Military


Air Force Contracts MIT for Artificial Intelligence Research

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A new contract with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will bring airmen from across Air Force career fields to work with researchers on artificial intelligence technology. The project will focus on research in AI projects including decision support, maintenance and logistics, talent management, medical readiness, situational awareness, business operations and disaster relief, according to a news release. The effort is part of the service's science and technology strategy. Similar partnerships around the U.S. focus on other innovations.


F-35 and F-15EX fighter could get drone wingmen in coming years as part of the Skyborg programme

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Unmanned drones, powered by artificial intelligence, may soon accompany US Air Force Pilots on missions as autonomous wingmen. Both Boeing's F-15 and Lockheed Martin's F-35 fighter jets are being considered for the'Skyborg' drone support program. The scheme would cut down on the amount of people in the jets and could both reduce the risk to pilots and be more economical. Drones can be manufactured for a fortieth of the cost of a new fighter jet and may be guided by the sole pilot inside the nearby fighter plane. To safely manage any such drones, however, AI will need to be sufficiently developed to make it immune to attacks that could exploit its operating features.


Using machine learning to 'automate' employee expertise Federal News Network

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Machine learning and artificial intelligence were intended to make people more productive, not replace them. The tools are ultimately aimed at engineers who want to develop ways to solve problems more efficiently, at least that's how the Advanced Research Projects Agency -- Energy (ARPA-E) sees it. Engineers have long had tools such as computer-aided design and a lot of vendors provide CAD modeling software. But ARPA-E is going beyond that. Program Director David Tew said his agency hopes to "automate" the intuition and expertise that engineers bring to the table.


The Internet of Healthcare: A Future Beyond Digital Transformation

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Did you know that one-third of every dollar spent in healthcare today is used for high-volume and repetitive data-driven administrative processes? The challenge has grown from the digitization of the healthcare industry, but new technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) may also prove to be the answer. I recently came across a company called Olive that builds artificial intelligence and RPA solutions that empower healthcare organizations to improve efficiency and patient care while reducing costly administrative errors. I invited Sean Lane, CEO and Co-Founder at Olive to share his expertise in and insights. Sean is a technology entrepreneur with a deep background in national security and healthcare.


US government is funding research into technology that will connect soldiers' brains to computers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is funding research that could give a future generation of soldiers the power to control machines and weapons with their minds. The agency said it will fund six organizations through the Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3) program who will work to design and build interfaces for application in the U.S. military, that could be worn be soldiers and translate their brain signals into instructions. Those instructions could be used to control swarms of unmanned aerial vehicles, wield cyber defense systems, or facilitate military communications. Soldiers may be able to control vehicles and more by using only their minds under a new initiative from the U.S. Department of Defense. While the feat may sound firmly in the realm of science fiction, according to DARPA it is setting a completion date within four years.



Lifelong Learning in Artificial Neural Networks

Communications of the ACM

Columbia University is learning how to build and train self-aware neural networks, systems that can adapt and improve by using internal simulations and knowledge of their own structures. The University of California, Irvine, is studying the dual memory architecture of the hippocampus and cortex to replay relevant memories in the background, allowing the systems to become more adaptable and predictive while retaining previous learning. Tufts University is examining an intercellular regeneration mechanism observed in lower animals such as salamanders to create flexible robots capable of adapting to changes in their environment by altering their structures and functions on the fly. SRI International is developing methods to use environmental signals and their relevant context to represent goals in a fluid way rather than as discrete tasks, enabling AI agents to adapt their behavior on the go.


The US Air Force is enlisting MIT to help sharpen its AI skills

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It's not yet clear how this collaboration will go down, especially since the military's previous efforts to collaborate with industry have proved problematic. Most notably, a project involving Google's Cloud AI team, established through a program known as Maven, sparked a backlash among employees. This involved using the Cloud platform to identify objects in aerial images, and some worried that it could eventually lead to using AI to target weapons. As a result, Google chose not to renew its contract with the Air Force and issued a new AI code of ethics, which precludes working on technology that could be weaponized.


Research indicates the only defense against killer AI is not developing it

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A recent analysis on the future of warfare indicates that countries that continue to develop AI for military use risk losing control of the battlefield. Those that don't risk eradication. Here's what that means, according to a trio of experts. Researchers from ASRC Federal, a private company that provides support for the intelligence and defense communities, and the University of Maryland recently published a paper on pre-print server ArXiv discussing the potential ramifications of integrating AI systems into modern warfare. Get 50% off tickets if you buy now.


Canny AI: Imagine world leaders singing

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Deep Learning is really starting to establish itself as a major new tool in visual effects. Currently the tools are still in their infancy but they are changing the way visual effects can be approached. Instead of a pipeline consisting of modelling, texturing, lighting and rendering, these new approaches are hallucinating or plausibly creating imagery that is based on training data sets. Machine Learning, the superset of Deep Learning and similar approaches have had great success in image classification, image recognition and image synthesis. At fxguide we covered Synthesia in the UK, a company born out of research first published as Face2Face.