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McDonald's being sued in Illinois for collecting customer's biometric data at AI-powered drive-thru

Daily Mail - Science & tech

McDonald's is being sued for recording customers' biometric data at its new artificially intelligent-powered drive-thru windows without getting their consent. In court filings, Shannon Carpenter, a customer at a McDonald's in Lombard, Illinois, claims the system violates Illinois' Biometric Information Privacy Act, or BIPA, by not getting his approval before using voice-recognition technology to take his order. BIPA requires companies to inform customers their biometric information--including voiceprints, facial features, fingerprints and other unique physiological features--is being collected. Illinois is only one of a handful of states with biometric privacy laws, but they are considered the most stringent. A McDonald's customer in Chicago is suing the burger chain, claiming it records and stores users' voiceprints without their written consent, in violation of Illinois strict biometric privacy law In 2020, the fast-food chain began testing out using voice-recognition software in lieu of human servers at 10 locations in and around Chicago.


I Just Watched McDonald's New AI Drive-thru And I've Lost My Appetite - AI Summary

#artificialintelligence

Sadly, I haven't been near Chicago lately and that's where the burger chain is testing this as yet imperfect system -- McDonald's confesses the robot only grasps your order 85% of the time. "Welcome to McDonald's," began exactly the same female robot voice you've heard every time you've tried to get through to a customer service operative at every internet provider/cellphone carrier/just about every business these days. The robot then asks if the customer wants anything else and invites the customer to "please full forward," because no mere human would know to do that. McDonald's is now being sued for allegedly recording voiceprint details of its customers at the robot drive-thru. The lawsuit claims that McDonald's makes the recordings "to be able to correctly interpret customer orders and identify repeat customers to provide a tailored experience."


Synthetic Data: Bridging The Occlusion Gap With Grand Theft Auto

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at the University of Illinois have created a new computer vision dataset that uses synthetic imagery generated by a Grand Theft Auto game engine to help solve one of the thorniest obstacles in semantic segmentation – recognizing objects that are only partly visible in source images and videos. To this end, as described in the paper, the researchers have used the GTA-V video game engine to generate a synthetic dataset that not only features a record-breaking number of occlusion instances, but which features perfect semantic segmentation and labelling, and accounts for temporal information in a way that is not addressed by similar open source datasets. The video below, published as supporting material for the research, illustrates the advantages of a complete 3D understanding of a scene, in that obscured objects are known and exposed in the scene in all circumstances, enabling the evaluating system to learn to associate partial occluded views with the entire (labeled) object. The resulting dataset, called SAIL-VOS 3D, is claimed by the authors to be the first synthetic video mesh dataset with frame-by-frame annotation, instance-level segmentation, ground truth depth for scene views and 2D annotations delineated by bounding boxes. The annotations of SAIL-VOS 3D include depth, instance-level modal and amodal segmentation, semantic labels and 3D meshes.


Bias isn't the only problem with credit scores--and no, AI can't help

MIT Technology Review

But in the biggest ever study of real-world mortgage data, economists Laura Blattner at Stanford University and Scott Nelson at the University of Chicago show that differences in mortgage approval between minority and majority groups is not just down to bias, but to the fact that minority and low-income groups have less data in their credit histories. This means that when this data is used to calculate a credit score and this credit score used to make a prediction on loan default, then that prediction will be less precise. It is this lack of precision that leads to inequality, not just bias. The implications are stark: fairer algorithms won't fix the problem. "It's a really striking result," says Ashesh Rambachan, who studies machine learning and economics at Harvard University, but was not involved in the study.


How AI Is Transforming Venture Capital

#artificialintelligence

AI can transform sourcing and screening from investors' pack mentality, to funding more female founders who build better products and services -- and create higher returns for investors. Venture capitalists know that their advantage lies in identifying the most promising opportunities before their competitors do. This is confirmed by a University of Chicago study by Morten Sorensen, which shows that investors create 60% of their value from the upper part of the funnel, specifically from sourcing and screening. In which case, sourcing and screening must be a constant target for improvement, right? No -- apart from a few VCs who have reinforced their sourcing with web crawlers, sourcing and screening practices have remained the same since the inception of the VC asset class around 1940.


Surgalign Holdings Announces Collaboration with Inteneural Networks, a Leading Developer of Artificial Intelligence for Clinical Neurosciences

#artificialintelligence

DEERFIELD, Ill., June 07, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Surgalign Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: SRGA), a global medical technology company focused on elevating the standard of care through the evolution of digital surgery, and Inteneural Networks Inc., a developer of innovative artificial intelligence (AI) based applications focused on fully autonomous analytics of central nervous system imaging, today announced that they have entered into a strategic collaboration agreement. Under the agreement, Surgalign will gain access to Inteneural's proprietary technology for evaluation of future integration within the Surgalign digital surgery portfolio. Inteneural is the developer and owner of proprietary intellectual property that allows computers to autonomously segment and identify neural structures in medical images and rapidly deliver reference information using machine learning alogrithims. These algorithms have potential for future applications in cranial and neurosurgery for referencing of tumor, aneurysm, stroke, and neurovascular structures using existing magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography technology. "While our initial focus is the application of digital surgery in spine procedures, we have a much more expansive vision for what we believe is possible with emerging technologies. New developments in the application of AI in neurosurgery and medical imaging make it an attractive space to further expand. Inteneural has developed machine learning-based analytics and fully autonomous brain anatomy segmentation capabilities that would be incredibly powerful when combined with neurosurgery," said Terry Rich, Surgalign Chief Executive Officer.


McDonald's Replaces Drive-Thru Human Workers With Siri-Like AI - AI Summary

#artificialintelligence

The fast food giant has been testing out a Siri-like voice-recognition system at ten drive-thru locations in Chicago, CEO Chris Kempczinski revealed during a Wednesday investor conference attended by Nation's Restaurant News. The system can handle about 80 percent of the orders that come its way and fills them with about 85 percent accuracy -- probably annoying for the customers who just want to drive off with their burger -- but Kempczinski says a national rollout could happen in as soon as five years. It raises some interesting questions about the role that AI technology will play in various industries and, more importantly, the seemingly endless debate over whether raising the minimum wage to a livable salary will motivate CEOs to replace humans with machines -- or whether they'd do so to cut costs anyway. Part of the challenge in automating the drive-thru, Kempczinski said, is that human workers have been too eager to help out while supervising the technology that might one day replace them, preventing it from accruing the real-world data crucial for further improving the system. But as restaurant automation grows increasingly common, answering the question of how much responsibility a company has to continue employing people it could technically replace with machines will only grow more important and dire.


McDonald's Replaces Drive-Thru Human Workers With Siri-Like AI

#artificialintelligence

Next time you hit up a McDonald's drive-thru, you might find yourself leaning out your window to bark your order to a robot rather than a pimply teenager. The fast food giant has been testing out a Siri-like voice-recognition system at ten drive-thru locations in Chicago, CEO Chris Kempczinski revealed during a Wednesday investor conference attended by Nation's Restaurant News. The system can handle about 80 percent of the orders that come its way and fills them with about 85 percent accuracy -- probably annoying for the customers who just want to drive off with their burger -- but Kempczinski says a national rollout could happen in as soon as five years. It raises some interesting questions about the role that AI technology will play in various industries and, more importantly, the seemingly endless debate over whether raising the minimum wage to a livable salary will motivate CEOs to replace humans with machines -- or whether they'd do so to cut costs anyway. Part of the challenge in automating the drive-thru, Kempczinski said, is that human workers have been too eager to help out while supervising the technology that might one day replace them, preventing it from accruing the real-world data crucial for further improving the system.


Beazley Insurance

#artificialintelligence

Exhibitioners at the Century of Progress International Exposition held in Chicago from 1933-1934 touted washing machines and air conditioners as capable of bringing vast changes to our everyday lives. This optimism for future generations is inherent within the human psyche. As such, we often speak of artificial intelligence ("AI") as a lofty, almost dream-like reality that awaits us in the not-so-distant future. But AI proliferates today and extends beyond the entertainment-based efficiencies embedded within Netflix and TikTok that we read about; attorneys apply AI to document review projects; vehicle manufacturers use AI to control a vehicle's acceleration, speed and steering; hospitals and doctors are using AI to triage and diagnose patients; and biotech companies increasingly rely on AI to model the potential success of newly developed therapies and vaccines. Insurance carriers remain optimistic about the efficiencies to be gained by implementing AI-based applications into their workflows.


How wearable AI could help you recover from covid

MIT Technology Review

Angela Mitchell still remembers the night she nearly died. It was almost one year ago in July. Mitchell--who turns 60 this June--tested positive for covid-19 at her job as a pharmacy technician at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago. She was sneezing, coughing, and feeling dizzy. The hospital management offered her a choice.