Communications


r/MachineLearning - [R] Machine Learning Reproducibility Challenges and DVC

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When ML models need to be regularly updated in production, a host of challenges emerges. No one tool can do it all for you - organizations using a mix of Git, Makefiles, ad hoc scripts and reference files for reproducibility.


Maixduino SBC Combines RISC-V AI, Arduino Form Factor, and ESP32 Wireless Module

#artificialintelligence

Last year RISC-V cores made it into low-cost hardware with neural network and audio accelerator to speed up artificial intelligence workloads at the edge such as object recognition, and speech processing. More precisely, Kendryte K210 dual-core RISC-V processor was found in Sipeed MAIX modules and boards going for $5 and up. Since then a few other variants and kits have been made available including Seeed Studio Grove AI HAT that works connected to a Raspberry Pi or in standalone mode. Seeed Studio has now released another board with Kendryte K210 RISC-V AI processor, but based on Arduino UNO form factor and equipped with an ESP32 module for WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity. Typical applications would include smart home (robot cleaners or smart speakers), medical devices, factory 4.0 (intelligent sorting or monitoring of electrical equipment), as well as agriculture, and education.



r/MachineLearning - [D] Can AIs "like" music or art like we do, or would that require general intelligence?

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I saw a cool take yesterday, that we listen to music because it's a meaningful (it has patterns) adversarial example to our neural network. If we humans fit a good model of the world through exploration (I think the free energy principle says something like that? I don't totally get it), then we need to have incentives to find examples that counter our model, since that's the way we improve. Maybe art in general exploit something like that. Except some art is more simply explained because it just exploits things that help us/our genes survive (beautiful bodies, green sceneries).


Some Facebook users don't have the option to turn off facial recognition technology, study finds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A consumer advocacy group has discovered that not all Facebook users have access to a privacy setting that lets them opt out of the site's facial recognition technology. Consumer Reports examined a set of Facebook accounts and found that a significant number didn't have the ability to toggle off Face Recognition, a feature that uses facial recognition technology to identify users in tagged photos. That's despite Facebook announcing almost two years ago that all users would be able to opt out of facial recognition entirely through the setting. A consumer advocacy group has discovered that not all Facebook users have access to a privacy setting that lets them opt out of the site's facial recognition technology Users can control whether they're part of Facebook's facial recognition technology by selecting'privacy shortcuts' in the righthand corner of their News Feed. From there, select'Control face recognition' under Privacy.


The Rise Of The Machines - BBC Click

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We look at recent advances in the field of artificial intelligence and also addresses some of the issues surrounding the use of facial recognition. We try out the latest in virtual reality hardware and look at a camera system that could change the way that we watch football. Find us online at www.bbc.com/click


AI in 2040

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What does the field of Artificial Intelligence look like in 2040? It's a really hard question to answer since there are still so many unanswered questions about the nature of reality and computing. That's what keeps me going. Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive live streams! Join us at the School of AI: https://theschool.ai/


Facebook is experimenting with robots to push its AI research forward

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Facebook is certainly a high-tech company, but it's not one you would necessarily associate with robots. However, as the firm revealed today, that's exactly where its researchers are looking next -- trying to see how experiments in robotics can further its work in AI. A lot of firms, including Google, Nvidia, and Amazon, use robots as a platform to explore avenues of AI research. Controlling robots is, in many ways, trickier than challenges like playing board games and video games. With these latter tasks, researchers have access to simulated game environments, which allows AI agents to play and learn at accelerated speeds.


'Fortnite' pro Turner 'Tfue' Tenney sues esports team FaZe Clan over 'oppressive' contract

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Another sign that esports has become big business: One of its biggest star athletes, Turner "Tfue" Tenney is suing his pro team, FaZe Clan, over what he calls a contract that is "oppressive, onerous, and one-sided." In the complaint filed in California Superior Court in Los Angeles, Tenney, 21, charges that FaZe Clan, an esports organization with professional teams that compete in video games such as "Call of Duty, "Fortnite Battle Royale" and "Counter-Strike," has players sign gamer agreements so that the team will "essentially'own' Tenney and other content creator/streamers and professional gamers." A popular streamer on YouTube and Twitch, Tenney signed an agreement with FaZe Clan when he was 20. He says in the suit that FaZe Clan takes up to 80% of revenue paid by third parties for Tenney's services such as sponsored online videos. 'Minecraft' update: Video game gets new blocks, better villages, and pillagers with crossbows Cloud gaming: Microsoft and Sony team up for video games in the cloud, but what's it mean for gamers? Esports star Turner "Tfue" Tenney, shown here on his Twitch channel, is suing his team FaZe Clan, saying its contract is "oppressive" and takes up to 80% of his earnings. Tfue, who recently qualified for the $30-million Fortnite World Cup Finals in July in New York, has more than 10.7 million followers on YouTube, more than 6 million followers on Twitch, and 5.5 million Instagram followers. "Anti-competitive provisions" in the agreement prevent Tenney from pursuing other deals, the suit charges. FaZe Clan violates state law because it acts as a talent agency but does not have "the requisite talent agency license," the complaint charges. The esports organization also forced Tenney to drink alcohol at parties before he turned 21, the suit charges. Tenney wants the court to void the contract with FaZe Clan and award any suitable damages. "Until now, FaZe Clan has enjoyed the fruits of this illegal business model with impunity because no one could or was willing to stand up to Faze Clan," the suit says. Through this action, Tenney seeks to shift the balance of power to the gamers and content creators/streamers, those who are actually creating value and driving the industry. As a result of this action, others will hopefully take notice of what is going on and help to clean up esports."


Inside Facebook's robotics lab where it teaches six-legged bots to walk and makes its AI smarter

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Facebook isn't often thought of as a robotics company, but new work being done in the social media giant's skunkworks AI lab is trying to prove otherwise. The company on Monday gave a detailed look into some of the projects being undertaken by its AI researchers at its Menlo Park, California-based headquarters, many of which are aimed at making robots smarter. Among the machines being developed are walking hexapods that resemble a spider, a robotic arm and a human-like hand complete with sensors to help it touch. Facebook has a dedicated team of AI researchers at its headquarters in Menlo Park, California that are tasked with testing out robots. The hope is that their learnings can be applied to other AI software in the company and make those systems smarter.