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Better outcomes with AI: Frost & Sullivan names Microsoft the leading AI platform for healthcare IT

#artificialintelligence

In early 2020, Frost & Sullivan recognized Microsoft as the "undisputed leader" in global Artificial Intelligence (AI) platforms for the Healthcare IT (HCIT) sector on the Frost Radar . In a field of more than 200 global industry participants, Frost & Sullivan independently plotted the top 20 companies across various parameters indicative of growth and innovation, available for consumption here. According to Frost & Sullivan, the global AI HCIT market is on a rapid growth trajectory, with sales of AI-enabled HCIT products expected to generate more than $34.83 billion globally by 2025. Government agencies will contribute almost 50.7 percent of the revenue (including public payers), followed by hospital providers (36.3 percent) and physician practices (13 percent). Clinical AI solutions will drive 40 percent of the market revenue, with financial AI solutions contributing the same, and the remaining 20 percent coming from sales of operational AI solutions. Globally, Microsoft earned the top spot because of its industry-leading effort to incorporate next-generation AI infrastructure to drive precision medicine workflows, aid population health analytics, propel evidence-based clinical research, and expedite drug and treatment discovery.


Artificial Intelligence revamping exercise routines in the age of COVID-19

#artificialintelligence

Fitness routines have changed a lot during the pandemic. More people are opting to take their workout outside or choosing an indoor setting with minimal people. Owner of The Exercise Coach in Brookfield Kristine Staral says their business model relies on smart technology that allows individuals to get the optimum workout in the shortest amount of time. "Our focus is on muscle quality over movement quantity- so it's a safe, effective, and efficient workout and by that I mean our clients only need to commit to 2- 20 minute workouts a week. We do use smart technology along with certified coaches," said Staral.


Elderly people walk 1mph FASTER now than pensioners 30 years ago

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Elderly people living today are fitter and healthier than they were 30 years ago, according to a study by Finnish researchers. As a result of better nutrition, hygiene and healthcare people between 75 and 80 now walk, on average, almost 1mph faster than they did in 1990. The oldest members of society also have greater leg and grip strength in the modern era, as well as improved reaction speed, verbal fluency, reasoning and memory. Finnish researchers compared data on 500 people born between 1910 and 1914, who were tested between 1989 and 1990, with 726 people born in 1938 or 1939 and tested in 2017 and 2018. The same tests were administered to both groups and assessed physical state as well as cognitive function.


Fitbit Sense review: A half-baked smartwatch for the wellness warrior

Mashable

It's taken almost four years, but it feels like Fitbit has finally found its footing in the world of smartwatches and the Fitbit Sense is proof -- sort of. At this point, it's no secret that Fitbit is extremely capable of manufacturing accurate, easy-to-use, sleek, and affordable fitness trackers. But when it comes to smartwatches, it's safe to say the journey hasn't been as smooth. Between 2016 and 2017, Fitbit released two devices that straddled the line between smartwatch and fitness tracker: the Blaze and Ionic. While both packed every sensor necessary to track your daily fitness needs, each one was just as clunky and unattractive as the one before it. These just weren't wrist-worn accessories anyone really wanted to wear on a daily basis.


Artificial Intelligence Advances Food Safety

#artificialintelligence

Machine vision has long found a place in food safety, working 24/7 without fatigue. But as data access increases and processing power improves, machine vision is finding even more opportunities through the added capabilities of artificial intelligence (AI). To take one example, traditional machine vision tends to struggle to inspect for contamination in sun-dried tomatoes. But it's an application that's well suited to AI. "Similar to a human, AI is very good at dealing with a lot of variations in whatever's being looked at," says Quinn Killough, senior business development manager for Landing AI, a company that provides end-to-end AI platforms for manufacturing. "That type of application, because there's so much variability in what a tomato could look like or what kind of contamination could be on it, it was a pretty tough machine vision problem in general. A human can do it easily. And it turns out AI can do it fairly easily as well. Being able to deal with all that variation in what you're looking at, it makes it very well suited for AI."


Artificial Intelligence Advances Food Safety

#artificialintelligence

Landing AI is helping food producers overcome not only the limitations of their human workforce but of traditional machine vision as well, using machine …


AI-Powered Home Workout Startup, Tonal, Raises $110 Million

#artificialintelligence

Tonal, an AI home fitness startup, recently raised $110 million. This amount brings the company's total funding up to $200 million. The investors included L Catterton, Delta-v Capital, Amazon's Alexa Fund, and Mousse Partners, along with athletes Stephen Curry, Paul George, Michelle Wie, and Bobby Wagner. The company will probably use these funds to accelerate its marketing efforts, scale its supply chain and logistics, and roll out software upgrades and new workout content. COVID-19 and lockdown have closed all sorts of public workout facilities worldwide, and that's why more and more people are trying to bring their gym in their homes.


Better outcomes with AI: Frost & Sullivan names Microsoft the leading AI platform for healthcare IT

#artificialintelligence

In early 2020, Frost & Sullivan recognized Microsoft as the "undisputed leader" in global Artificial Intelligence (AI) platforms for the Healthcare IT (HCIT) sector on the Frost Radar . In a field of more than 200 global industry participants, Frost & Sullivan independently plotted the top 20 companies across various parameters indicative of growth and innovation, available for consumption here. According to Frost & Sullivan, the global AI HCIT market is on a rapid growth trajectory, with sales of AI-enabled HCIT products expected to generate more than $34.83 billion globally by 2025. Government agencies will contribute almost 50.7 percent of the revenue (including public payers), followed by hospital providers (36.3 percent) and physician practices (13 percent). Clinical AI solutions will drive 40 percent of the market revenue, with financial AI solutions contributing the same, and the remaining 20 percent coming from sales of operational AI solutions. Globally, Microsoft earned the top spot because of its industry-leading effort to incorporate next-generation AI infrastructure to drive precision medicine workflows, aid population health analytics, propel evidence-based clinical research, and expedite drug and treatment discovery.


Human biohacking: an exciting prospect, but only for the rich?

ZDNet

A multi-nation study finds that many of us consider biohacking exciting, but fears concerning hacking and privacy remain. Human augmentation can describe many things. Hearing aids, pacemakers, and prosthetics are already in use, but in the future, we could be using the term for implants that improve cognitive abilities; chips that connect us to our smart devices, or bionic eyes that can restore lost sight, and more. When it comes to future applications, countries worldwide are pushing ahead with the development of new technologies which could result in enhancements to the human body. For example, Japan has recently set $1 billion on the table for researchers willing to pursue everything from human augmentation to longevity, due to the need to tackle an aging workforce and shrinking population.


Silicon Valley Thinks Artificial Intelligence Can Upgrade Your Workouts

#artificialintelligence

When San Francisco went into COVID-19 lockdown on March 17, the last thing 32-year-old tech entrepreneur Niket Desai had to worry about was staying fit. His regular spot, Barry's, would be closed indefinitely, but Desai had installed the Tempo Studio, an all-in-one home fitness device designed to turn 30 square feet of your living room into an artificial- intelligence-powered micro gym. Tempo is a six-foot-tall weight cabinet (weights included!) While similar devices, like Tonal, offer digital resistance training at home, Tempo is the first one to deploy 3D movement analysis, combined with machine learning and AI to improve your form and curate your workouts. Its screen streams more than 200 live and on-demand classes, from a ten-minute high-intensity workout to an hour of mobility training, while its motion sensors and AI isolate up to 25 different joints at 30 frames per second.