Rhode Island


A Confused Police Officer Pulled Over a Self-Driving Vehicle on Its First Day Carrying Passengers

TIME - Tech

A self-driving shuttle got pulled over by police on its first day carrying passengers on a new Rhode Island route. Providence Police Chief Hugh Clements says an officer pulled over the odd-looking autonomous vehicle because he had never seen one before. The bus-like vehicle operated by Michigan-based May Mobility was dropping off passengers Wednesday morning when a police cruiser arrived with blinking lights and a siren. It was just hours after the public launch of a state-funded pilot shuttle service. The shuttle offers free rides on a 12-stop urban loop.


Curious cop pulls over self-driving vehicle on passenger-carrying project's debut day

The Japan Times

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND - A self-driving shuttle got pulled over by police on its first day carrying passengers on a new Rhode Island route. Providence Police Chief Hugh Clements said an officer pulled over the odd-looking autonomous vehicle because he had never seen one before. "It looked like an oversize golf cart," Clements said. The vehicle, operated by Michigan-based May Mobility, was dropping off passengers Wednesday morning at Providence's Olneyville Square when a police cruiser arrived with blinking lights and a siren. It was just hours after the public launch of a state-funded pilot for a shuttle service called "Little Roady."


Why did a Rhode Island police officer pull over a self-driving shuttle on its first day?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Elizabeth Keatinge tells us about Tesla's Autonomy Investor Day where robotaxis were discussed. PROVIDENCE, R.I. – A self-driving shuttle got pulled over by police on its first day carrying passengers on a new Rhode Island route. Providence Police Chief Hugh Clements said an officer pulled over the odd-looking autonomous vehicle because he had never seen one before. "It looked like an oversize golf cart," Clements said. The vehicle, operated by Michigan-based May Mobility, was dropping off passengers Wednesday morning at Providence's Olneyville Square when a police cruiser arrived with blinking lights and a siren.


GoLocalProv News RIDOT Begins Testing for Autonomous Vehicle Pilot Project

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"This is a very exciting day as we kick-off testing of autonomous vehicles, putting Rhode Island on the map as a leader in this new high-tech field in transportation. And we'll do it in a careful and safe manner partnering with institutions of higher education to carefully study and evaluate the service and its integration on Rhode Island roads," said Governor Gina Raimondo. The vehicles are being tested this week on low-volume roads in the park as the beginning phase of a pilot project scheduled to launch in Providence in the spring of 2019. The testing period in Quonset will be followed by similar testing in Providence, prior to the start of service. Between the two locations, the vehicles will undergo 500 miles of testing.


Congress grills Google CEO over Chinese search engine plans

Engadget

If you were hoping that Google chief Sundar Pichai would shed more light on his company's potential censored search engine for China... well, you'll mostly be disappointed. Rhode Island Representative David Cicilline grilled Pichai on the recently acknowledged Dragonfly project and mostly encountered attempts to downplay the significance of the engine. The Google exec stressed there were "no plans" to launch a search engine for China, and that Dragonfly was an "internal effort" and "limited" in scope. Pichai added that Google was "currently not in discussions" with Chinese officials. He also provided a non-committal answer when asked if Google would promise not to create a tool enabling Chinese surveillance.


This college opened a one-of-a-kind AI lab - eCampus News

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What if a special lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) could educate the community on the ethical, technological, and social consequences of artificial intelligence (AI)? That's what Karim Boughida, dean of the URI Libraries, is counting on with a unique AI lab in the Robert L. Carothers Library at URI. Students, faculty members, state officials, business people, and community members can all use the lab for answers. And although AI labs have been around for decades, this is the first-of-its-kind in a common area, open to the public. The lab's goals are two-fold: How the lab operates Funded by a $143,065 grant from the Champlin Foundation, the lab has a Nvidia supercomputer as its centerpiece. It includes software-focused makerspaces and design-thinking labs, creating a multidisciplinary environment that's rare in academic buildings, Boughida says.


Anixa Biosciences to Present at Artificial Intelligence Conference

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Anixa Biosciences, Inc. (NASDAQ: ANIX), a biotechnology company focused on using the body's immune system to fight cancer, today announced that it will present data from its ongoing studies utilizing Cchek, Anixa's artificial intelligence (AI) driven early cancer detection technology, at the 30th Anniversary AACR Special Conference – Convergence: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data and Prediction in Cancer. This AACR special conference will cover the state of research in understanding cancer from incident to early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment using big data and machine learning. The meeting will be held October 14–17, 2018 in Newport, Rhode Island and will attended by global leaders in the intersection of cancer research and artificial intelligence. To receive a copy of the presentation, please email your request to AACR-AI-2018@anixa.com starting October 17, 2018 and include your name, title, and contact information. "We are pleased to be presenting our latest data on Cchek at this special Artificial Intelligence conference.


University of Rhode Island (URI) Opens First AI Lab Housed in a University Library

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Gary Price (gprice@mediasourceinc.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area. Before launching INFOdocket, Price and Shirl Kennedy were the founders and senior editors at ResourceShelf and DocuTicker for 10 years. From 2006-2009 he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com, and is currently a contributing editor at Search Engine Land.


The dangers of AI challenge even the experts

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At the Re-Work Deep Learning Summit in Boston today, a panel of ethicists and engineers discussed some of the biggest challenges facing artificial intelligence: algorithmic biases, ethics in AI, and whether the tools to create AI should be made widely available. The panel included Simon Mueller, cofounder and vice president of think tank The Future Society; Cansu Canca, founder and director of the AI Ethics Lab; Gabriele Fariello, a Harvard instructor in machine learning, researcher in neuroinformatics, and chief information officer at the University of Rhode Island; and Kathy Pham, a Google, IBM, and United States Digital Service alum who's currently researching ethics at the Artificial Intelligence and Software Engineering at Harvard Berkman Klein Center and MIT Media Lab. Mueller kicked off the discussion with a thorny question: Is ethics the most pressing problem for the progress of AI? "It's always an'engineering first and solve the tech problem first' attitude [when it comes to AI]," Pham said. "There are a lot of experts out there who have been thinking about this, [but] those voices need to be recognized as just as valuable as the engineers in the room." Canca agreed that ethics aren't discussed among product leads and designers as often as they should be.


BJ's baffling mobile right-swipe machine-learning move

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When BJ's Wholesale Club on Thursday (May 3) said that it would leverage artificial intelligence machine learning in its mobile app, it joined the crowded club of companies boasting machine-learning capabilities while remaining vague on the details. But the 215-store chain -- operating in Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia -- pledged to use machine learning to boost its CRM shopper profiles and to immediately apply it to change mobile responses. "The new discover feature lets shoppers explore new products and easily swipe right to add to a wishlist or left to dismiss a product," the chain said in one of the shortest news releases that retail has ever seen. "Using machine learning, the discover experience will be personalized to each user based on previous selections they've made through the swipe right or left process." Why do I find this so interesting?