic nutshell, is the biggest immediate threat many fear when it comes to automation: Not a robopocalypse brought on by superintelligence, but rather one that ushers in an age of technological unemployment. Some very smart people have been sounding the alarm for years. A 2013 study carried out by the Oxford Martin School suggested that some 47% of jobs in the U.S. could be automated within the next two decades -- only 12 years of which now remain following the publishing of the study.


Boston-based AI company launches new drive-thru system called 'Tori'

#artificialintelligence

BOSTON (WHDH) - Boston-based company Open City is launching a new drive-through system called "Tori." "Tori" uses artificial intelligence to take customers' orders with 99 percent accuracy. "It's a really difficult audio environment, you may have birds chirping, you may have kids in the car, you may have loud cars, a lot of different things going on. And that's kind of the magic of what we do, is it just works, and it works every time," Open City CEO Nick Belsito said. Belsito said the new system will not change anything for customers.


The very basics of Reinforcement Learning

#artificialintelligence

So, say if we want to predict the future, rather than using the whole history, we can use the Markov State. The Markov State essentially contains no less information than the history. So, here the probability of getting to a future state St 1 given state St is the same as getting to St 1 given all the previous states. This is because the state St already contains the information about the previous states embedded in it. Say, we have a game in which there is a waiter at a restaurant.


McDonald's Replaces Drive-Thru Human Workers With Siri-Like AI - AI Summary

#artificialintelligence

The fast food giant has been testing out a Siri-like voice-recognition system at ten drive-thru locations in Chicago, CEO Chris Kempczinski revealed during a Wednesday investor conference attended by Nation's Restaurant News. The system can handle about 80 percent of the orders that come its way and fills them with about 85 percent accuracy -- probably annoying for the customers who just want to drive off with their burger -- but Kempczinski says a national rollout could happen in as soon as five years. It raises some interesting questions about the role that AI technology will play in various industries and, more importantly, the seemingly endless debate over whether raising the minimum wage to a livable salary will motivate CEOs to replace humans with machines -- or whether they'd do so to cut costs anyway. Part of the challenge in automating the drive-thru, Kempczinski said, is that human workers have been too eager to help out while supervising the technology that might one day replace them, preventing it from accruing the real-world data crucial for further improving the system. But as restaurant automation grows increasingly common, answering the question of how much responsibility a company has to continue employing people it could technically replace with machines will only grow more important and dire.


McDonald's Replaces Drive-Thru Human Workers With Siri-Like AI

#artificialintelligence

Next time you hit up a McDonald's drive-thru, you might find yourself leaning out your window to bark your order to a robot rather than a pimply teenager. The fast food giant has been testing out a Siri-like voice-recognition system at ten drive-thru locations in Chicago, CEO Chris Kempczinski revealed during a Wednesday investor conference attended by Nation's Restaurant News. The system can handle about 80 percent of the orders that come its way and fills them with about 85 percent accuracy -- probably annoying for the customers who just want to drive off with their burger -- but Kempczinski says a national rollout could happen in as soon as five years. It raises some interesting questions about the role that AI technology will play in various industries and, more importantly, the seemingly endless debate over whether raising the minimum wage to a livable salary will motivate CEOs to replace humans with machines -- or whether they'd do so to cut costs anyway. Part of the challenge in automating the drive-thru, Kempczinski said, is that human workers have been too eager to help out while supervising the technology that might one day replace them, preventing it from accruing the real-world data crucial for further improving the system.


AI & IP In Edge Computing For Faster 5G And The IoT

#artificialintelligence

Edge computing, which is the concept of processing and analyzing data in servers closer to the applications they serve, is growing in popularity and opening new markets for established telecom providers, semiconductor startups, and new software ecosystems. It's brilliant how technology has come together over the last several decades to enable this new space starting with Big Data and the idea that with lots of information, now stored in mega sized data centers, we can analyze the chaos in the world to provide new value to consumers. Combine this concept with IoT and connected everything, from coffee cups to pill dispensers, oil refineries to paper mills, smart goggles to watches, and the value to the consumer could be infinite. However, many argue the market didn't experience the hockey stick growth curves expected for the Internet of Things. The connectivity of the IoT simply didn't bring enough consumer value, except for specific niches. Over the past 5 years, however, technology advancements as artificial intelligence (AI) have begun to revolutionize industries and the concepts of the amount of value that connectivity can provide to consumers.


McDonald's is testing voice recognition software in Chicago for drive-thru orders

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Customers using the drive-thru at 10 McDonald's locations in Chicago are not ordering burgers and fries with human employees, but machines using artificial intelligence. The fast-food chain is testing voice recognition software at select locations that has shown to be 85 percent accurate – but 20 percent of orders need human intervention, CNBC reports. CEO Chris Kempczinski made the announcement Wednesday, but also explained that the software may not roll out to all of the fast-food chain's 14,000 locations. 'Now there's a big leap from going to 10 restaurants in Chicago to 14,000 restaurants across the U.S., with an infinite number of promo permutations, menu permutations, dialect permutations, weather -- and on and on and on,' Kempczinski said, per CNBC. The technology, according to McDonald's, aims to shorten the wait at the drive-thru by a yet to-be determined amount of time.


Peanut the Waiter Robot Is Proof That Your Job Is Safe

WIRED

During a normal April, the owners of the Island Grill would already have a stack of applications to wade through in preparation for the busy Jersey Shore summer. But as the pandemic has waned and business has returned, the applicants haven't lined up. Here in Ocean City, there just aren't enough hands to serve coconut shrimp, quesadillas, and clam chowder in a family-friendly setting. So Allison Yoa, one of the grill's owners, hired Peanut the robot, an autonomous machine that shuttles back and forth from the kitchen delivering food and bussing dirty dishes. It looks like a rolling bookshelf, with four trays, a touchscreen, and an upward-facing infrared camera that scans markings on the ceiling in order to navigate.