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How Cities Should Prepare for Artificial Intelligence

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It's time for city administrations and local employers to close AI-related skills gaps. This article is part of an MIT SMR initiative exploring how technology is reshaping the practice of management. While there is much discussion of how artificial intelligence will continue to transform industries and organizations, a key driver of AI's role in the global economy will be cities. How cities deal with coming changes will determine which ones will thrive in the future. Many cities have plans to become "smart cities" armed with AI-driven processes and services, like AI-based traffic control systems, to improve residents' lives.


Artificial intelligence to predict protein structure

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Proteins are biological high-performance machines. They can be found in every cell and play an important role in human blood coagulation or as main constituents of hairs or muscles. The function of these molecular tools is obvious from their structure. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a new method to predict this protein structure with the help of artificial intelligence. This is very difficult to detect, the experiments needed for this purpose are expensive and complex.


How AI is helping track endangered species Microsoft On The Issues

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The Hawaiian poʻo-uli, a small bird from the honeycreeper family, was first discovered in 1973. Less than half a century later, it disappeared from the planet. Declared extinct in 2018, it is one of almost 700 vertebrate species that have been driven to extinction in the last 500 years. According to a United Nations report issued earlier this year to policymakers, one million species are at risk of extinction: Human actions threaten more plants and animals than ever before. Although the precise number of species on the planet is difficult to calculate, recent estimates put it at around 8.7 million.


Smart Farming, or the Future of Agriculture

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We are a Ukraine-based company which means that our parents and grandparents lived in the era of infamous Soviet collective farms, where tractors were considered to be an ultimate technology. For them, a smart farm will sound like a fairy tale. So let it be, a fairy tale of a smart farm. First of all, what is a smart farm? Smart Farming is a concept of farming management using modern Information and Communication Technologies to increase the quantity and quality of products.


Health system execs eyeing AI investments, but lack vendor knowledge

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Adoption and investment in artificial intelligence and robotic process automation is still in its early growth stage in the healthcare industry, with just half of hospital leaders familiar with the technologies. WHY IT MATTERS These were among the results of a survey of 115 executives at hospital systems and independent hospitals in the United States, conducted by healthcare digitization vendor Olive and market research firm Sage Growth Partners. The study also found that nearly a quarter (23 percent) of health system executives are looking to invest in the two technologies today, and half said they plan to do so within the next two years. The top reasons cited for deploying AI technology included improving efficiency and reducing costs, improving the quality of care and improving patient satisfaction and engagement. While interest in AI and RPA technology is growing, the survey results also indicated that there is a lack of general knowledge as to where to procure the solutions or what vendors offer them, with more than half of survey respondents unable to name an AI or RPA vendor or solution.



AI could solve the healthcare staffing crisis and become our radiologists of the future

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It is almost 40 years since a full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine was used for the first time to scan a patient and generate diagnostic-quality images. The scanner and signal processing methods needed to produce an image were devised by a team of medical physicists including John Mallard, Jim Hutchinson, Bill Edelstein and Tom Redpath at the University of Aberdeen, leading to the widespread use of the MRI scanner, now a ubiquitous tool in radiology departments across the world. MRI was a game-changer in medical diagnostics because it didn't require exposure to ionising radiation (such as X-rays), and could generate images on multiple cross-sections of the body with superb definition of soft tissues. This allowed, for example, the direct visualisation of the spinal cord for the first time. Most people today will have undergone an MRI or know somebody who has.


Solving a Rubik's Cube with a dexterous hand

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In recent years, a growing number of researchers have explored the use of robotic arms or dexterous hands to solve a variety of everyday tasks. While many of them have successfully tackled simple tasks, such as grasping or basic manipulation, complex tasks that involve multiple steps and precise/strategic movements have so far proved harder to address. A team of researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Tencent AI Lab has recently developed a deep learning-based approach to solve a Rubik's Cube using a multi-fingered dexterous hand. Their approach, presented in a paper pre-published on arXiv, allows a dexterous hand to solve more advanced in-hand manipulation tasks, such as the renowned Rubik's Cube puzzle. A Rubik's Cube is a plastic cube covered in multi-colored squares that can be shifted into different positions.


Manchester City warned against using facial recognition on fans

The Guardian

Manchester City have been cautioned against the introduction of facial recognition technology, which a civil rights group says would risk "normalising a mass surveillance tool". The reigning Premier League champions are considering introducing technology allowing fans to get into the Etihad Stadium more quickly by showing their faces instead of tickets, according to the Sunday Times. If someone is recognised as having bought a ticket, they would be ushered in by a green light, and if not they would be halted with a yellow one. Hannah Couchman, the policy and campaigns officer at Liberty, said: "This is a disturbing move by Manchester City, subjecting football fans to an intrusive scan, much like taking a fingerprint, just so they can go to the Saturday game. "It's alarming that fans will be sharing deeply sensitive personal information with a private company that boasts about collecting and sharing data on each person that walks through the gate, and using this to deny people entry.