California


Machine learning-guided channelrhodopsin engineering enables minimally invasive optogenetics

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We thank Twist Bioscience for synthesizing and cloning ChR sequences, D. Wagenaar (California Institute of Technology) and the Caltech Neurotechnology Center for building the mouse treadmill, J. Brake (California Institute of Technology) for performing spectrometer measurements, J. Bedbrook for critical reading of the manuscript and the Gradinaru and Arnold laboratories for helpful discussions. This work was funded by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies grant no. W911NF-09-0001 from the US Army Research Office (F.H.A) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (V.G.): NIH BRAIN grant no. RF1MH117069, NIH Director's Pioneer Award grant no. DP1NS111369, NIH Director's New Innovator Award grant no.


Data Scientist, IS&S - IoT BigData Jobs

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Apple is searching for a highly-skilled data scientist/engineer to join the Data Science team within our Internet Software and Services division. This is a full-time position based are our headquarters in Cupertino, CA. Key Qualifications Working knowledge of SQL, Python, and R. Experience with Java, C/C, and Scala is also desirable. Experience with Spark is highly desirable. Strong communication skills, both written and oral, and an ability to convey complex results in a clear manner.


Artificial Intelligence: Salaries Heading Skyward - KDnuggets

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Artificial intelligence salaries benefit from the perfect recipe for a sweet paycheck: a hot field and high demand for scarce talent. It's the ever-reliable law of supply and demand, and right now, anything artificial intelligence-related is in very high demand. According to Indeed.com, the average IT salary -- the keyword is "artificial intelligence engineer" -- in the San Francisco area ranges from approximately $134,135 per year for "software engineer" to $169,930 per year for "machine learning engineer." However, it can go much higher if you have the credentials firms need. One tenured professor was offered triple his $180,000 salary to join Google, which he declined for a different teaching position.


Artificial intelligence and chemistry compute at Lanxess

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Artificial intelligence (AI) isn't magic, it's just really complicated math, said Greg Mulholland, CEO and founder of Citrine Informatics (Redwood City, CA), at a press roundtable hosted by Lanxess (Cologne, Germany) at K 2019. But Mulholland's hosts seemed quite bedazzled by his AI-enabled platform, nonetheless. Lanxess is the first company to adopt Citrine's technology at scale, and Dr. Markus Eckert, Senior Vice President, Head of Business Unit Urethane Systems at Lanxess was eager to explain what it means for customers. Citrine is a Silicon Valley startup that couldn't be more niche: It has developed a platform that leverages data and AI specifically to accelerate the development of materials and chemicals. Citrine has been recognized for technology innovation by the World Economic Forum as a Tech Pioneer, and collaborates with world-class academic institutions such as Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and the University of California, Berkeley.


The threat of AI-powered cyberattacks looms large

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With damage related to cybercrime projected to hit $6 trillion annually by 2021, enterprises are putting more emphasis than ever on securing their digital and organizational assets. While rudimentary machine learning has played a role in cyber threats for some years, today there's talk of the looming threat of malicious AI: AI-powered cyber-attacks capable of causing massive damage worldwide without the involvement of human operators. To better understand the threats and opportunities presented by AI in the cyber security space, we went to the AI Summit San Francisco to catch up with Justin Fier, director of cyber intelligence and analytics at Darktrace – the company putting AI to work on cyber defense. Justin's background is in the US intelligence community, and today works with Darktrace's global customers on threat analysis, defensive cyber operations, IoT security, and machine learning. What are the key takeaways from your AI Summit keynote?


Why hedge fund managers are happy to let the machines take over

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A month ago many computer-driven investors watched astonished as markets were wracked by a financial tempest, with once-hot stocks tumbling and previously shunned sectors enjoying a revival. But for Michael Kharitonov, the chief executive of San Francisco-based Voleon Group, the rapid rotation out of momentum stocks that wrongfooted many investors was "boring". The $6bn-in-assets hedge fund hardly noticed the brief but dramatic reversal. "We saw nothing," he says, with a chuckle. Voleon sees itself as at the vanguard of the next wave of quantitative investing, using machine learning to unearth patterns too faint for others to detect.


Who will speak at Data Day Texas 2020

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Take advantage of our discount rooms at the conference hotel. We are beginning to announce speakers for 2020. Want to join us as a speaker? Check out our proposals page. Jesse Anderson is a data engineer, creative engineer, and managing director of the Big Data Institute. He works with companies ranging from startups to Fortune 100 companies on Big Data. This includes training on cutting edge technologies like Apache Kafka, Apache Hadoop and Apache Spark. He has taught over 30,000 people the skills to become data engineers.



Racial Flaws in Facial Recognition Tools Show Up Again in ACLU Study

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Another study is saying facial recognition software is proving unreliable when dealing with people of color. The American Civil Liberties Union of California recently released their study of Amazon's Rekognition software marketed to law enforcement authorities.


Fantastic Futures 2019 Conference

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Stanford Libraries will host the 2nd International Conference on AI for Libraries, Archives, and Museums over three days, December 4, 5 & 6, 2019. The first'Fantastic Futures' conference, which took place in December 2018 at the National Library of Norway in Oslo, initiated a community-focused approach to addressing the challenges and possibilities for libraries, archives, and museums in the era of artificial intelligence. The Stanford conference will expand that charge, adding to the plenary gathering a full day of workshops and a half day'unconference' shaped by the interests of those assembled. Wednesday, December 4, will be a day of plenary sessions to introduce attendees to a range of topics in AI, from the concerns of algorithmic bias and data privacy to the exciting developments in transforming discovery and digital content curation (see the full program). The two keynote addresses reflect Stanford Library's position as an academic center in close proximity to Silicon Valley: Bryan Catanzaro, the Vice President of Applied Deep Learning at Nvidia, will speak to the important contribution he thinks libraries can make in AI.