Face Recognition


Amazon Says It Can Detect Fear on Your Face. You Scared?

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Amazon announced a breakthrough from its AI experts Monday: Their algorithms can now read fear on your face, at a cost of $0.001 per image--or less if you process more than 1 million images. The news sparked interest because Amazon is at the center of a political tussle over the accuracy and regulation of facial recognition. Amazon sells a facial-recognition service, part of a suite of image-analysis features called Rekognition, to customers that include police departments. Another Rekognition service tries to discern the gender of faces in photos. The company said Monday that the gender feature had been improved--apparently a response to research showing it was much less accurate for people with darker skin.


The EU wants strict controls on facial recognition TheINQUIRER

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DESPITE HAVING SERIOUS problems with bias, raising enormous privacy concerns, and not actually being very reliable, businesses and services seem to be tripping over themselves to get on board the facial recognition train. The EU, it seems, plans to put some much needed brakes on this metaphorical choo-choo, and is planning to put strict limits on "the indiscriminate use of facial recognition technology" in order to protect European citizens. Documents seen by the Financial Times say the new legislation will "set a world-standard for AI regulations" with "clear, predictable and uniform rules… which adequately protect individuals." "AI applications can pose significant risks to fundamental rights," it continues. "Unregulated AI systems may take decisions affecting citizens without explanation, possibility of recourse or even a responsible interlocutor."


Facial recognition technique could improve hail forecasts

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The shape of a severe storm, such as this one, is an important factor in whether the storm produces hail and how large the hailstones are, but current hail-prediction techniques are typically not able to take the storm's entire structure into account. NCAR scientists are experimenting with a new machine-learning technique that can process images to weigh the impact of storm shape and potentially improve hail forecasts. This image is freely available for media and nonprofit use.) The same artificial intelligence technique typically used in facial recognition systems could help improve prediction of hailstorms and their severity, according to a new study from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Instead of zeroing in on the features of an individual face, scientists trained a deep learning model called a convolutional neural network to recognize features of individual storms that affect the formation of hail and how large the hailstones will be, both of which are notoriously difficult to predict.


Using facial recognition technology for hailstorms

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Technology similar to what Facebook uses for recommending what friends you should "tag" may soon be coming to hailstorms. David Gagne, a machine learning scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, is using facial recognition technology to unlock the secrets behind big hail. "I'm using artificial intelligence techniques to predict the size of hailstorms," explained Gagne. Working with computer-simulated storms, he created software that is trained to determine which storms produce hail and then to recognize patterns associated with the storms behind the largest hailstones. "The shape of storms is really important."



Face Recognition Lets Palestinians Cross Israeli Checkposts Fast, But Raises Concerns

NPR Technology

A Palestinian man uses a biometric gate as he crosses into Israel at the Qalandia crossing in Jerusalem in July. Israel's military has invested tens of millions of dollars to upgrade West Bank crossings and ease entry for Palestinian workers. But critics slam the military's use of facial recognition technology as problematic. A Palestinian man uses a biometric gate as he crosses into Israel at the Qalandia crossing in Jerusalem in July. Israel's military has invested tens of millions of dollars to upgrade West Bank crossings and ease entry for Palestinian workers.


Facial Recognition, Robotic Process Automation Companies Among Most-Funded AI Startups

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Artificial intelligence startups, especially facial recognition and robotic process automation companies, are attracting major investments, with one AI developer receiving total funding of $1.63 billion, according to a recently published research report. CB Insights last week released a study on what it saw as the 100 most promising AI startups. As part of the report, the researcher included a list of what it found to be the most well-funded young companies. Many were developing automation tools, but CB Insights also included...


Bernie Sanders wants to ban police use of facial recognition

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Fox News Flash top headlines for August 19 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Bernie Sanders has called for a complete ban on the police use of facial recognition. The Vermont senator's proposal to "ban the use of facial recognition software for policing" is part of his broader criminal justice reform agenda. Facial recognition technology has drawn the ire of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, some of whom have called for a "time out" on its development.


How A Tip -- And Facial Recognition Technology -- Helped The FBI Catch A Killer

NPR Technology

An FBI agent displays seized firearms from a gang investigation. Digital facial recognition helped the bureau track down an MS-13 member wanted in connection with murder. An FBI agent displays seized firearms from a gang investigation. Digital facial recognition helped the bureau track down an MS-13 member wanted in connection with murder. Walter Yovany-Gomez evaded authorities for years before the FBI put him on its Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list.


Biometric Data Regulations: Do Your Insurance Policies Cover This Emerging Risk? JD Supra

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Over the past several years, commercial use of biometric data has become increasingly prevalent. In response, several states have adopted biometric data privacy legislation. Consequently, companies that rely on biometric data face new regulatory risks, in addition to increased legal exposure to individual and class action lawsuits. In fact, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently affirmed certification of a class action alleging Facebook's face-scanning practices violate Illinois' biometric privacy law, finding that the class alleged sufficiently concrete injuries based on Facebook's alleged use of facial recognition technology without users' consent to establish standing. Insurance policies currently available on the market, including cyber insurance policies, may not adequately cover these risks.