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Global Robotic Sensors Market 2020- Technologies, Global Markets and Key Players Including Advanced Microsensors Inc., Bosch Sensortec GmbH, Cyberoptics Corp. and Electro-Sensors Inc – IAM Network

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The "Sensors for Robotics: Technologies and Global Markets" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering This report sizes the market by technology, including sensors within the vision, touch, hearing, and movement segments. The top seven application areas are sized, forecast, and discussed in-depth. These include agriculture, appliances, automotive, healthcare, industrial, logistics, and military. In addition, the overall market and each application area are assessed on a worldwide and regional basis, including North America, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, and Asia-Pacific. This report considers the economic slowdown caused by lockdown across the world owing to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Walmart Employees Are Out to Show Its Anti-Shoplifting AI Doesn't Work

WIRED

In January, my coworker received a peculiar email. The message, which she forwarded to me, was from a handful of corporate Walmart employees calling themselves the "Concerned Home Office Associates." While it's not unusual for journalists to receive anonymous tips, they don't usually come with their own slickly produced videos. The employees said they were "past their breaking point," with Everseen, a small artificial intelligence firm based in Cork, Ireland, whose technology Walmart began using in 2017. Walmart uses Everseen in thousands of stores to prevent shoplifting at registers and self-checkout kiosks.


Europe must act fast if it wants to compete in the AI 'arms race' - teiss

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In 2017, China laid out a three-step roadmap to become the world leader in AI by 2030. It hopes to make the industry worth 1 trillion yuan, or $147.7 billion, within the next decade. Already, it has announced billions in funding for innovative startups and launched programmes to entice researchers. It might not be long before it gains an edge over the US. That said, the US continues to pave the way, as is the case with many new fields of technology.


Microsoft responsible machine learning capabilities build trust in AI systems, developers say - The AI Blog

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Anyone who runs a business knows that one of the hardest things to do is accuse a customer of malfeasance. That's why, before members of Scandinavian Airlines' (SAS) fraud detection unit accuse a customer of attempting to scam the carrier's loyalty points program, the detectives need confidence that their case is solid. "It would hurt us even more if we accidentally managed to say that something is fraud, but it isn't," said Daniel Engberg, head of data analytics and artificial intelligence for SAS, which is headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden. The airline is currently flying a reduced schedule with limited in-flight services to help slow the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. Before the restrictions, SAS handled more than 800 departures per day and 30 million passengers per year.


Google cautions EU on AI rule-making

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Google warned on Thursday that the EU's definition of artificial intelligence was too broad and that Brussels must refrain from over-regulating a crucial technology. The search and advertising giant made its argument in feedback to the European Commission, the EU's powerful regulator that has reached out to big tech as it draws up ways to set new rules for AI. The EU has not decided yet on how to regulate AI, but is putting most of its focus on what it calls "high risk" sectors, such as healthcare and transport. It's plans, to be spearheaded by EU commissioners Margrethe Vestager and Thierry Breton, are not expected until the end of the year. "A clear and widely understood definition of AI will be a critical foundational element for an effective AI regulatory framework," the company said in its 45-page submission.


A Fundamental Theorem for Epidemiology

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The work of an Italian mathematician in the 1930s may hold the key to epidemic modeling. That's because models that try to replicate reality in all its detail have proven hard to steer during this crisis, leading to poor predictions despite noble and urgent efforts to recalibrate them. On the other hand overly stylized compartmental models have run headlong into paradoxes such as Sweden's herd immunity. This approach is represented in the picture above. The important thing to note is that we are not attempting to find a model that is close to the truth, only close to the orbit. This will make a lot more sense after Section 1, I promise.


Between hope and hype

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But also: 'AI will deepen my research and bring it a step further than it is now.' There is a wide range of opinions. Nevertheless, four out of five Dutch scientists foresee that AI will have a considerable impact on society. Two thirds also believe that AI will have a radical impact on science. The figures come from a survey that the editorial board of Research commissioned among researchers in various disciplines at Dutch knowledge institutions.


The current state of Artificial Intelligence 7wData

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General AI (Artificial Intelligence) is coming closer thanks to combining neural networks, narrow AI and symbolic AI. Yves Mulkers, Data strategist and founder of 7wData talked to Wouter Denayer, Chief Technology Officer at IBM Belgium, to share his enlightening insights on where we are and where we are going with Artificial Intelligence. Join us in our chat with Wouter. Yves Mulkers Hi and welcome, today we're together with Wouter Denayer, Chief Technology Officer at IBM. Wouter, you're kind of authority in Belgium and I think outside the borders of Belgium as well on artificial intelligence. Can you tell me a bit more about what you're doing at IBM and What keeps you busy?


COVID-19 throat swab test robot developed by Danish researchers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A robot that is able to take throat swabs from coronavirus patients using a 3D printed arm was developed by a team of researchers from Denmark in just four weeks. The University of Southern Denmark says the world's first fully automated throat swab robot will be be able to test the first COVID-19 patients by late June. Using disposable 3D printed parts, the robot holds a swab and hits the exact spot in the throat where a sample needs to be collected every time. It puts the swab in a glass and screws the lid on to seal the sample without human input - reducing the risk of exposing healthcare workers to the deadly virus. A team of ten researchers for the Industry 4.0 Lab at the University of Southern Denmark worked around the clock to produce the prototype of the robot.


The End of Handshakes--for Humans and for Robots

WIRED

Elenoide the android was made to shake your hand. She looks like a Madame Tussad's rendition of a prim fifth-grade teacher. She's dressed in a salmon cardigan with scalloped edges, a knee-length striped skirt, and a wig made of ashy blonde human hair. Her hands are warmed by heating pads hidden beneath the palms. During experiments, she wears white butler gloves.