Therapeutic Area


Artificial intelligence is paving the way for less invasive surgical training The McGill Tribune

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Repeated practice is necessary to achieve mastery, which is no exception for surgical residents who often train directly on patients for four to six years. However, in this hands-on learning environment, even a minor mistake can be serious. To protect against such fatalities, a McGill research team constructed a solution. "The implementation of competency-based surgical education, along with advances in virtual reality, has resulted in the development and utilization of virtual reality-based surgical simulators," Rolando Del Maestro, professor emeritus in neuro-oncology at McGill, said in an interview with The McGill Tribune. The Neurosurgical Stimulation and Artificial Intelligence Learning Centre recently published a study in JAMA Network Open.


AI challenge

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RSNA organizes data challenges to spur the creation of artificial intelligence (AI) tools for radiology. Data challenges engage the radiology community to develop datasets useful for training AI systems to perform clinically relevant tasks. Researchers then compete to create applications that perform defined tasks according to specified performance measures. The goal of each challenge is to explore and demonstrate the ways AI can benefit radiology and improve patient care. These AI data challenges are organized by the RSNA Radiology Informatics Committee.


DreaMed wins FDA clearance for AI insulin recommendation technology - Israel News - Jerusalem Post

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A person receives a test for diabetes during Care Harbor LA free medical clinic in Los Angeles, California September 11, 2014. DreaMed Diabetes, the Petah Tikva-based developer of personalized diabetes management solutions, has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for its artificial intelligence-powered insulin recommendations technology. The company's AI-based insulin dosing decision-support software, DreaMed Advisor Pro, aims to assist people with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) using insulin-pump therapy with continuous glucose sensors or blood glucose meters.


21st Century Cures Act driving FDA changes

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The Food and Drug Administration last year approved its first autonomous, artificially intelligent medical device. In a decision that seemed to take a page from science fiction, the FDA gave the OK to the IDx-DR, a device that uses artificial intelligence to analyze images of the back of a patient's eye to detect if they have diabetic retinopathy. It's the first FDA-approved device to provide a screening decision without requiring a clinician to interpret the results--which means providers who aren't eye specialists, such as primary-care physicians, can rely on it to screen for the eye disease. "Today's decision permits the marketing of a novel artificial intelligence technology that can be used in a primary-care doctor's office," Dr. Malvina Eydelman, director of the division of ophthalmic and ear, nose and throat devices at the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said at the time. "The FDA will continue to facilitate the availability of safe and effective digital health devices that may improve patient access to needed healthcare," she added.



Top 10 AI Applications in Healthcare & the Medical Field dynam.AI

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Interest in artificial intelligence continues to explode across every industry, but few areas offer more opportunities for drastic improvement of human life than the application of AI in healthcare and the medical field. Let's begin first with a definition. AI in healthcare and medicine means using data more effectively through machine learning algorithms to produce positive patient outcomes. The sheer amount of data created through IoT-enabled devices, the electronic medical record (EMR), and ever-expanding quantities of genetic data has made possible a large number of applications of artificial intelligence in healthcare. Check out the Harvard Business Review ranking of the potential value that these applications could bring to the healthcare industry. The underlying value of artificial intelligence is to enhance human decision-making and automate processes that are time- or resource-intensive for humans to perform.


Machines Treating Patients? It's Already Happening

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Rayfield Byrd knows when it's time to wake up every morning. The 68-year-old Oakland, Cal., resident hears a voice from the living room offering a cheery good morning. A little after 8 a.m. each day, a small yellow robot named Mabu asks Byrd how he's doing. Byrd has Type 2 diabetes and congestive heart failure, and about three years ago, he had surgery to implant a microvalve in his heart to keep his blood flowing properly. To stay healthy, he takes four medications a day and needs to exercise regularly.


Well-e robot is a new partnership between CHI Health and Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium

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A robot named Well-e will take therapy patients from the CHI Health Immanuel Rehabilitation Institute on a virtual field trip of the zoo. Well-e will connect patients receiving therapy for spinal cord and traumatic brain injuries with animals of the world from their wheelchairs and hospital beds.


Mapping the brain landscape for Alzheimer's disease using artificial intelligence

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A team of researchers lead by Brittany Dugger of UC Davis Health has been awarded a $3.8 million grant from the National Institute for Aging (NIA) to help define the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease in Hispanic cohorts. The five-year grant will fund the first large-scale initiative to present a detailed description of brain manifestations of the Alzheimer's disease in individuals of Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican descent. Hispanics, one of the fastest growing demographic groups in the U.S., have a higher risk of dementia than Non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). The demographic, genetic and environmental differences between individuals of Hispanic descent and NHWs can lead to different levels of disease risk and presentation. "There is little information on the pathology of dementia affecting people from minority groups, especially for individuals of Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican descent," said Brittany Dugger, assistant professor at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at UC Davis School of Medicine in Sacramento.


Mapping the brain landscape for Alzheimer's disease using artificial intelligence

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A team of researchers lead by Brittany Dugger of UC Davis Health has been awarded a $3.8 million grant from the National Institute for Aging (NIA) to help define the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease in Hispanic cohorts. The five-year grant will fund the first large-scale initiative to present a detailed description of brain manifestations of the Alzheimer's disease in individuals of Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican descent. Hispanics, one of the fastest growing demographic groups in the U.S., have a higher risk of dementia than Non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). The demographic, genetic and environmental differences between individuals of Hispanic descent and NHWs can lead to different levels of disease risk and presentation. "There is little information on the pathology of dementia affecting people from minority groups, especially for individuals of Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican descent," said Brittany Dugger, assistant professor at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at UC Davis School of Medicine in Sacramento.