Representation & Reasoning


Beware the hype around AI. It has fooled many

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By Ariel Procaccia Last March, McDonald's Corp. acquired the startup Dynamic Yield for $300 million, in the hope of employing machine learning to personalize customer experience. In the age of artificial intelligence, this was a no-brainer for McDonald's, since Dynamic Yield is widely recognized for its AI-powered technology and recently even landed a spot in a prestigious list of top AI startups. Neural McNetworks are upon us. Trouble is, Dynamic Yield's platform has nothing to do with AI, according to an article posted on Medium last month by the company's former head of content, Mike Mallazzo. It was a heartfelt takedown of phony AI, which was itself taken down by the author but remains engraved in the collective memory of the internet.



Facebook, Carnegie Mellon build first AI that beats pros in 6-player poker

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Pluribus is the first AI bot capable of beating human experts in six-player no-limit Hold'em, the most widely played poker format in the world. This is the first time an AI bot has beaten top human players in a complex game with more than two players or two teams. We tested Pluribus against professional poker players, including two winners of the World Series of Poker Main Event. Pluribus succeeds because it can very efficiently handle the challenges of a game with both hidden information and more than two players. It uses self-play to teach itself how to win, with no examples or guidance on strategy. Pluribus uses far fewer computing resources than the bots that have defeated humans in other games. The bot's success will advance AI research, because many important AI challenges involve many players and hidden information. For decades, poker has been a difficult and important grand challenge problem for the field of AI.


Artificial intelligence breakthrough: Self-taught AI solved Rubik's Cube in just 1 second

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"The solution to the Rubik's Cube involves more symbolic, mathematical and abstract thinking, so a deep learning machine that can crack such a puzzle is getting closer to becoming a system that can think, reason, plan and make decisions." An expert system designed for a narrow task, such as only solving a Rubik's Cube will forever be limited to that domain. But a system like DeepCubeA, boasting an adaptable neural net, can be used for other tasks, such as solving complex scientific, mathematical, and engineering problems. Stephen McAleer, a co-author of the new paper, told Gizmodo how this system "is a small step toward creating agents that are able to learn how to think and plan for themselves in new environments." Reinforcement learning works the way it sounds.


A university leader's glossary for AI and machine learning Inside Higher Ed

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Artificial intelligence, it seems, is infiltrating every corner of higher education. From improving the efficiency of sprinkler systems to supporting students with virtual teaching assistants, AI has quickly become a near-ubiquitous presence on some campuses. Colleges and universities are being asked to do more with less as they grapple with shifting demographics and the need to not just respond to, but also anticipate, the needs of today's students. And early returns suggest that AI can play a role in helping institutions tackle pernicious challenges -- from "summer melt" to student engagement -- and enable students to navigate the complexity of financial aid, admissions, campus life and course scheduling. In response, a growing number of products are touting AI and machine learning as part of their sales pitch.


AI solves Rubik's Cube in fraction of a second - smashing human record

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The human record for solving a Rubik's Cube has been smashed by an artificial intelligence. The bot, called DeepCubeA, completed the popular puzzle in a fraction of a second - much faster than the quickest humans. While algorithms have previously been developed specifically to solve the Rubik's Cube, this is the first time it has done without any specific domain knowledge or in-game coaching from humans. It brings researchers a step closer to creating an advanced AI system that can think like a human. "The solution to the Rubik's Cube involves more symbolic, mathematical and abstract thinking," said senior author Professor Pierre Baldi, a computer scientist at the University of California, Irvine.


Artificial Intelligence Market Growing at a CAGR of 36.6% and Expected to Reach $190.61 Billion by 2025 - Exclusive Report by MarketsandMarkets

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According to the new market research report "Artificial Intelligence Market by Offering (Hardware, Software, Services), Technology (Machine Learning, Natural Language Processing, Context-Aware Computing, Computer Vision), End-User Industry, and Geography - Global Forecast to 2025", published by MarketsandMarkets, the Artificial Intelligence Market is expected to be valued at USD 21.5 billion in 2018 and is likely to reach USD 190.6 billion by 2025, at a CAGR of 36.6% during the forecast period. Major drivers for the market are growing big data, the increasing adoption of cloud-based applications and services, and an increase in demand for intelligent virtual assistants. The major restraint for the market is the limited number of AI technology experts. Critical challenges facing the AI market include concerns regarding data privacy and the unreliability of AI algorithms. Underlying opportunities in the artificial intelligence market include improving operational efficiency in the manufacturing industry and the adoption of AI to improve customer service.


Rubik's cube solved in "fraction of a second" by artificial intelligence machine learning algorithm

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Researchers have developed an AI algorithm which can solve a Rubik's cube in a fraction of a second, according to a study published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence. The system, known as DeepCubeA, uses a form of machine learning which teaches itself how to play in order to crack the puzzle without being specifically coached by humans. "Artificial intelligence can defeat the world's best human chess and Go players, but some of the more difficult puzzles, such as the Rubik's Cube, had not been solved by computers, so we thought they were open for AI approaches," Pierre Baldi, one of the developers of the algorithm and computer scientist from the University of California, Irvine, said in a statement. According to Baldi, the latest development could herald a new generation of artificial intelligence (AI) deep-learning systems which are more advanced than those used in commercially available applications such as Siri and Alexa. "These systems are not really intelligent; they're brittle, and you can easily break or fool them," Baldi said.


AI solves Rubik's Cube in one second

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An artificial intelligence system created by researchers at the University of California has solved the Rubik's Cube in just over a second. DeepCubeA, as the algorithm was called, completed the 3D logic puzzle which has been taxing humans since it was invented in 1974. "It learned on its own," said report author Prof Pierre Baldi. The researchers noted that its strategy was very different from the way humans tackle the puzzle. "My best guess is that the AI's form of reasoning is completely different from a human's," said Prof Baldi, who is professor of computer science at University of California, Irvine.


AI and the Case of the Disappearing Textbooks

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Artificial Intelligence is making the transition to electronic-only publishing a necessity for textbook publishers. In a recent story, the BBC reported on how Pearsons, one of the largest textbook publishing companies in the world, is getting out of the print business. This is very much along the lines of Ford Motor Company announcing recently that they will stop producing cars. While the jury is still out on whether the latter is a good idea, in many respects. It is a matter of economics.