Europe


Artificial intelligence to predict protein structure

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Proteins are biological high-performance machines. They can be found in every cell and play an important role in human blood coagulation or as main constituents of hairs or muscles. The function of these molecular tools is obvious from their structure. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a new method to predict this protein structure with the help of artificial intelligence. This is very difficult to detect, the experiments needed for this purpose are expensive and complex.


Smart Farming, or the Future of Agriculture

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We are a Ukraine-based company which means that our parents and grandparents lived in the era of infamous Soviet collective farms, where tractors were considered to be an ultimate technology. For them, a smart farm will sound like a fairy tale. So let it be, a fairy tale of a smart farm. First of all, what is a smart farm? Smart Farming is a concept of farming management using modern Information and Communication Technologies to increase the quantity and quality of products.


AI could solve the healthcare staffing crisis and become our radiologists of the future

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It is almost 40 years since a full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine was used for the first time to scan a patient and generate diagnostic-quality images. The scanner and signal processing methods needed to produce an image were devised by a team of medical physicists including John Mallard, Jim Hutchinson, Bill Edelstein and Tom Redpath at the University of Aberdeen, leading to the widespread use of the MRI scanner, now a ubiquitous tool in radiology departments across the world. MRI was a game-changer in medical diagnostics because it didn't require exposure to ionising radiation (such as X-rays), and could generate images on multiple cross-sections of the body with superb definition of soft tissues. This allowed, for example, the direct visualisation of the spinal cord for the first time. Most people today will have undergone an MRI or know somebody who has.


Facial recognition is now rampant. The implications for our freedom are chilling Stephanie Hare

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Last week, all of us who live in the UK, and all who visit us, discovered that our faces were being scanned secretly by private companies and have been for some time. We don't know what these companies are doing with our faces or how long they've been doing it because they refused to share this with the Financial Times, which reported on Monday that facial recognition technology is being used in King's Cross and may be deployed in Canary Wharf, two areas that cover more than 160 acres of London. We are just as ignorant about what has been happening to our faces when they're scanned by the property developers, shopping centres, museums, conference centres and casinos that have also been secretly using facial recognition technology on us, according to the civil liberties group Big Brother Watch. But we can take a good guess. They may be matching us against police watchlists, maintaining their own watchlists or sharing their watchlists with the police, other companies and other governments.


ANALYSIS: How will insurance evolve in the age of AI? IOL Personal Finance

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Should Elon Musk's robot-surgeon start inserting electrodes into human brains to connect humans and computers via a high-bandwidth brain-machine? What exactly are the implications for medical insurance? Should a self-driving flying taxi crash and kill civilians? These are the questions our CEO, Lizé Lambrechts, is asking. The insurance industry is developing new ways to assess and underwrite risk as artificial intelligence (AI) and automation advance.


What leaders need to know about AI

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Organizations today are focused on identifying avenues to introduce AI into daily tasks and deliverables. While the common perception is that it creates a sense of insecurity among employees, contrary to this belief, employees are in fact more receptive and ready to deploy AI into their work, a study by Dale Carnegie reveals. During a roundtable discussion on "Preparing people for the Human Machine Partnerships of the future," conducted by Dale Carnegie in New Delhi, experts explored ways in which industry leaders can incorporate AI technology into their HR Tech, performance feedback systems, upskilling initiatives, etc. The panel discussion was led by Dale Carnegie representatives including Pallavi Jha, MD & Chairperson, Dale Carnegie of India; Mark Marone, Director - Research & Thought Leadership, Dale Carnegie and Associates; Juliette Dennett, Managing Director, Dale Carnegie Northern England; and Jordan Wang, Managing Director New South Wales, Dale Carnegie Australia. The survey that saw participation from 3,846 respondents across 13 countries, aimed to assess the readiness of the global workforce to accept AI in their work, feedback systems, skilling needs, etc., highlighted that 42 percent of the organizations globally are already using AI in one form or the other.


Canopius taps Arturo's AI-powered tech to improve risk management

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Specialty re/insurer Canopius has partnered with technology start-up Arturo on artificial intelligence (AI) and deep-learning property analytics. The integration of Arturo's AI-powered technology will enable Canopius to gain access to the physical property characteristic and predictive analytics using the latest satellite, aerial, and ground-level data. As a result, Canopius will be able to make more informed and differentiated pricing decisions at the point of underwriting. Canopius chief digital officer Marek Shafer said: "Arturo's, AI-powered image analytics capability is hugely impressive. Canopius is excited to be harnessing this pioneering technology, which will help to fine-tune our risk selection process and improve point-of-sale underwriting."


Lessons From Implementing AI In A People Business

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Charles Brayne is EY's UK Chief Tax Innovation Officer and Partner and has a dual role. On the one hand, he works with clients to help them adopt new tax technologies and on the other, he oversees the implementation of AI technologies within EY's own tax business. Meanwhile, as EY's UK Chief Tax Data Scientist, Harvey Lewis works directly with tax and law professionals to create and deliver new AI tools and applications, as well as provide strategic oversight for their automation projects. In this keynote, Charles and Harvey discuss EY's lessons from implementing AI within their own organisation. With flagship shows in San Francisco, London, New York, Munich, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Cape Town, 2019 will see over 30,000 delegates from businesses globally joining the AI revolution through The AI Summit events.


AI and bionic eyes are helping to contain raging wildfires

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On a tower in the Brazilian rain forest, a sentinel scans the horizon for the first signs of fire. They don't blink or take breaks, and guided by artificial intelligence they can tell the difference between a dust cloud, an insect swarm and a plume of smoke that demands quick attention. In Brazil, the devices help keep mining giant Vale working, and protect trees for pulp and paper producer Suzano. The equipment includes optical and thermal cameras, as well as spectrometric systems that identify the chemical makeup of substances. By linking them to artificial intelligence, a small Portugal-based company working with IBM Corp. believes it can help tame the often unpredictable affects of climate change.


Privacy campaigners warn of UK facial recognition 'epidemic'

The Guardian

Privacy campaigners have warned of an "epidemic" of facial recognition use in shopping centres, museums, conference centres and other private spaces around the UK. An investigation by Big Brother Watch (BBW), which tracks the use of surveillance, has found that private companies are spearheading a rollout of the controversial technology. The group published its findings a day after the information commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, announced she was opening an investigation into the use of facial recognition in a major new shopping development in central London. Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, has already raised questions about the legality of the use of facial recognition at the 27-hectare (67-acre) Granary Square site in King's Cross after its owners admitted using the technology "in the interests of public safety". BBW said it had uncovered that sites across the country were using facial recognition, often without warning visitors.