Drones


'Neural Lander' uses AI to land drones smoothly

#artificialintelligence

Landing multi-rotor drones smoothly is difficult. Complex turbulence is created by the airflow from each rotor bouncing off the ground as the ground grows ever closer during a descent. This turbulence is not well understood nor is it easy to compensate for, particularly for autonomous drones. That is why takeoff and landing are often the two trickiest parts of a drone flight. Drones typically wobble and inch slowly toward a landing until power is finally cut, and they drop the remaining distance to the ground.


How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen

NYT > Middle East

Visual Investigations Latest Video 10:45 How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:57 How an Elite Nigerian Unit Killed Dozens of Protesters Visual Investigations Latest Video 6:52 A Black Driver, a Marijuana Bust and a Body Camera That Turned Off Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:32 Killing Khashoggi: How a Brutal Saudi Hit Job Unfolded Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers. Visual Investigations Latest Video 7:07 How a Gang Hunted and Killed a 15-Year-Old in the Bronx Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:48 How a C.I.A. Drone Base Grew in the Desert Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:49 How Surveillance Cameras Tracked Two Russian Hit Men Visual Investigations Latest Video 3:04 How the Drone Attack on Maduro Unfolded in Venezuela Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers.


How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen

NYT > Middle East

Visual Investigations Latest Video 10:43 How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:57 How an Elite Nigerian Unit Killed Dozens of Protesters Visual Investigations Latest Video 6:52 A Black Driver, a Marijuana Bust and a Body Camera That Turned Off Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:32 Killing Khashoggi: How a Brutal Saudi Hit Job Unfolded Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers. Visual Investigations Latest Video 7:07 How a Gang Hunted and Killed a 15-Year-Old in the Bronx Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:48 How a C.I.A. Drone Base Grew in the Desert Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:49 How Surveillance Cameras Tracked Two Russian Hit Men Visual Investigations Latest Video 3:04 How the Drone Attack on Maduro Unfolded in Venezuela Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers.


Ford's self-driving cars may have delivery robots because humans are too lazy

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for May 22 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Ford is developing self-driving delivery vehicles it plans to launch in 2021, but there's a problem. If there isn't a driver, who's going to bring the package or pizza to your door? In tests with faux-autonomous Domino's Pizza cars, Ford discovered that a lot of people were simply too lazy to make the trip to the curb to get their orders from the car themselves, so it came up with the obvious solution: robots.


Testing the ability of unmanned aerial systems and machine learning to map weeds at subfield scales: a test with the weed Alopecurus myosuroides (Huds) - Lambert - - Pest Management Science - Wiley Online Library

#artificialintelligence

The core objective of plant population ecology is to understand changes in numbers of individuals/organisms across time and space.1 Achieving this depends on methods that permit plants to be mapped and monitored at informative scales.2-4 Surveys of plant populations have been undertaken using a variety of different methods such as transect sampling, quadrat sampling and with unmanned aerial systems (UAS).5-7 Each of these methods has an inherent trade‐off between the area that can be surveyed and the intensity at which the subjects in that area can be studied.8 Transect and quadrat sampling can be used for either small area, high‐intensity studies or large area, low‐intensity studies, but typically not both.9 UAS present a unique opportunity for ecological monitoring because, potentially, they can yield data across both large spatial areas and at high survey intensity.


US warns about alleged spying threat from Chinese-made drones

FOX News

The US government is warning businesses about the risks of using Chinese-made aerial drones on claims they may pose a spying threat. On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security issued an industry alert over the alleged spying dangers, according to CNN. The alert doesn't name a specific company, but one of the biggest drone manufacturers in the world is DJI, which is based in Shenzhen, China. The department is worried the drone technologies can collect information and secretly send it back to their manufacturers in China. If this occurs, the Chinese government has the power to compel the manufacturer to hand over all the acquired data.


Iran quadruples production of low-enriched uranium: reports

The Japan Times

TEHRAN - Iran has quadrupled its production of low-enriched uranium amid tensions with the U.S. over Tehran's unraveling nuclear accord, two semi-official news agencies reported Monday, an announcement just after President Donald Trump warned Iran it would face its "official end" if it threatened America again. While the reports said the production is of uranium enriched only to the 3.67 percent limit set by the 2015 nuclear deal that Tehran reached with world powers, it means that Iran soon will go beyond the stockpile limitations established by the accord. This follows days of heightened tensions sparked by the Trump administration's deployment of bombers and an aircraft carrier to the Persian Gulf over still-unspecified threats from Iran. While Trump's dueling approach of flattery and threats has become a hallmark of his foreign policy, the risks have only grown in dealing with Iran, where mistrust between Tehran and Washington stretch back four decades. So far this month, officials in the United Arab Emirates alleged that four oil tankers sustained damage in a sabotage attack; Yemeni rebels allied with Iran launched a drone attack on an oil pipeline in Saudi Arabia; and U.S. diplomats relayed a warning that commercial airlines could be misidentified by Iran and attacked, something dismissed by Tehran.


Saudis say they don't want war with Iran but will defend themselves

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Saudi Arabia does not want war but will not hesitate to defend itself against Iran, a top Saudi diplomat said Sunday, after the kingdom's energy sector was targeted this past week amid heightened tensions in the Persian Gulf. On Sunday night, a rocket crashed in the Iraqi capital's heavily fortified Green Zone, landing less than a mile from the U.S. Embassy, further stoking tensions. No casualties were reported in the apparent attack. Adel al-Jubeir, the minister of state for foreign affairs, spoke a week after four oil tankers-- two of them Saudi-- were targeted in an alleged act of sabotage off the coast of the United Arab Emirates and days after Iran-allied Yemeni rebels claimed a drone attack on a Saudi oil pipeline. "The kingdom of Saudi Arabia does not want war in the region and does not strive for that … but at the same time, if the other side chooses war, the kingdom will fight this with all force and determination and it will defend itself, its citizens and its interests," al-Jubeir told reporters.


Alphabet-owned Wing will begin making drone deliveries in Finland next month

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Wing, an offshoot of Google's parent company, Alphabet, will launch drone deliveries to one of Finland's most populous areas next month according to a recent blog post from the company. Pilot deliveries will be rolled out in the Vousari district of Finland's capital, Helsinki, and will deliver products from gourmet supermarket Herkku foods and Cafe Monami. As noted by Wing, deliveries will include'fresh Finnish pastries, meatballs for two, and a range of other meals and snacks' that can be delivered in minutes. Wing will launch deliveries for customers in Finland starting next month. Wing, the first commercial drone company approved by the FAA in the U.S. will start delivering in Virginia.


Bomb-laden drones of Yemen's Houthi rebels seen threatening Arabian Peninsula

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - A Yemen rebel drone strike this week on a critical Saudi oil pipeline shows that the otherwise-peaceful sandy reaches of the Arabian Peninsula now are at risk of similar assault, including an under-construction nuclear power plant and Dubai International Airport, among the world's busiest. U.N. investigators said the Houthis' new UAV-X drone, found in recent months during the Saudi-led coalition's war in Yemen, likely has a range of up to 1,500 km (930 miles). That puts the far reaches of both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, the two main opponents of the Iranian-allied Houthi rebels in Yemen, within reach of drones difficult to detect and track. Their relatively simple design, coupled with readily available information online, makes targeting even easier, analysts say. "These installations are easily findable, like on Google Earth," said Tim Michetti, an expert on illicit weapons technology with experience in Yemen.