China


The Amazing Ways Chinese Face Recognition Company Megvii (Face ) Uses AI And Machine Vision

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Megvii Technology, a Chinese company, founded in 2011 and widely known for its Face system, is one of the world leaders in facial recognition and artificial intelligence technology. While they might be best known for Face, Megvii uses artificial intelligence and machine vision in a variety of amazing ways. Megvii was the concept conceived by friends and Tsinghua University graduates Yin Qui, Yang Mu, and Tang Wenbin. After tremendous success in China (especially since they were able to train algorithms from China's vast pool of data) with clients such as Ant Financial, Vivo (smartphones), Didi Chuxing (ride-sharing) and investments from Bank of China, the State-Owned Venture Capital Fund, China-Russian Investment Fund and other private investors including Ant Financial (Alibaba's payment affiliate), Megvii is ready to go global. They have projects slated in the coming year for Japan, Europe, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and the United States and have secured a distributor in Thailand.


Robots conduct daily health inspections of schoolchildren in China

New Scientist

Please stand in front of Walklake for your examination. This health checking robot takes just 3 seconds to diagnose a variety of ailments in children, including conjunctivitis, and hand, foot and mouth disease. Over 2000 preschools in China, with children aged between 2 and 6, are using Walklake every morning to check the health status of their students. Walklake has a boxy body and smiling cartoony face.


U.S. weighs blacklisting five Chinese video surveillance firms over treatment of Uighurs

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - The U.S. is considering cutting off the flow of vital American technology to five Chinese companies including Megvii, widening a dragnet beyond Huawei to include world leaders in video surveillance as it seeks to challenge China's treatment of minority Uighurs in the country's northwest. The U.S. is deliberating whether to add Megvii, Zhejiang Dahua Technology Co., Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co. and two others to a blacklist that bars them from U.S. components or software, people familiar with the matter said. The two others under consideration are Meiya Pico and Iflytek Co. Ltd., according to one of the people. The Trump administration is concerned about their role in helping Beijing repress minority Uighurs, they said, asking not to be identified talking about private deliberations. There's concern also that Hikvision or Dahua's cameras, which come with facial-recognition capabilities, could be employed in espionage, the people said.


China is using facial recognition to track and monitor giant PANDAS for conservation database

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Surveillance isn't the only application of China's advanced facial recognition software. Conservationists are now using the technology too, as a tool to help protect wild panda populations. According to a report from Xinhua News, researchers at the China Conservation and Research Center for Giant Pandas in Chengu have begun using facial recognition software to identify the often similar-looking faces and markings of wild pandas. Giant pandas are the latest subject of China's facial recognition software. Conservationists are now using the technology to monitor and track the animals.


Facing the Rigid Demand of Artificial Intelligence Customer Service, Chengdu Xiaoduo AI Technology Co., Ltd., Based in Chengdu Tianfu Software Park, Completes Series B Financing

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The funds raised in this round are to be used for recruiting more high-caliber talents and developing new technologies. Xiaoduo AI has been engaged in the AI customer service application scenario for many years, which is a highlighted project in Chengdu's AI industry. From the perspective of the current enterprise volume and technical background, it has the potential to become a hidden champion in the field of AI customer service. Founded in 2014, Xiaoduo AI adheres to the vision of "becoming the AI expert of enterprises and creating better communication and service with AI", and has been committed to improving the efficiency of the customer service industry by leveraging the AI technology. At present, Xiaoduo AI serves more than 20,000 governmental and enterprise clients, including Meituan, Zhuanzhuan, YouShop, EMS, Robam Electric Appliance, XGIMI, TmallGenie, 1919.cn,


US warns about alleged spying threat from Chinese-made drones

FOX News

The US government is warning businesses about the risks of using Chinese-made aerial drones on claims they may pose a spying threat. On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security issued an industry alert over the alleged spying dangers, according to CNN. The alert doesn't name a specific company, but one of the biggest drone manufacturers in the world is DJI, which is based in Shenzhen, China. The department is worried the drone technologies can collect information and secretly send it back to their manufacturers in China. If this occurs, the Chinese government has the power to compel the manufacturer to hand over all the acquired data.


Britain Has More Surveillance Cameras Per Person Than Any Country Except China. That's a Massive Risk to Our Free Society

TIME - Tech

How would you feel being watched, tracked and identified by facial recognition cameras everywhere you go? Facial recognition cameras are now creeping onto the streets of Britain and the U.S., yet most people aren't even aware. As we walk around, our faces could be scanned and subjected to a digital police line up we don't even know about. There are over 6 million surveillance cameras in the U.K. – more per citizen than any other country in the world, except China. In the U.K., biometric photos are taken and stored of people whose faces match with criminals – even if the match is incorrect. As director of the U.K. civil liberties group Big Brother Watch, I have been investigating the U.K. police's "trials" of live facial recognition surveillance for several years.


Learning to Love the AI Bubble

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Not all bubbles have negative consequences for the economy. An AI bubble is more likely to generate value than wreak havoc. With investments in artificial intelligence rising rapidly, especially in China and the United States, two questions arise: Are we heading toward an AI bubble? And if so, how bad would it be if the bubble were to burst? Having studied AI intensely for the past two years, our best guess to the first question is, yes, today's fascination with all things AI has most of the trappings of a financial bubble.


AI investment by country – survey

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With leaders increasingly seeing artificial intelligence (AI) as helping to drive the next great economic expansion, a fear of missing out is spreading around the globe. Numerous nations have developed AI strategies to advance their capabilities, through investment, incentives, talent development, and risk management. As AI's importance to the next generation of technology grows, many leaders are worried that they will be left behind and not share in the gains. There is a growing realization of AI's importance, including its ability to provide competitive advantage and change work for the better. A majority of global early adopters say that AI technologies are especially important to their business success today--a belief that is increasing. A majority also say they are using AI technologies to move ahead of their competition, and that AI empowers their workforce. AI success depends on getting the execution right. Organizations often must excel at a wide range of practices to ensure AI success, including developing a strategy, pursuing the right use cases, building a data foundation, and cultivating a strong ability to experiment. These capabilities are critical now because, as AI becomes even easier to consume, the window for competitive differentiation will likely shrink. Early adopters from different countries display varying levels of AI maturity. Enthusiasm and experience vary among early adopters from different countries. Some are pursuing AI vigorously, while others are taking a more cautious approach.


US government looking to develop AI that can track people across surveillance network

Daily Mail - Science & tech

An advanced research arm of the U.S. government's intelligence community is looking to develop AI capable of tracking people across a vast surveillance network. As reported by Nextgov, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) has put out a call for more information on developing an algorithm that can be trained to identify targets by visually analyzing swaths of security camera footage. The goal, says the request, is to be able to identify and track subjects across areas as large as six miles in an effort to reconstruct crime scenes, protect military operations, and monitor critical infrastructure facilities. To develop the technology, IARPA will collect nearly 1,000 hours of video surveillance from at least 20 camera networks and then, using that sample, test various algorithms effectiveness. The agency's interest in AI-based surveillance technology mirrors a broader movement from governments and intelligence communities around the globe, many of whom have ramped up efforts to develop and scale systems.