neuralink


Elon Musk said his AI-brain-chips company could 'solve' autism and schizophrenia

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Elon Musk said he thinks his neural-technology company, Neuralink, will be able to "solve" schizophrenia and autism. On the latest "Artificial Intelligence" podcast with Lex Fridman, published Tuesday, the Tesla and SpaceX CEO was asked about the most exciting effects he foresees for Neuralink, whose goal is to develop an AI-enabled chip that could be implanted in a person's brain to record brain activity and potentially stimulate it. "So Neuralink I think at first will solve a lot of brain-related diseases," Musk said. "So could be anything from, like, autism, schizophrenia, memory loss -- like, everyone experiences memory loss at certain points in age. Parents can't remember their kids' names and that kind of thing."


Should Tesla Carry the Burden of Teaching the Public About Artificial Intelligence?

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In a recent podcast discussion Elon Musk had with AI expert Lex Fridman about artificial intelligence, consciousness, and Musk's brain-computer interface company Neuralink, an interesting question arose about Tesla's role as an educator in that realm. Referring specifically to the Smart Summon feature that's part of the company's Version ten firmware, Fridman asked Musk whether he felt the burden of being an AI communicator by exposing people for the first time (on a large scale) to driverless cars. To be honest, Musk's response wasn't really, well, responsive. He deferred to the more commercial-oriented goals of the company: "We're just trying to make people's lives easier with autonomy." The long-term goals of Neuralink are pretty scary for mainstream humans, so to me, this question really deserves a long sit-and-think.


Should Tesla carry the burden of teaching the public about artificial intelligence?

#artificialintelligence

Welcome to a FREE preview of our weekly exclusive! Each week our team goes'Beyond the News' and handcrafts a special edition that includes our thoughts on the biggest stories, why it matters, and how it could impact the future. You can receive this newsletter along with all of our other members-exclusive newsletters, become a premium member for just $3/month. Your support goes a long way for us behind the scenes! In a recent podcast discussion Elon Musk had with AI expert Lex Fridman about artificial intelligence, consciousness, and Musk's brain-computer interface company Neuralink, an interesting question arose about Tesla's role as an educator in that realm.


How AI is Changing the Way We Treat Diseases and Disabilities

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The age of artificial intelligence is allowing us to rethink the way that we treat diseases and disabilities. The combination of AI and Big Data, in addition to helping with medical diagnosis, coupled with biological delivery systems, such as gene therapy delivery system can significantly alter the way we treat a host of diseases that are, according to modern science, incurable: cancer, autism, some mental illnesses, and rare genetic illnesses. Specifically, combining AI, big data, robotics, gene therapy, and medical research has unleashed a host of possibilities to cure these types of diseases. At the same time, the combined innovation efforts are helping people with disabilities live their lives better. Here's an overview of some of these advances as we move into the new year.


Elon Musk says Neuralink could bring A.I. 'superintelligence' to the brain

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Beyond cortical and limbic systems, the company Neuralink could add a third layer of digital superintelligence to humans and avoid artificial intelligence enslavement, its founder Elon Musk claimed Tuesday. The brain-computer linkup firm is working to treat medical conditions using its implanted chip as early as next year, but during a podcast appearance, Musk reiterated his belief that the technology could avoid some of the worst consequences of advanced machines. "It's important that Neuralink solves this problem sooner rather than later, because the point at which we have digital superintelligence, that's when we pass the singularity and things become just very uncertain," Musk said during an interview with MIT professor Lex Fridman. Musk was keen to note that the singularity, a hypothesized point where machines grow so advanced that humanity slips into an irreversible change, may not necessarily be good or bad. He did state, however, that "things become extremely unstable" after that point, which means Neuralink would need to achieve its human-brain linkup either before or not long after "to minimize the existential risk for humanity and consciousness as we know it."


Elon Musk Said His AI Brain Chips Company Could 'Solve' Autism and Schizophrenia

#artificialintelligence

Elon Musk believes his neural technology company Neuralink will be able to "solve" schizophrenia and autism. Speaking on the Artificial Intelligence podcast with Lex Fridman, published Tuesday, Musk was asked what he thinks are the most exciting impacts he foresees for his company Neuralink. Neuralink's goal is to develop an AI-enabled chip that could be implanted in a person's brain, where it would be able to both record brain activity and potentially stimulate it. "So Neuralink, I think at first will solve a lot of brain-related diseases. So could be anything from like autism, schizophrenia, memory loss -- like everyone experiences memory loss at certain points in age. Parents can't remember their kids' names and that kind of thing," replied Musk.


Elon Musk Says Putting AI Chip in Your Brain Will Be as Simple as Lasik

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Elon Musk's Neuralink has been on a hiring spree since summer. Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk doesn't often publicly talk about his low-profile side hustle at biotech startup Neuralink. But when he does, the news is usually far more exiting than any of his updates on electric cars or rockets. In July, Neuralink published a white paper about an implantable brain chip it had been working on, which Musk said would help "merge biological intelligence with machine intelligence." This week, speaking on the Artificial Intelligence podcast hosted by MIT research scientist Lex Fridman, Musk shared a more detailed explanation of how things are unfolding at Neuralink and his ultimate vision for the sci-fi-sounding device that's in the making.


Elon Musk said his AI brain chips company could 'solve' autism and schizophrenia – Invest Records

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Elon Musk believes his neural technology company Neuralink will be able to "solve" schizophrenia and autism. Speaking on the Artificial Intelligence podcast with Lex Fridman, published Tuesday, Musk was asked what he thinks are the most exciting impacts he foresees for his company Neuralink. Neuralink's goal is to develop an AI-enabled chip that could be implanted in a person's brain, where it would be able to both record brain activity and potentially stimulate it. "So Neuralink, I think at first will solve a lot of brain-related diseases. So could be anything from like autism, schizophrenia, memory loss -- like everyone experiences memory loss at certain points in age. Parents can't remember their kids' names and that kind of thing," replied Musk.


Elon Musk: Neuralink, AI, Autopilot, and the Pale Blue Dot Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast

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Elon Musk is the CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, Neuralink, and a co-founder of several other companies. This is the second time Elon has been on the podcast. This conversation focuses on the incredible engineering and innovation done at Neuralink. This work promises to help treat neurobiological diseases, to help us further understand the connection between the individual neuron to the high-level function of the human brain, and finally to one day expand the capacity of the brain through two-way communication with computational devices, the Internet, and artificial intelligence systems. This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast.


The Implant That Can Control Your Brain - Issue 77: Underworlds 

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Shaun Patel has such a tranquil voice that it's easy to see how he convinces patients to let him experiment in the depth of their brains. On the phone, in his office at Massachusetts General Hospital (he is also on faculty at Harvard Medical School), the neuroscientist spoke about gray matter almost as if he were guiding me in meditation. Or perhaps that was just the heady effect of him detailing a paper he had just published in Brain, showing how, using implants on his patients, he could enhance learning by stimulating the caudate nucleus, which lies near the center of the brain.1 You have to time the electric pulse just right, he told me, based on the activity of certain neurons firing during an active learning phase of a game. A perfectly timed pulse could speed up how quickly his patients made the right associations. Using similar methods, he said he has induced people to make more financially conservative bets.