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Street Lamps as a Platform

Communications of the ACM

Street lamps constitute the densest electrically operated public infrastructure in urban areas. Their changeover to energy-friendly LED light quickly amortizes and is increasingly leveraged for smart city projects, where LED street lamps double, for example, as wireless networking or sensor infrastructure. We make the case for a new paradigm called SLaaP--street lamps as a platform. SLaaP is proposed as an open, enabling platform, fostering innovative citywide services for the full range of stakeholders and end users--seamlessly extending from everyday use to emergency response. In this article, we first describe the role and potential of street lamps and introduce one novel base service as a running example. We then discuss citywide infrastructure design and operation, followed by addressing the major layers of a SLaaP infrastructure: hardware, distributed software platform, base services, value-added services and applications for users and'things.' Finally, we discuss the crucial roles and participation of major stakeholders: citizens, city, government, and economy. Recent years have seen the emergence of smart street lamps, with very different meanings of'smart'--sometimes related to the original purpose as with usage-dependent lighting, but mostly as add-on capabilities like urban sensing, monitoring, digital signage, WiFi access, or e-vehicle charging.a The future holds even more use cases: for example, after a first wave of 5G mobile network rollouts from 2020 onward, a second wave shall apply mm-wave frequencies for which densely deployed light poles can be appropriate'cell towers.'


2020 Supply Chain Technology Trends: Where Do Young Technologies Fit On A Maturity Curve?

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There are a number of young technologies that are getting a lot of buzz. But how mature are these technologies? Which of these technologies offer solid ROI, which are worth piloting, and which should be ignored? There are technologies that are proven and widely adopted. In supply chain management, examples would be transportation management, warehouse management, and other well-known supply chain applications.


Monash, Swinburne, and RMIT universities use optical chip to achieve 44Tbps data speed

ZDNet

A group of researchers from Monash, Swinburne, and RMIT universities have claimed that they have successfully tested and recorded the world's fastest internet data speed of 44.2Tbps using a single optical chip known as a micro-comb. The findings, published in the Nature Communications journal, revealed how the data speed achieved has the capacity to support high-speed internet connections of 1.8 million households in Melbourne, and users can download 1,000 HD movies in seconds. According to the researchers, the micro-comb, which is touted to be a smaller and lighter device than existing telecommunications hardware, was used to replace 80 infrared lasers and load-tested in infrastructure that mirrored networks used by the National Broadband Network. They did this by placing the micro-comb in 76.6km of installed dark optical fibres between RMIT's Melbourne city campus and Monash University's Clayton campus. The micro-comb was used to mimic a rainbow of infrared lasers so that each'laser' has the capacity to be used as a separate communications channel.


One Man Cannot Summon The Future…

#artificialintelligence

JA: In terms of the VMS market itself – it seems the leading players are more clearly defined, and some players are fading away. Would you agree with that? PR: Up to a certain point the basic video recording functionality is commoditised, what's not commoditised is the reliability with which that functionality can be carried out. Regardless, there will always be at least 3 competitors in any market. So, yes, the market is fragmented but is becoming less fragmented. JA: What in your opinion are the major VMS trends of the moment?


How to Curtail Oversensing in the Home

Communications of the ACM

Future homes will employ potentially hundreds of Internet of Things (IoT) devices whose sensors may inadvertently leak sensitive information. A previous Communications Inside Risks column ("The Future of the Internet of Things," Feb. 2017) discusses how the expected scale of the IoT introduces threats that require considerations and mitigations.2 Future homes are an IoT hotspot that will be particularly at risk. Sensitive information such as passwords, identification, and financial transactions are abundant in the home--as are sensor systems such as digital assistants, smartphones, and interactive home appliances that may unintentionally capture this sensitive information. IoT device manufacturers should employ sensor sensor permissioning systems to limit applications access to only sensor data required for operation, reducing the risk that malicious applications may gain sensitive information. For example, a simple notepad application should not have microphone access.


Is this the end of the control tower? This is what smart airports look like

#artificialintelligence

The transport sector expects a great deal from the air. Air transport has remained more or less stable over the last decades. However, technological innovations emerging in various areas, are threatening to change this scenario. This is illustrated, for example, with the steps taken towards making flying taxis a reality. Airports are aware of this situation.


World record breaking broadband speeds tested in Australia

Daily Mail - Science & tech

World record breaking broadband speeds have been recorded in Australia by scientists, who say they could download 1,000 HD movies in under a second. The team from Monash, Swinburne and RMIT universities recorded a speed of 44.2 terabits per second - the first time speeds like that have been recorded'in the wild'. This is a stark contrast to the average broadband speed in Australia - which is about 11 megabits per second, according to content delivery provider Akamai. For comparison there are a million megabits in a terabit - so the new 44.2 Tbps connection is 4 million times faster than the average 11Mbps speed.


World's fastest internet speed sees download speeds 1 million-times faster than current broadband

The Independent - Tech

Researchers in Australia have achieved a world record internet speed of 44.2 terabits per second, allowing users to download 1,000 HD movies in a single second. A team from Monash, Swinburne and RMIT universities used a'micro-comb' optical chip containing hundreds of infrared lasers to transfer data across existing communications infrastructure in Melbourne. The highest commercial internet speed anywhere in the world is currently in Singapore, where the average download speed is 197.3 megabits per second (mbps). In Australia, the average download speed is 43.4 mbps – one million-times slower than the speeds achieved in the latest test. "There's a bit of a global race on at the moment to get this technology to a commercial stage, as the'micro-comb' at its heart is useful in a really broad range of existing technologies," Dr Bill Corcoran from Monash University, told The Independent.


China forms new plan to seize world technology crown from U.S.

The Japan Times

Beijing is accelerating its bid for global leadership in key technologies, planning to pump more than a trillion dollars into the economy through the rollout of everything from wireless networks to artificial intelligence (AI). In the master plan backed by President Xi Jinping himself, China will invest an estimated $1.4 trillion over six years to 2025, calling on urban governments and private tech giants like Huawei Technologies Co. to deploy fifth generation wireless networks, install cameras and sensors and develop AI software that will underpin technologies from autonomous driving to automated factories and mass surveillance. The new infrastructure initiative is expected to drive mainly local giants, from Alibaba and Huawei to SenseTime Group Ltd., at the expense of U.S. companies. As tech-nationalism mounts, the investment drive will reduce China's dependence on foreign technology -- echoing objectives set forth previously in the Made in China 2025 program. Such initiatives have already drawn fierce criticism from the Trump administration, resulting in moves to block the rise of Chinese technology companies such as Huawei.


Council Post: Connecting Everything For The Ultimate Experience

#artificialintelligence

Lately, I feel like my home-office chair doesn't understand me, which is disappointing given all the time we're spending hunkered down together. If only my chair was aware of my current situation: endless hours of videoconferencing, limited exercise, fitful sleep, a stiff back. Any time our regular routine undergoes a major disruption, everything feels off-kilter. Working from home is a big change for many of us, but opportunities exist for new experiences enabled by an array of increasingly smart devices. What if these devices could sense something was out of balance and collaborated on how to make us feel better?