Asia



What leaders need to know about AI

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Organizations today are focused on identifying avenues to introduce AI into daily tasks and deliverables. While the common perception is that it creates a sense of insecurity among employees, contrary to this belief, employees are in fact more receptive and ready to deploy AI into their work, a study by Dale Carnegie reveals. During a roundtable discussion on "Preparing people for the Human Machine Partnerships of the future," conducted by Dale Carnegie in New Delhi, experts explored ways in which industry leaders can incorporate AI technology into their HR Tech, performance feedback systems, upskilling initiatives, etc. The panel discussion was led by Dale Carnegie representatives including Pallavi Jha, MD & Chairperson, Dale Carnegie of India; Mark Marone, Director - Research & Thought Leadership, Dale Carnegie and Associates; Juliette Dennett, Managing Director, Dale Carnegie Northern England; and Jordan Wang, Managing Director New South Wales, Dale Carnegie Australia. The survey that saw participation from 3,846 respondents across 13 countries, aimed to assess the readiness of the global workforce to accept AI in their work, feedback systems, skilling needs, etc., highlighted that 42 percent of the organizations globally are already using AI in one form or the other.


Lessons From Implementing AI In A People Business

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Charles Brayne is EY's UK Chief Tax Innovation Officer and Partner and has a dual role. On the one hand, he works with clients to help them adopt new tax technologies and on the other, he oversees the implementation of AI technologies within EY's own tax business. Meanwhile, as EY's UK Chief Tax Data Scientist, Harvey Lewis works directly with tax and law professionals to create and deliver new AI tools and applications, as well as provide strategic oversight for their automation projects. In this keynote, Charles and Harvey discuss EY's lessons from implementing AI within their own organisation. With flagship shows in San Francisco, London, New York, Munich, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Cape Town, 2019 will see over 30,000 delegates from businesses globally joining the AI revolution through The AI Summit events.


Deep learning AI may identify atrial fibrillation from a normal rhythm ECG - Times of India

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Although early and requiring further research before implementation, the findings could aid doctors investigating unexplained strokes or heart failure, enabling appropriate treatment. Researchers have trained an artificial intelligence model to detect the signature of atrial fibrillation in 10-second electrocardiograms (ECG) taken from patients in normal rhythm. The study, involving almost 181,000 patients and published in The Lancet, is the first to use deep learning to identify patients with potentially undetected atrial fibrillation and had an overall accuracy of 83%. Atrial fibrillation is estimated to affect 2.7–6.1 million people in the United States and is associated with increased risk of stroke, heart failure and mortality. It is difficult to detect on a single ECG because patients' hearts can go in and out of this abnormal rhythm, so atrial fibrillation often goes undiagnosed.


America Can Stop China from Dominating Artificial Intelligence--And Should

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China, writes Amy Webb in Inc., has been "building a global artificial intelligence empire, and seeding the tech ecosystem of the future." It has been particularly successful, Webb, the founder of the Future Today Institute, believes. "China is poised to become its undisputed global leader, and that will affect every business," she notes. Not everyone shares Webb's assessment that Chinese researchers are in the lead. America, after all, is home to most leading AI tech.


Middle East businesses welcome Amazon Web Services region launch

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Amazon Web Services (AWS) has connected the Middle East to its global network with the launch of its Bahrain AWS region. The cloud supplier already has infrastructure in the region, but the launch of the Bahrain AWS region, with three datacentres, will connect to its global network. This will bring the Middle East region up to par with its other global AWS regions as the Middle East accelerates its digital transformation. Andy Jassy, CEO at AWS, said the cloud could unlock digital transformation in the Middle East. "Today, we are launching advanced and secure technology infrastructure that matches the scale of our other AWS regions around the world and are already seeing strong demand in the Middle East for AWS technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, data analytics, IoT [internet of things] and much more," he said.


Yemeni Houthis claim drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – Yemen's Houthi movement launched drone attacks on oil facilities in a remote area of Saudi Arabia, the group's Al Masirah TV said Saturday, but there was no immediate confirmation from Saudi authorities or state oil giant Aramco. A Saudi-led coalition is battling the Iran-aligned Houthis to try to restore Yemen's government, which was ousted from power in the capital, Sanaa, by the group in late 2014. The war has been in military stalemate for years. The Houthis have stepped up cross-border missile and drone attacks on Saudi Arabia in recent months. "Ten drones targeted Aramco's Shaybah oilfield and refinery in the first Operation: Balance of Deterrence in the east of the kingdom," the Al Masirah channel reported, citing a Houthi military spokesman.


A.I. Is Learning From Humans. Many Humans.

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What I saw didn't look very much like the future -- or at least the automated one you might imagine. The offices could have been call centers or payment processing centers. One was a timeworn former apartment building in the middle of a low-income residential neighborhood in western Kolkata that teemed with pedestrians, auto rickshaws and street vendors. In facilities like the one I visited in Bhubaneswar and in other cities in India, China, Nepal, the Philippines, East Africa and the United States, tens of thousands of office workers are punching a clock while they teach the machines. Tens of thousands more workers, independent contractors usually working in their homes, also annotate data through crowdsourcing services like Amazon Mechanical Turk, which lets anyone distribute digital tasks to independent workers in the United States and other countries.


Japanese team developing AI-based system to forecast chance of tsunami and scale of damage

The Japan Times

Drawing lessons from one of the worst disasters in the nation's history, a team of Japanese researchers is developing an artificial intelligence-based tsunami-forecasting system set for release in fiscal 2020 that could help limit loss of life and property in future calamities. In March 2011, massive tsunami 30 meters high triggered by a 9.1 magnitude earthquake destroyed a large swath of the Tohoku coastline, taking not only residents but also entire communities and businesses by surprise. The researchers hope the new system will help municipalities and companies nationwide better prepare for any future calamities and prevent related disasters, such as the triple core meltdown at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant that resulted from the tsunami. The team, made up of researchers from risk management consultancy Tokio Marine & Nichido Risk Consulting Co. and the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience are working on the nation's first system for predicting the likelihood of tsunami based on location, as well as the scope of damage in areas expected to be hit. "The existing forecasting system only estimates the maximum height of a tsunami but not its likelihood … and sometimes there are no available measures to prepare for the worst-case scenario," a spokesman for Tokio Marine & Nichido Risk Consulting said by phone.


Japan offers U.S. its robotics tech for use in denuclearizing North Korea

The Japan Times

Japan has told the United States it is ready to provide its robot technology for use in dismantling nuclear and uranium enrichment facilities in North Korea as Washington and Pyongyang pursue further denuclearization talks, government sources said Friday. As Japan turns to the remotely controlled robots it has developed to decommission reactors crippled by the triple core meltdown in 2011 at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant, it believes the same technology can be used in North Korea, according to the sources. The offer is part of Japan's efforts to make its own contribution to the denuclearization talks amid concern that Tokyo could be left out of the loop as the United States and North Korea step up diplomacy. Tokyo has already told Washington it would shoulder part of the costs of any International Atomic Energy Agency inspections of North Korean facilities and dispatch its own nuclear experts to help. The scrapping of nuclear facilities, such as the Yongbyon complex, which has a graphite-moderated reactor, will come into focus in forthcoming working-level talks between Washington and Pyongyang.