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CVS Health tests self-driving vehicle prescription delivery

Boston Herald

CVS Health will try delivering prescriptions with self-driving vehicles in a test that begins next month. The drugstore chain said Thursday that it will partner with the Silicon Valley robotics company Nuro to deliver medicines and other products to customers near a Houston-area store. A CVS spokesman said the prescriptions will routinely be delivered within an hour of being ordered. Customers will have to confirm their identity in order to unlock their delivery after the vehicle arrives. Nuro has previously started partnerships to test the delivery of pizzas for Domino's or groceries for Kroger, also in the Houston area.


CVS Health tests self-driving vehicle prescription delivery

Associated Press

CVS Health will try delivering prescriptions with self-driving vehicles in a test that begins next month. The drugstore chain said Thursday that it will partner with the Silicon Valley robotics company Nuro to deliver medicines and other products to customers near a Houston-area store. A CVS spokesman said the prescriptions will routinely be delivered within an hour of being ordered. Customers will have to confirm their identity in order to unlock their delivery after the vehicle arrives. Nuro has previously started partnerships to test the delivery of pizzas for Domino's or groceries for Kroger, also in the Houston area.


The Future for Contactless Delivery

#artificialintelligence

The future for contactless product delivery is already here, and a pandemic seems to already be moving this trend forward. It just needs companies to implement and customers to accept the new delivery and tracking methods, along with other innovations, that will make this so. When this happens, we may one day look back and quietly thank the lowly coronavirus for catapulting us into a brighter future. One of the more iconic images from the early days of this disease comes from late March 2020, during San Francisco's citywide coronavirus lockdown, when "aspiring drone racing pilot" David Chen delivered a single roll of much-needed toilet paper to his friend Ian Chan in another part of the city. Chan captured the delivery on video and posted it to his Twitter feed, which ironically went viral.


Coronavirus tests the value of artificial intelligence in medicine

#artificialintelligence

Albert Hsiao, M.D., and his colleagues at the University of California, San Diego (USCD) health system had been working for 18 months on an artificial intelligence program designed to help doctors identify pneumonia on a chest X-ray. When the coronavirus hit the U.S., they decided to see what it could do. The researchers quickly deployed the application, which dots X-ray images with spots of color where there may be lung damage or other signs of pneumonia. It has now been applied to more than 6,000 chest X-rays, and it's providing some value in diagnosis, said Hsiao, director of UCSD's augmented imaging and artificial intelligence data analytics laboratory. His team is one of several around the country that has pushed AI programs developed in a calmer time into the COVID-19 crisis to perform tasks like deciding which patients face the greatest risk of complications and which can be safely channeled into lower-intensity care.


Coronavirus tests the value of artificial intelligence in medicine

#artificialintelligence

Albert Hsiao, M.D., Ph.D., and his colleagues at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) health system had been working for 18 months on an artificial intelligence program designed to help doctors identify pneumonia on a chest X-ray. When the coronavirus hit the U.S., they decided to see what it could do. The researchers quickly deployed the application, which dots X-ray images with spots of color where there may be lung damage or other signs of pneumonia. It has now been applied to more than 6,000 chest X-rays, and it's providing some value in diagnosis, said Hsiao, director of UCSD's augmented imaging and artificial intelligence data analytics laboratory. His team is one of several around the country that has pushed AI programs developed in a calmer time into the COVID-19 crisis to perform tasks like deciding which patients face the greatest risk of complications and which can be safely channeled into lower-intensity care.


France's New Online Hate Speech Law Is Fundamentally Flawed

Slate

The solution to online hate speech seems so simple: Delete harmful content, rinse, repeat. But David Kaye, a law professor at the University of California, Irvine, and the U.N. special rapporteur on freedom of expression, says that while laws to regulate hate speech might seem promising, they often aren't that effective--and, perhaps worse, they can set dangerous precedents. This is why France's new social media law, which follows in Germany's footsteps, is controversial across the political spectrum there and abroad. On May 13, France passed "Lutte contre la haine sur internet" ("Fighting hate on the internet"), a law that requires social media platforms to rapidly take down hateful content. Comments that are discriminatory--based on race, gender, disability, sexual orientation, and religion--or sexually abusive have to be removed within 24 hours of being flagged by users.


California Activists Ramp Up Fight Against Facial-Recognition Technology

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

"This is a bill being sold as a privacy bill, but it's a wolf in sheep's clothing," Matt Cagle, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, said in an interview. The ACLU, Electronic Frontier Foundation and other civil liberties groups held a virtual rally Thursday night to rail against the bill, calling it vaguely worded and potentially dangerous for low-income communities hit hard by the coronavirus. Their remarks were the latest shots fired from a campaign to halt the legislation. The bill's fate in California--which has pushed for more aggressive privacy protections in recent years--could foreshadow how a potentially huge market for facial recognition technology is regulated by other states. The bill calls for companies and agencies that use facial recognition tools in areas accessible to the public to "provide a conspicuous and contextually appropriate notice" that faces may get scanned.


How to reverse-engineer a rainforest

Engadget

But 2019 was the year the earth burned. In Australia, the world watched in horror as bushfires destroyed 10.3 million hectares, marking the continent's most intense and destructive fire season in over 40 years. Earlier that fall, California saw more than 101,000 hectares destroyed, with damages upward of $80 billion. Alaska saw nearly a million. Record-breaking fires also hit Indonesia, Russia, Lebanon -- but nowhere saw the sheer mass of media coverage as the fires that tore through the Amazon nearly all last summer. By year's end, thousands of global media outlets had reported that Brazil's largest rainforest played host to more than 80,000 individual forest fires in 2019, resulting in an estimated 906,000 square hectares of environmental destruction. At the time, Brazil's National Institute for Space Research reported it was the fastest rate of burning since record keeping began in 2013. But amid the charred ruins of one of the largest oxygen-producing environments on the planet, a secret lies buried beneath the soil.


Breaking Through The Glass Ceiling - A Spring For Women In Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 06: Fei-Fei Li speaks onstage during The 2018 MAKERS Conference at ... [ ] NeueHouse Hollywood on February 6, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. After the COVID-19 pandemic is over and the economy reopens, many students will resume work on their careers. But for many young people, their priorities are going to shift. After seeing the pain and suffering caused by a single invisible enemy, some will naturally prioritize biomedical research over other easier and more lucrative trades, like law and finance. And some will choose to pursue possibly the most impactful area, which lies on the borderline of computer science and biomedicine - Artificial Intelligence (AI) for drug discovery.


Elon Musk and Grimes change baby's name: 'Roman numerals look better'

The Guardian

Tech entrepreneur Elon Musk and his partner Grimes have changed the unusual and largely unpronounceable name of their firstborn child. But anyone hoping that X Æ A-12 might be replaced by something a little more conventional, is going to be disappointed. In an Instagram post on Sunday, singer Grimes confirmed that the baby formerly known as X Æ A-12, would now be known as "X Æ A-Xii." Grimes gave no explanation for the change to using Roman Numerals, but later responded to a post asking if the alteration was made to comply with a California law that holds only the 26 letters of the alphabet can be used for child names. Looks better tbh," Grimes wrote. The couple appeared to have been at odds over how to interpret X Æ A-12 from the outset. The musician, whose real name is Claire Elise Boucher – previously explained that Æ is the Elven spelling of AI (for artificial intelligence) and explained "X" stands for "the unknown variable". Like how you said the letter A then I," wrote Grimes on Thursday in response to a query on Instagram.