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Global Artificial Intelligence Robots Market Business Planning Research and Resources, Supply and Revenue By 2025 - WeeklySpy

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The Artificial Intelligence Robots Market report is a complete overview of the market, covering various aspects product definition, segmentation based on various parameters, and the prevailing vendor landscape. Analysis and discussion of important industry trends, market size, market share estimates are mentioned in the report. Artificial Intelligence Robots Market report includes historic data, present market trends, environment, technological innovation, upcoming technologies and the technical progress in the related industry. The Global Artificial Intelligence Robots Market accounted for USD 3.0 billion in 2017 and is projected to grow at a CAGR of 30.1% forecast to 2025. Some of the major countries covered in this report are U.S., Canada, Germany, France, U.K., Netherlands, Switzerland, Turkey, Russia, China, India, South Korea, Japan, Australia, Singapore, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and Brazil among others.


"The Alpha Wolf in the Human AI Team" @ The Future Steel Forum 2019

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It was a pleasure and honor to participate at this year's Future Steel Forum 2019 in Budapest to speak about one of my favorite topics, the effective collaboration between human and artificial intelligence. Thanks to the organizer, the presentation is now available for free download. The detailed article "The Alpha Wolf in the Human AI Team" was published inside the accompanying magazine.


Computer scientists predict lightning and thunder with the help of artificial intelligence

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At the beginning of June, the German Weather Service counted 177,000 lightning bolts in the night sky within a few days. The natural spectacle had consequences: Several people were injured by gusts of wind, hail and rain. Together with Germany's National Meteorological Service, the Deutscher Wetterdienst, computer science professor Jens Dittrich and his doctoral student Christian Schön from Saarland University are now working on a system that is supposed to predict local thunderstorms more precisely than before. It is based on satellite images and artificial intelligence. In order to investigate this approach in more detail, the researchers will receive 270,000 euros from the Federal Ministry of Transport.


The FCA and the Bank of England find that two-thirds of UK banks and financial service firms use machine learning

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Machine learning technology is poised to be huge thing in financial services. In fact, two-thirds of UK-based firms are already using it. That is according to two of the UK's top financial regulators. The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and the Bank of England have taken a deep dive into how the financial services industry in the country is using machine learning. The research is based on a survey sent out to 300 firms, including banks, credit brokers, e-money institutions, financial market infrastructure firms, investment managers, insurers, non-bank lenders and principal trading firms.


This autonomous ship aims to steer itself across the Atlantic ocean ZDNet

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An autonomous boat under developments could be the first ship to cross the Atlantic that is able to navigate around ships and other hazards by itself. The Mayflower Autonomous Ship (MAS) is an autonomous vessel due to depart from Plymouth in England on the fourth centenary of the original Mayflower voyage, on 6 September 2020, with its destination Plymouth, USA. The project was put together by marine research and exploration company ProMare in an effort to expand the scope of marine research. The boat will carry three research pods equipped with scientific instruments to measure various phenomena such as ocean plastics, mammal behaviour or sea level changes. IBM has now joined the initiative, and it will supply technical support for all navigation operations.


Autonomous 'Mayflower' research ship will use IBM AI tech to cross the Atlantic in 2020 – TechCrunch

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A fully autonomous ship called the "Mayflower" will make its voyage across the Atlantic Ocean next September, to mark the 400-year anniversary of the trip of the first Mayflower, which was very much not autonomous. It's a stark way to drive home just how much technology has advanced in the last four centuries, but also a key demonstration of autonomous seafaring technology, put together by marine research and exploration organization Promare and powered by IBM technology. The autonomous Mayflower will be decked out with solar panels, as well as diesel and wind turbines to provide it with its propulsion power, as it attempts the 3,220-mile journey from Plymouth in England, to Plymouth in Massachusetts in the U.S. The trip, if successful, will be among the first for full-size seafaring vessels navigating the Atlantic on their own, which Promare is hoping will open the doors to other research-focused applications of autonomous seagoing ships. To support that use case, it'll have research pods on board while it makes its trip. Three to be specific, developed by academics and researchers at the University of Plymouth, who will aim to run experiments in areas including maritime cybersecurity, sea mammal monitoring and even addressing the challenges of ocean-borne microplastics.


DWP tests AI system to judge whether benefit claims are TRUE

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Benefits claimants could soon be using robots to claim cash as the Government speeds up the development of an AI system by working with a billionaire tech boss who declared recently: 'I want a bot for every person'. The Department for Work and Pensions has employed more than 1,000 new IT staff and created an £8million-a-year'intelligent automation garage' to develop up to 100 new robots to help support Britain's welfare system - used by 7million people each year. The UK government is working with New York-based UiPath, co-founded by billionaire Daniel Dines, whose £7billion company is viewed as a future Google of robotics and Artificial Intelligence. Mr Dines' software is already used by Walmart, Toyota and many banks and now will help the DWP develop systems to check benefits claims with tech giants IBM, Tata Consultancy and Capgemini also involved. Developers believe a'virtual workforce' could handle simpler welfare cases and payments faster and with fewer mistakes than today - while more complicated cases would still be dealt with by human staff.


The Worlds That AI Might Create

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How are experts looking at the same present and arriving at such different and contradictory futures? Here's a look at five scenarios, and the paths that getting there might take. As artificial intelligence becomes more powerful, a lot of current jobs are doomed to disappear. University of Oxford researchers in 2017 estimated that nearly half of all U.S. jobs were at risk from AI-powered automation. Other forecasts come up with different estimates, but by any measure, the number of lost jobs is potentially huge. Automation has already made manufacturing, mining, agriculture and many other industries much less labor-intensive. One study estimated that from 1993 to 2007, each industrial robot replaced 3.3 workers.


Inside the urgent battle to stop UK police using facial recognition

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The last day of January 2019 was sunny, yet bitterly cold in Romford, east London. Shoppers scurrying from retailer to retailer wrapped themselves in winter coats, scarves and hats. The temperature never rose above three degrees Celsius. For police officers positioned next to an inconspicuous blue van, just metres from Romford's Overground station, one man stood out among the thin winter crowds. The man, wearing a beige jacket and blue cap, had pulled his jacket over his face as he moved in the direction of the police officers.


Neuromorphic Promises Better AI

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When Apple CEO Tim Cook introduced the iPhone X, he claimed it would "set the path for technology for the next decade." While it is too early to tell, the neural engine used for face recognition was the first of its kind. Today deep neural networks are a reality, and neuromorphic appears to be the only practical path to make continuing progress in AI. Facing data bandwidth constraints and ever-rising computational requirements, sensing and computing must reinvent themselves by mimicking neurobiological architectures, claimed a recently published report by Yole Développement (Lyon, France). In an interview with EE Times, Pierre Cambou, Principal Analyst for Imaging at Yole, explained that neuromorphic sensing and computing could solve most of AI's current issues while opening new application perspectives in the next decades.