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Biotech startup Gero grabs €1.9M to hack ageing and COVID-19

#artificialintelligence

Based out of Singapore, Gero develops new drugs for ageing and other complicated disorders using its proprietary developed artificial intelligence (AI) platform. Recently, the company has secured $2.2 million (€1.9 million) in Series A funding, bringing the total capital raised since Gero's founding to over $7.5 million (€6.4 million). Gero's founder Peter Fedichev, said, "We are happy with the recognition and support from these strategic investors who themselves are acknowledged leaders in the fields of AI and biotechnology. This will help us attain the necessary knowledge at the junction of biological sciences and AI/ML technologies that is necessary for the radical acceleration of drug discovery battling the toughest medical challenges of the 21st century. We hope that the technology will soon lead to a meaningful healthspan extension and quality of life improvements " The round was led by Bulba Ventures with participation from previous investors and serial entrepreneurs in the fields of pharmaceuticals, IT, and AI.


This robot scientist conducted experiments by itself during COVID-19 lockdown

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An intelligent robot that works independently 21.5 hours a day is helping scientists at the University of Liverpool with their research using AI, its flexible arm and a customised gripper.


It's Time to Rethink Machine Learning Models in Financial Services

#artificialintelligence

Richard Harmon, Managing Director of Financial Services at Cloudera, discusses the importance of relevant machine learning models in today's age, and how the financial sector can prepare for future changes. The past six months have been turbulent. Business disruptions and closures are happening at an unprecedented scale and impacting the economy in a profound way. In the financial services sector, S&P Global estimates that this year could quadruple UK bank credit losses. The economic uncertainty in the UK is heightened by Brexit, which will see the UK leave the European Union in 2021.


3 Ways Artificial Intelligence Will Change Healthcare

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It's no secret that healthcare costs have risen faster than inflation for decades. Some experts estimate that healthcare will account for over 20% of the US GDP by 2025. Meanwhile, doctors are working harder than ever before to treat patients as the U.S. physician shortage continues to grow. Many medical professionals have their schedules packed so tightly that much of the human element which motivated their pursuit of medicine in the first place is reduced. In healthcare, artificial intelligence (AI) can seem intimidating.


As Covid-19 hounds the world, AI and IoT lead the charge in Healthcare 4.0 - ET HealthWorld

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By Pradeep Kolankari, Senior Director, Medical Devices and Healthcare, Capgemini At a hospital in Wuhan in China, robots and IoT devices were used to check patients' temperatures, as well as monitor their heart rates and sugar levels through a smart bracelet worn by patients. They also cleaned and disinfected the area, apart from providing food and medicines to patients. Best of all, they even entertained patients with some dance moves. Welcome to the age of the Internet of Things (IoT) in healthcare! Globally, the healthcare landscape is stretched.


Ex-Waymo engineer Levandowski sentenced to 18 months in prison

Engadget

US District Judge William Alsup has sentenced Anthony Levandowski, the former lead Waymo engineer at the heart of a trade secret legal battle between the Alphabet subsidiary and Uber, to 18 months in prison. Prosecutors sought a 27-month sentence, while Levandowski requested a one-year home confinement, telling the court that his recent bouts with pneumonia makes him susceptible to COVID--19. According to TechCrunch, Alsup shot his request down, explaining that home confinement and a short prison sentence "[give] a green light to every future brilliant engineer to steal trade secrets. That said, he allowed Levandowski to enter custody once the pandemic has subsided. Alphabet filed a lawsuit against Uber in 2017, accusing the company of colluding with its former employee to steal secrets from Waymo. While Levandowski didn't immediately join Uber after leaving the Google division that eventually became Waymo, the ride-hailing titan quickly acquired the self-driving truck startup he founded. In its lawsuit, Alphabet said its former employee downloaded over 14,000 confidential and proprietary design files for various Waymo hardware, including its LiDAR system. The two companies reached a settlement in 2018, with Waymo making sure that Uber would develop its own self-driving technology. In mid--March this year, Levandowski agreed to plead guilty to one count of stealing materials from Google to make other criminal charges go away. "The last three and a half years have forced me to come to terms with what I did.


3 Ways Artificial Intelligence Will Change Healthcare

#artificialintelligence

It's no secret that healthcare costs have risen faster than inflation for decades. Some experts estimate that healthcare will account for over 20% of the US GDP by 2025. Meanwhile, doctors are working harder than ever before to treat patients as the U.S. physician shortage continues to grow. Many medical professionals have their schedules packed so tightly that much of the human element which motivated their pursuit of medicine in the first place is reduced. In healthcare, artificial intelligence (AI) can seem intimidating.


AI Generator Learns to 'Draw' Like Cartoonist Lee Mal-Nyeon in Just 10 Hours

#artificialintelligence

A Seoul National University Master's student and developer has trained a face generating model to transfer normal face photographs into cartoon images in the distinctive style of Lee Mal-nyeon. The student (GitHub user name: bryandlee) used webcomics images by South Korean cartoonist Lee Mal-nyeon (이말년) as input data, building a dataset of malnyun cartoon faces then testing popular deep generative models on it. By combining a pretrained face generating model with special training techniques, they were able to train a generator at 256 256 resolution in just 10 hours on a single RTX 2080ti GPU, using only 500 manually annotated images. Since the cascade classifier for human faces provided in OpenCV-- a library of programming functions mainly aimed at real-time computer vision -- did not work well on the cartoon domain, the student manually annotated 500 input cartoon face images. The student incorporated FreezeD, a simple yet effective baseline for transfer learning of GANs proposed earlier this year by KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and POSTECH ( Pohang University of Science and Technology) researchers to reduce the burden of heavy data and computational resources when training GANs. The developer tested the idea of freezing the early layers of the generator in transfer learning settings on the proposed FreezeG (freezing generator) and found that "it worked pretty well."


Match vs. eharmony: Both are for serious relationships, but how do the dating sites compare in the UK?

Mashable

Though society has outgrown most cliché tropes that surrounded online dating in its early years, believing that meeting online can grow into a genuine connection can still be hard. If any dating sites can rekindle your hope that there's someone out there who wants the same thing you do, Match and eharmony are it. Technically speaking, online dating amplifies your selection of potential love interests to people you would never have stumbled upon IRL. It's the obvious next step after you've exhausted the qualified singles in your local dating pool, and the pandemic has made online dating an even more ubiquitous way to meet people than it already was. Since social distancing has essentially made hookups with strangers a non-issue, weeding out people who aren't taking dating seriously is easier than ever.


Monash University takes game-like approach to capsule endoscopy

ZDNet

Monash University researchers, together with researchers from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) and Deakin University, have developed a game-like system aimed at promoting a playful approach to a common medical procedure known as capsule endoscopy. The procedure typically involves using a tiny wireless camera with an ingestible sensor to capture footage of a patient's digestive tract, which can be uncomfortable and cause anxiety among patients. However, the system called InsideOut aims to humanise the process, according to project lead and director of the Exertion Games Lab at the Monash University's faculty of information technology Florian Mueller. InsideOut involves a wearable device and an imaging capsule that is swallowed by the patient. The wearable device is worn around the patient's waist and displays real-time video that is captured by the capsule.