North America Government


Biometric Data Regulations: Do Your Insurance Policies Cover This Emerging Risk? JD Supra

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Over the past several years, commercial use of biometric data has become increasingly prevalent. In response, several states have adopted biometric data privacy legislation. Consequently, companies that rely on biometric data face new regulatory risks, in addition to increased legal exposure to individual and class action lawsuits. In fact, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently affirmed certification of a class action alleging Facebook's face-scanning practices violate Illinois' biometric privacy law, finding that the class alleged sufficiently concrete injuries based on Facebook's alleged use of facial recognition technology without users' consent to establish standing. Insurance policies currently available on the market, including cyber insurance policies, may not adequately cover these risks.


Who Is Winning the AI Race: China, the EU or the United States?

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The United States Geological Survey confirmed with the Center for Data Innovation over email on July 22, 2019, that "1-meter DEMs are available or in progress for 45% of the country."


Surveillance cameras in parts of Pennsylvania use hackable Chinese tech and can recognize faces

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Their lifeless eyes peer from building facades, lampposts and streetlight poles. They never sleep, never even blink. And now, enabled by advances in computing power and artificial intelligence, surveillance cameras can do more than just watch. They can recognize, and they can remember. The district attorney for Pennsylvania's second-most-populous county has assembled a network of advanced surveillance cameras in and around Pittsburgh and has enlisted colleagues in four surrounding counties to extend its reach into their jurisdictions.


What's the best way for the Pentagon to invest in artificial intelligence?

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A deep dive into the numbers shows an early emphasis on basic research. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's budget request includes $138 million for advanced land systems technology, up from $109 million in fiscal 2019. That program includes research into urban reconnaissance and AI-driven subterranean operations. DARPA's budget also includes $10 million for the Highly Networked Dissemination of Relevant Data Project, a situational awareness tool, as well as $161 million for the AI Human Machine Symbiosis Project, up from $97 million.


US Army Developing AI-Guided Long-Range Smart Artillery Shell

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The Cannon-Delivered Area Effects Munitions (C-DAEM) is a new 155-millimeter artillery round in development for the Army's M777 howitzer, M109A6 Paladin self-propelled howitzer and new XM1299 self-propelled howitzer. The high-tech shell will be able to guide itself toward its intended target, even in areas where GPS is jammed by enemy forces. The munition, which has a 43-mile range, will take more than a minute to reach its target, and can slow down and guide itself on the way. By doing so, it makes it easier for the Army to hit targets that move around, like vehicles and infantry - although it can't hit a moving target yet. Popular Mechanics notes that C-DAEM will replace the dual purpose improved conventional munition (DPICM), a type of cluster munition that made up for a lack of precision accuracy by scattering bomblets above the battlefield, ensuring it would at least do some damage to its target even if it didn't hit it directly.


Facial recognition scanners are already at some US airports. Here's what to know

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Many airports hope to start using biometric scanners in lieu of passports to identify travelers. Buzz60's Tony Spitz has the details. The next time you go to the airport you might notice something different as part of the security process: A machine scanning your face to verify your identity. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has been working with airlines to implement biometric face scanners in domestic airports to better streamline security. But how does the process work?


Self-Driving Vehicles a Reality Today With Optimus Ride's Autonomous System

#artificialintelligence

Optimus Ride has already deployed its autonomous transportation systems in the Seaport area of Boston, in a mixed-use development in South Weymouth, Massachusetts, and in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, a 300-acre industrial park. Some of the biggest companies in the world are spending billions in the race to develop self-driving vehicles that can go anywhere. Meanwhile, Optimus Ride, a startup out of MIT, is already helping people get around by taking a different approach. The company's autonomous vehicles only drive in areas it comprehensively maps, or geofences. Self-driving vehicles can safely move through these areas at about 25 miles per hour with today's technology.


Hundreds of Google employees urge company to resist support for Ice

The Guardian

Tech giant Google is facing a demand from hundreds of employees for an assurance that it will not bid on a government cloud computing contract that could be used to enforce US immigration policies on the southern border. A group of employees called Googlers for Human Rights posted a public petition overnight Thursday urging the company to resist tendering for a US Customs and Border Protection or Immigration and Customs Enforcement contract. It is not clear if Google or its parent Alphabet has already applied – the application deadline was 1 August – but the tech giant has previously drawn employee protests after signing cloud-computing or data storage deals with the government. The company confirmed in March 2018 that it was involved with Project Maven, a $250m Department of Defense artificial intelligence initiative designed to provide 3D mapping that could be used for improved drone-strike battlefield accuracy. Over 3,000 Google employees signed a petition in protest against the company's involvement.


US Army is working on AI-guided missiles that 'pick their OWN targets'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The U.S. government is spending millions of dollars on creating intelligent missiles - which will determine for targets for themselves. The Cannon-Delivered Area Effects Munition (C-DAEM) system will use GPS to identify enemy tanks and armoured shells, which will be scanned in advance from the skies. According to sources, the Pentagon will invest vast sums into the AI-guided munitions, which could be ready by 2021. They will replace the Dual-Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) artillery rounds, which were introduced in the 1980s. Cannon-Delivered Area Effects Munition system: The U.S. government is spending millions of dollars on creating intelligent missiles - which will determine for targets for themselves C-DAEM is a 155-millimeter artillery shell, and will be available for the M777 towed howitzer, the M109A6 Paladin self-propelled howitzer, and the new XM1299 self-propelled howitzer, which has a range of up to 43 miles.


Hundreds of Google employees call for company to avoid work with ICE and CBP

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

After 9/11, the U.S. enforced stricter control on immigration. This enforcement led to the birth of Homeland Security and ICE, but what is ICE exactly? SAN FRANCISCO – Hundreds of Google employees are calling on the company to pledge it won't work with U.S. Customs and Border Protection or Immigration and Customs Enforcement. A group of employees called Googlers for Human Rights posted a public petition urging the company not to bid on a cloud computing contract for CBP, the federal agency that oversees law enforcement for the country's borders. Bids for the contract were due Aug. 1.