Information Technology


Paid Program: Humanizing Customer Care

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T-Mobile prides itself on being a disruptor in the world of wireless communications, always thinking creatively about the relationship it wants to have with its consumers. That includes the company's approach to using AI for customer service. Using the predictive capabilities of machine learning to improve customer service is a great example of AI augmenting human abilities. T-Mobile sees it as an opportunity to serve customers better and faster, benefiting not just the company and its service agents but also enriching the customer experience and creating stronger human-to-human connections. "Most industries have looked to use AI and machine learning to build more sophisticated Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems and chatbots as a means to deflect for as long as possible the interaction between a human customer service agent and the customer," says Cody Sanford, executive vice president and chief information officer at T-Mobile.


Machine Learning Engineer – NLP

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"The Personalization team makes deciding what to play next on Spotify easier and more enjoyable for every listener. We seek to understand the world of music and podcasts better than anyone else so that we can make great recommendations to every individual person and keep the world listening. Everyday, hundreds of millions of people all over the world use the products we build which include destinations like "Home" and "Search" as well as original playlists such as "Discover Weekly" and "Daily Mix."


Air Force Contracts MIT for Artificial Intelligence Research

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A new contract with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will bring airmen from across Air Force career fields to work with researchers on artificial intelligence technology. The project will focus on research in AI projects including decision support, maintenance and logistics, talent management, medical readiness, situational awareness, business operations and disaster relief, according to a news release. The effort is part of the service's science and technology strategy. Similar partnerships around the U.S. focus on other innovations.


'Neural Lander' uses AI to land drones smoothly

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Landing multi-rotor drones smoothly is difficult. Complex turbulence is created by the airflow from each rotor bouncing off the ground as the ground grows ever closer during a descent. This turbulence is not well understood nor is it easy to compensate for, particularly for autonomous drones. That is why takeoff and landing are often the two trickiest parts of a drone flight. Drones typically wobble and inch slowly toward a landing until power is finally cut, and they drop the remaining distance to the ground.


Zilliant Showcases End-to-End Pricing and Sales Growth Capabilities at MindShare 2019

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PND is a digest of pricing focused news, thought leadership, events, jobs, training and certification resources for pricing professionals. This Edition is brought to you by: Perfect Price The Perfect Price AI platform makes millions of pricing decisions for forward-thinking companies around the world.


Samsung AI Can Turn a Single Portrait Into a Realistic Talking Head

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There have been huge advancements in recent years in the area of AI "deepfakes", or fake photos or videos of humans created using neural networks. Fake videos of a person usually require a large number of photos of that individual, but Samsung has figured out how to create realistic talking heads from as little as a single portrait photo. In a newly published paper titled, "Few-Shot Adversarial Learning of Realistic Neural Talking Head Models," a team of researchers at the Samsung AI Center in Moscow, Russia, share their new system that has this "few-shot capability." Once it's familiar with human faces, it's able to create talking heads of previously unseen people using one or a few shots of that person. For each photo, the AI is able to detect various "landmarks" on the face -- things like the eyes, nose, mouth, and various lengths and shapes.


How to explore inaccessible places by swarms of sensors

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Since the dawn of humankind, exploration of certain places, ranging from the depths of the oceans to the edges of the universe, has led to numerous discoveries. However, there are also several environments that need to be examined but can't be directly observed, like chemical or nuclear reactors, underground water or oil distribution pipes, space and inside of the body. The EU-funded Phoenix project has been addressing this challenge by developing a new line of technology that will offer the opportunity to get to unreachable places. Imagine a scene where tiny sensors can move with the flow of liquid to explore a person's digestive tract or examine the quality of water pipes to predict and prevent leakages and losses. It may sound like sci-fi fantasy, but this is the vision of Phoenix, which is one step closer to creating versatile physical agents that will optimally explore unknown environments.


3 Questions: The social implications and responsibilities of computing

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Since February, five working groups have been generating ideas about the form and content of the new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing. That includes the Working Group on Social Implications and Responsibilities of Computing, co-chaired by Melissa Nobles, the Kenan Sahin Dean of the MIT School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences and a professor of political science, and Julie Shah, associate professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT and head of the Interactive Robotics Group of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. MIT News talked to Shah about the group's progress and goals to this point. Q: What are the main objectives of this working group? A: The goals of the working group are to think about how we can weave social and ethical considerations into the fabric of what the college is doing.


What Boards Need to Know About AI

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Being a board member is a hard job -- ask anyone who has ever been one. Company directors have to understand the nature of the business, review documents, engage in meaningful conversation with CEOs, and give feedback while still maintaining positive relationships with management. These are all hard things to balance. But, normally, boards don't have to get involved with individual operational projects, especially technical ones. In fact, a majority of boards have very few members who are comfortable with advanced technology, and this generally has little impact on the company.


Flipper-legged robot runs, swims, and is ready to hit the bigtime

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The aluminum-bodied robot weighs in at 16.5 kg (36 lb), and can run for a claimed five hours on one eight-hour charge of its user-swappable 28.8-V/7.2-Ah And while the prototype that we saw in Montreal at the 2019 International Conference on Robotics and Automation had six dual-purpose composite "legs," more swimming-efficient vinyl/steel-spring flippers can be substituted if it's going to only be used underwater – a place where it should be more eco-friendly than traditional remote-operated vehicles (ROVs).