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Your Amazon Echo didn't build itself. This researcher is tracking AI's social and environmental consequences

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"AI is being fed directly into the bloodstream of society, and in many cases without sufficient checks and balances," says Kate Crawford, a professor and cofounder of New York University's AI Now, the world's first academic research institute dedicated to the social impact of artificial intelligence. Last year, Crawford partnered with data-viz guru Vladan Joler to create "Anatomy of an AI System," a map and research paper demonstrating the real-world consequences of developing and manufacturing the Amazon Echo. The paper highlights the radical differences in income distribution between Amazon executives and the workers who enable its vast infrastructure, as well as its devastating environmental impacts. The project has been exhibited at museums around the world, and Crawford has presented it to leaders in France, Germany, Spain, and Argentina.


PYMNTS.com

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This week Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos got the tech sector's attention with emerging reports of his "fascination" with the rapidly developing world of autonomous autos. "If you think about the auto industry right now, there's so many things going on with Uber-ization, electrification, the connected car -- so it's a fascinating industry," Bezos said. "It's going to be something very interesting to watch and participate in, and I'm very excited about that whole industry." Amazon has made some sizable investments to accompany that interest -- most notably in automation and electrification start-up Rivian and self-driving startup Aurora. And fascination aside, Amazon has a race for the consumer's whole paycheck to vie in with Walmart -- and there is little doubt that auto automation plays like Rivian and Aurora could put some octane, so to speak, behind that effort.


Samsung AI Can Turn a Single Portrait Into a Realistic Talking Head

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There have been huge advancements in recent years in the area of AI "deepfakes", or fake photos or videos of humans created using neural networks. Fake videos of a person usually require a large number of photos of that individual, but Samsung has figured out how to create realistic talking heads from as little as a single portrait photo. In a newly published paper titled, "Few-Shot Adversarial Learning of Realistic Neural Talking Head Models," a team of researchers at the Samsung AI Center in Moscow, Russia, share their new system that has this "few-shot capability." Once it's familiar with human faces, it's able to create talking heads of previously unseen people using one or a few shots of that person. For each photo, the AI is able to detect various "landmarks" on the face -- things like the eyes, nose, mouth, and various lengths and shapes.


Chinese pre-schools use robots to do daily health checks of children

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The school nurse of the future could be a robot if Chinese technology catches on – but British people may be too suspicious, experts say. Children at more than 2,000 pre-schools in the Asian country now have their health checked every morning by a machine. The Walklake robot, which has a square body and cartoon-like face, takes just three seconds to scan a child's hands, eyes, and throats. And if it picks up any signs of illness – red eyes, rashes or mouth ulcers, for example – it can refer the child to a human nurse. One British doctor said he thought parents in the UK wouldn't want the technology and it could disrupt children's learning, but another called it'a great idea'.


Chinese pre-schools use robots to do daily health checks of children

#artificialintelligence

The school nurse of the future could be a robot if Chinese technology catches on – but British people may be too suspicious, experts say. Children at more than 2,000 pre-schools in the Asian country now have their health checked every morning by a machine. The Walklake robot, which has a square body and cartoon-like face, takes just three seconds to scan a child's hands, eyes, and throats. And if it picks up any signs of illness – red eyes, rashes or mouth ulcers, for example – it can refer the child to a human nurse. One British doctor said he thought parents in the UK wouldn't want the technology and it could disrupt children's learning, but another called it'a great idea'.


A Lack Of Artificial Intelligence Managers Threatens Italy

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The problem is not only in the lack of educational institutions for bringing up this kind of specialists. There is also the absence of a general concept to solve the problem of training qualified personnel. Sceptics believe that the creation of added value in the era of artificial intelligence depends on the genius of the individual -- a creative expert who cannot be taught to manage the processes of artificial intelligence. Internet gurus such as Mark Zuckerberg or Pavel Durov are often cited as examples. However, people forget that the above-mentioned creators are only the developers of the concept, which is implemented by an horde of medium-level managers.


How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen

NYT > Middle East

Visual Investigations Latest Video 10:45 How U.S. Weapons Ended Up Hitting Hospitals in Yemen Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:57 How an Elite Nigerian Unit Killed Dozens of Protesters Visual Investigations Latest Video 6:52 A Black Driver, a Marijuana Bust and a Body Camera That Turned Off Visual Investigations Latest Video 8:32 Killing Khashoggi: How a Brutal Saudi Hit Job Unfolded Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers. Visual Investigations Latest Video 7:07 How a Gang Hunted and Killed a 15-Year-Old in the Bronx Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:48 How a C.I.A. Drone Base Grew in the Desert Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:49 How Surveillance Cameras Tracked Two Russian Hit Men Visual Investigations Latest Video 3:04 How the Drone Attack on Maduro Unfolded in Venezuela Visual Investigations Latest Video 5:44 The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. The U.S. Blamed Maduro for Burning Aid to Venezuela. Visual Investigations Latest Video 1:31 The Bomb Suspect's Van Is Covered With Stickers.


Artificial Intelligence In Finance Market Valuable Insights by Major Players Accenture, Dataminr, Cape Analytics, Numerai, ZestFinance, Active.ai, AIndra Systems – Market Research Report

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The global analysis of Artificial Intelligence In Finance Market and its upcoming prospects have recently added by Research N Reports to its extensive repository. It has been employed through the primary and secondary research methodologies. This market is expected to become competitive in the upcoming years due to the new entry of a number of startups in the market. Additionally, it offers effective approaches for building business plans strategically which helps to promote control over the businesses. "Artificial Intelligence is the intelligence which is shown by machines. Cognitive computing, Chatbots, Personal Assistant, Machine Learning are all peripherals of AI used in the finance industry extensively nowadays."


Machine learning could help make antibiotics more effective

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Jason Yang, an IMES research scientist, is the lead author of the paper, which appears in the May 9 issue of Cell. Other authors include Sarah Wright, a recent MIT MEng recipient; Meagan Hamblin, a former Broad Institute research technician; Miguel Alcantar, an MIT graduate student; Allison Lopatkin, an IMES postdoc; Douglas McCloskey and Lars Schrubbers of the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability; Sangeeta Satish and Amir Nili, both recent graduates of Boston University; Bernhard Palsson, a professor of bioengineering at the University of California at San Diego; and Graham Walker, an MIT professor of biology.


UK ranked second in global government AI league table

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The UK has been knocked from the top spot of a global ranking of countries whose governments are ready to capitalise on artificial intelligence technologies in public services. The UK was narrowly beaten to the number one position by Singapore in this year's Government AI Readiness Index, which the ranking's authors described as a "timely reminder of the ongoing inequality of access to AI". This is the second time the ranking has been produced, with the UK having topped the leaderboard in the first iteration in 2017. Technology consultancy Oxford Insights and the Canadian government-sponsored International Development Research Centre said the 2019 Government AI Readiness Index should prompt governments to "act to ensure that global inequalities are not further entrenched or exacerbated by AI". Unsurprisingly, the upper echelons of the ranking were dominated by higher-income countries with strong economies.