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Scientists combat anti-Semitism with artificial intelligence – IAM Network

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BERLIN (AP) -- An international team of scientists have joined forces to combat the spread of anti-Semitism online with the help of artificial intelligence. The Alfred Landecker Foundation, which supports the team, said Monday that the project named Decoding Anti-Semitism includes discourse analysts, computational linguists and historians. They will develop a "highly complex, AI-driven approach to identifying online anti-Semitism." The team includes researchers from Berlin's Technical University, King's College in London and other scientific institutions in Europe and Israel. Computers will run through vast amounts of data and images that humans wouldn't be able to assess because of their sheer quantity.


Declaration of the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on Cooperation in Artificial Intelligence Research and Development

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Recommending priorities for future cooperation, particularly in R&D areas where each partner shares strong common interest (e.g., interdisciplinary research and intelligent systems) and brings complementary challenges, regulatory or cultural considerations, or expertise to the partnerships; Promoting research and development in AI, focusing on challenging technical issues, and protecting against efforts to adopt and apply these technologies in the service of authoritarianism and repression. We intend to establish a bilateral Government-to-Government dialogue on the areas identified in this vision and explore an AI R&D ecosystem that promotes the mutual wellbeing, prosperity, and security of present and future generations. Signed in London and Washington on 25 September 2020, in two originals, in the English language.


New AI Paradigm May Reduce a Heavy Carbon Footprint

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Artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning can have a considerable carbon footprint. Deep learning is inherently costly, as it requires massive computational and energy resources. Now researchers in the U.K. have discovered how to create an energy-efficient artificial neural network without sacrificing accuracy and published the findings in Nature Communications on August 26, 2020. The biological brain is the inspiration for neuromorphic computing--an interdisciplinary approach that draws upon neuroscience, physics, artificial intelligence, computer science, and electrical engineering to create artificial neural systems that mimic biological functions and systems. The human brain is a complex system of roughly 86 billion neurons, 200 billion neurons, and hundreds of trillions of synapses.


Declaration of the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on Cooperation in Artificial Intelligence Research and Development: A Shared Vision for Driving Technological Breakthroughs in Artificial Intelligence - United States Department of State

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The following declaration was released by the Governments of the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland during the September 25 inaugural meeting of the Special Relationship Economic Working Group. We intend to establish a bilateral government-to-government dialogue on the areas identified in this vision and explore an AI R&D ecosystem that promotes the mutual wellbeing, prosperity, and security of present and future generations. Signed in London and Washington on September 25, 2020, in two originals, in the English language.


U.S., UK sign agreement on artificial intelligence

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The Trump administration announced on Friday that the United States and the United Kingdom had signed a new agreement to cooperate on research and development of artificial intelligence.


Exclusive: U.S. and U.K. announce AI partnership

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The Trump administration is set to announce that the United States and the United Kingdom have signed a new agreement to cooperate on research and development of artificial intelligence, in news shared first with Axios. Why it matters: The U.S. and its allies fear China is going to surpass them in AI. The partnership shows the U.S. and U.K. think they have a better chance at beating China by linking up. Details: The partnership will include the two countries working together on research and development of AI, including on issues of explainability and fairness, an administration official told Axios. Flashback: In May 2020, the U.S. and other allies launched the Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence, for "like-minded nations together to encourage the development of AI in line with our shared values."


Trump Administration Announces US–UK Artificial Intelligence R&D Agreement

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Today, the Trump Administration announced that the United States and the United Kingdom signed a Declaration on Cooperation in Artificial Intelligence Research and Development. Through this historic R&D cooperation agreement, we will work together to drive technological breakthroughs, promote researcher collaboration, and advance the development of trustworthy AI. Today's announcement is an outcome of the U.S. – UK Special Relationship Economic Working Group, which was established following a meeting between President Donald J. Trump and Prime Minister Boris Johnson last year. "America and our allies must lead the world in shaping the development of cutting edge AI technologies and protecting against authoritarianism and repression. We are proud to join our special partner and ally, the United Kingdom, to advance AI innovation for the well-being of our citizens, in line with shared democratic values," said Michael Kratsios, U.S. Chief Technology Officer.


Global Big Data Conference

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Financial crime as a wider category of cybercrime continues to be one of the most potent of online threats, covering nefarious actives as diverse as fraud, money laundering and funding terrorism. Today, one of the startups that has been building data intelligence solutions to help combat that is announcing a fundraise to continue fueling its growth. Ripjar, a UK company founded by five data scientists who previously worked together in British intelligence at the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ, the UK's equivalent of the NSA), has raised $36.8 million (£28 million) in a Series B, money that it plans to use to continue expanding the scope of its AI platform -- which it calls Labyrinth -- and scaling the business. Labyrinth, as Ripjar describes it, works with both structured and unstructured data, using natural language processing and an API-based platform that lets organizations incorporate any data source they would like to analyse and monitor for activity. It automatically and in real time checks these against other data sources like sanctions lists, politically exposed persons (PEPs) lists and transaction alerts.


CMU's Roborace Team Prepares for First Competition

CMU School of Computer Science

An autonomous car programmed by a Carnegie Mellon University student team will race for the first time Sept. 24-25 when Roborace, an international competition for autonomous vehicles (AVs), begins its season on the island of Anglesey in Wales. In Roborace, each team prepares their own artificial intelligence algorithms to control their race car, but all of the teams use identically prepared AVs, compute platforms and venues. To prepare for this month's race, the CMU team spent the summer working on the fundamentals of driving and on building an optimal driving path. But this week was the first time they had the chance to run their computer code on a hardware simulator. "Our minimum goal is to be able to get the car to start driving crash-free for now," said Anirudh Koul, an alumnus of the Language Technologies Institute's Master of Computational Data Science (MCDS) program and the team's coach. But the CMU team, the first U.S. team in Roborace, is confident that it will soon be competitive with other teams that have previous experience in the racing series.


Ripjar, founded by GCHQ alums, raises $36.8M for AI that detects financial crime – TechCrunch

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Financial crime as a wider category of cybercrime continues to be one of the most potent of online threats, covering nefarious actives as diverse as fraud, money laundering and funding terrorism. Today, one of the startups that has been building data intelligence solutions to help combat that is announcing a fundraise to continue fueling its growth. Ripjar, a UK company founded by five data scientists who previously worked together in British intelligence at the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ, the UK's equivalent of the NSA), has raised $36.8 million (£28 million) in a Series B, money that it plans to use to continue expanding the scope of its AI platform -- which it calls Labyrinth -- and scaling the business. Labyrinth, as Ripjar describes it, works with both structured and unstructured data, using natural language processing and an API-based platform that lets organizations incorporate any data source they would like to analyse and monitor for activity. It automatically and in real time checks these against other data sources like sanctions lists, politically exposed persons (PEPs) lists and transaction alerts.