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Daily Newsletter from Erling.A. Sjokvist

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can truly relieve some of the hiring and evaluation burdens of Human Resources (HR). But, there are several areas where it's just not ready to take the place of actual humans…


Daily Newsletter from Erling.A. Sjokvist

#artificialintelligence

Daily Newsletter from Erling.A. Sjokvist - Wednesday, June 30 Your Daily Newsletter that Featuring!


Top 10 Data Science Newsletters To Stay Updated Amid Lockdown

#artificialintelligence

With data science and artificial intelligence evolving on a daily basis, the magnitude of information it generates can sometimes be challenging to keep pace with. And that's why all these data science news websites and blogs come with their newsletter that continually churns out relevant and significant information for readers. An excellent form of curated content, newsletters can be extremely informative and insightful for data science professionals, students as well as business leaders. These weekly newsletters provide updated trends of the industry, latest news, different methodologies as well as information on new technologies that can be an exciting learning resource for many. Further, with such a vast amount of information, it is critical for all to stay away from clickbait as well as fake news, and these newsletters can be the perfect rescue for the same.


Amazon will do whatever it can to pull you into Alexa's ecosystem

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I've been thinking about how Amazon takes a chaos-energy attitude towards developing ecosystems around its products. When it's trying to get third parties to work with its products, Amazon throws open the doors and invites all comers. When it's making new products itself, Amazon is much more likely than anybody else to just do whatever it wants, sometimes aggressively. Sometimes that leads to hilarious Alexa products like rings that listen to your whisper when you push a button on it, IR blasters, and Alexa party games. Other times it leads to corporate synergy with a burgeoning police interest in surveillance.


We're still not getting voice assistants right

#artificialintelligence

The BBC is launching its own voice assistant, appropriately called'Beeb' (though the efficacy of that wake word is completely suspect in a world where people might talk about Justin Bieber, just saying). Upon hearing this news, you might be tempted to think, "Ugh, why? The Beeb assistant might be a boondoggle, a waste of British taxpayer money, and a classic example of the BBC making a tech thing without a super clear reason or need just because it can. In fact, I would put even money on it being all three of those things, but I'm still rooting for it anyway. Command Line is our daily newsletter about personal tech.


Work It

The New Yorker

Suzanne, a young woman in San Francisco, met a man--call him John--on the dating site OKCupid. John was attractive and charming. More notably, he indulged in the kind of profligate displays of affection which signal a definite eagerness to commit. He sneaked Suzanne's favorite snacks into her purse as a workday surprise and insisted early on that she keep a key to his apartment. He asked her to help him choose a couch and then spooned with her on all the floor models. He even accompanied her, unprompted, to the D.M.V.--an act roughly equivalent, in today's gallantry currency, to Perseus rescuing Andromeda from the sea monster. As we learn from the podcast "Reply All," which reported the tale, Suzanne was not the only woman on whom John had chosen to bestow his favor. Six months into their relationship, she discovered that he was seeing half a dozen other women, one of whom he'd been stringing along for two years. All of them had received the couch-spooning treatment.


Fortunate

The New Yorker

Gem Spa, the narrow twenty-four-hour newsstand on St. Mark's Place, has served as a nerve center for generations of beats, hippies (undeterred by a sign reading, "No Combing of Hair--By Order of Health Dept"), rockers, and punks. The other day, Lily Tomlin, who is seventy-six, stopped by in the hope of getting an egg cream. Encountering a long line of customers waiting to buy magazines and lottery tickets, her personal assistant, Paul (burly, doting), shuffled her out. "I used to live up the street--this is back in the sixties--on Fifth between Second and Third," Tomlin said. She wore a navy overcoat, a silk scarf, and sunglasses.


Bad Character

The New Yorker

I never learned anything in the Saturday-morning Chinese school I was forced to attend as a child, but that's not what motivates my choice here. There were plenty of reasons for my poor performance in those classes--my resentment at having to miss the "Super Friends" cartoon being just one of them--so I don't blame Chinese characters for my failure. No, my objection is a practical one: I'm a fan of literacy, and Chinese characters have been an obstacle to literacy for millennia. With a phonetic writing system like an alphabet or a syllabary, you need only learn a few dozen symbols and you can read most everything printed in a newspaper. With Chinese characters, you have to learn three thousand.


Show Them the Money

The New Yorker

"This Is Your Brain on Sports" (Crown Archetype), by L. Jon Wertheim and Sam Sommers, is a reader-friendly look at what the authors refer to as "all the batshit craziness that courses through the sports ecosystem"--a phrase that captures nicely the jocular and good-natured spirit of their undertaking. Some twenty sports-related topics are taken up, from why people believe that quarterbacks are good-looking (they're not, apparently, or not especially) to why international sporting events like the Olympics and the World Cup don't make Earth a more peaceful planet. Wertheim and Sommers's basic conceit is that although people seem to behave irrationally when it comes to sports, they're acting no differently from the way they do in the rest of their lives. If cheering on the underdog, loving perennial losers, and risking life and limb to snag a cheesy T-shirt fired out of a cannon are, objectively, absurd things to do, then it's natural to be irrational. "Your brain on sports," they conclude, "is really just your regular brain acting as it does in other contexts." "As outlandish as sports conduct might seem," they explain, "it is rooted in basic human psychology, neuroscience, and cognitive tendency." Their procedure is therefore to find for the various sports-related attitudes and behaviors they discuss (Wertheim is an editor at Sports Illustrated) scientific findings (Sommers is a psychologist at Tufts) that ground them in biology. The result is a large number of "as studies show" constructions.


The 2016 Presidential Election: A Cinematic Retrospective

The New Yorker

A workaholic moderate, who set aside dreams of a storybook inauguration to pursue a diplomatic career, meets a hopelessly single-issue candidate chasing his last shot at relevance. Throw in a wacky, albeit divided, party and an amorous ex-President who dredges up all kinds of unpleasant memories, and you have the sleeper hit of the season! Thematically, this film is underscored by decades of entrenched sexism and anti-socialism, though the talking points are the same as the 2008 original. "The Best (No, Seriously) the Greatest-Ever Exotic Marigold Hotel--I Mean It, It's Classy" A group of disenfranchised retirees book a stay at a destination resort built by a famed real-estate developer. But they soon discover that he didn't actually build it himself but licensed his name to the project.