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Here's How Elon Musk Plans to Put a Computer in Your Brain

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Elon Musk doesn't think his newest endeavor, revealed Tuesday night after two years of relative secrecy, will end all human suffering. At a presentation at the California Academy of Sciences, hastily announced via Twitter and beginning a half hour late, Musk presented the first product from his company Neuralink. It's a tiny computer chip attached to ultrafine, electrode-studded wires, stitched into living brains by a clever robot. And depending on which part of the two-hour presentation you caught, it's either a state-of-the-art tool for understanding the brain, a clinical advance for people with neurological disorders, or the next step in human evolution. The chip is custom-built to receive and process the electrical action potentials--"spikes"--that signal activity in the interconnected neurons that make up the brain.


Uber drivers and other gig workers in California could get better pay under proposed law

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Some Uber drivers in New York City want to see a decrease in the commission taken by the company. SAN FRANCISCO -- Gig economy workers are increasingly ubiquitous, shuttling us to appointments and delivering our food while working for Uber, Lyft, DoorDash and others. Thanks in large part to the app-based tech boom emanating from this city, 36% of U.S. workers participate in the gig economy, according to Gallup. But not all gigs are created equal, Gallup adds, noting that so-called "contingent gig workers" experience their workplace "like regular employees do, just without the benefits of a traditional job -- benefits, pay and security." California lawmakers are weighing what is considered a pro-worker bill that, if passed into law, would set a national precedent that fundamentally redefines the relationship between worker and boss by forcing corporations to pay up.


Elon Musk's Neuralink unveils effort to build implant that can read your mind

The Guardian

Elon Musk's secretive "brain-machine interface" startup, Neuralink, stepped out of the shadows on Tuesday evening, revealing its progress in creating a wireless implantable device that can – theoretically – read your mind. At an event at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, Musk touted the startup's achievements since he founded it in 2017 with the goal of staving off what he considers to be an "existential threat": artificial intelligence (AI) surpassing human intelligence. Two years later, Neuralink claims to have achieved major advances toward Musk's goal of having human and machine intelligence work in "symbiosis". Neurolink says it has designed very small "threads" – smaller than a human hair – that can be injected into the brain to detect the activity of neurons. It also says it has developed a robot to insert those threads in the brain, under the direction of a neurosurgeon.


Elon Musk wants to hook your brain up directly to computers -- starting next year

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Elon Musk, the futurist billionaire behind SpaceX and Tesla, outlined his plans to connect humans' brains directly to computers on Tuesday night, describing a campaign to create "symbiosis with artificial intelligence." He said the first prototype could be implanted in a person by the end of next year. Arriving at that goal "will take a long time," Musk said in a presentation at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, noting that securing federal approval for implanted neural devices is difficult. But testing on animals is already underway, and "a monkey has been able to control the computer with his brain," he said. Musk founded Neuralink Corp. in July 2016 to create "ultra-high bandwidth brain-machine interfaces to connect humans and computers."


AI/Machine Learning Part-Time Instructor job with University of California-Irvine 1825536

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University of California, Irvine AI/Machine Learning Part-Time Instructor Recruitment Period Open date: February 22nd, 2019 Last review date: Friday, Mar 1, 2019 at 11:59pm (Pacific Time) Applications received after this date will be reviewed by the search committee if the position has not yet been filled. Final date: Saturday, Feb 22, 2020 at 11:59pm (Pacific Time) Applications will continue to be accepted until this date, but those received after the review date will only be considered if the position has not yet been filled. Description At the University of California Irvine's Department of Continuing Education - Technology Programs, our mission is to provide the best technical professional development courses online. We are laser focused on inspiring our students to learn new technical coding skills and shaping the future for their success. We are passionate about our education programs that support our students to fulfil their career goals and we are empowered to help thousands of people learn online every day.


Tesla employees say they took shortcuts to meet aggressive Model 3 production goals

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Tesla has reigned over the electric car market for over a decade, but these new autos are hoping to give Tesla a run for their money. Current and former Tesla employees working in the company's open-air "tent" factory say they were pressured to take shortcuts to hit aggressive Model 3 production goals, including making fast fixes to plastic housings with electrical tape, working through harsh conditions and skipping previously required vehicle tests. For instance, four people who worked on the assembly line say they were told by supervisors to use electrical tape to patch cracks on plastic brackets and housings, and provided photographs showing where tape was applied. They and four additional people familiar with conditions there describe working through high heat, cold temperatures at night and smoky air during last year's wildfires in Northern California. Tesla can't appeal to women: Electric cars, Elon Musk may be off-putting Why I bought a Tesla: One woman's experience buying Elon Musk's sleek EV Their disclosures highlight the difficult balance Tesla must strike as it ramps up production while trying to stem costs. Tesla recently told shareholders that in the three months ending June 30, 2019, it made 87,048 vehicles, including 72,531 Model 3s, the company's lowest-priced sedan.


NEWS: Amazon is Working on an A.I. Household Robot

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Amazon Alexa, which sits in your house and accepts voice commands enabling it to play music, activate lights, read news headlines and many other functions, is one of several intelligent personal assistants currently vying for dominance alongside Google Home and the Apple HomePod. Now however, Amazon is aiming to take this technology one step further by implementing it in to an actual robot that can not only answer questions, but also move autonomously around your home. Codenamed'Vesta', the new device is currently being worked on by Amazon's Lab126 research and development arm in Sunnyvale, California. According to reports, the web giant had intended to reveal the robot earlier this year but it wasn't quite ready for mass-production and more engineers have since been assigned to help speed things along. Rumor has it that the robot will be about waist-high and can navigate using an array of cameras.


Teen Inventor Designs Noninvasive Allergy Screen Using Genetics and Machine Learning

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One of Ayush Alag's earliest memories is of biting into a chocolate bar with cashew nuts and suddenly feeling his throat get itchy. For most of his childhood, the Santa Clara, California resident avoided eating anything with cashews and other nuts that caused irritation as best as he could. By his middle school years, he and his parents wanted to know for sure: did he have a serious food allergy, like 32 million other Americans, or was it just a food sensitivity? They sought the help of an allergist, Joseph Hernandez of Stanford University. Hernandez told them that the difference between an allergy and a food sensitivity is huge.


Developing Deep Learning Analytics for Health Care

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The University of California, San Francisco is developing and training an artificial intelligence model that could help clinicians diagnose tears in knee cartilage. As many athletes and active people have learned, a tear in the knee cartilage, or the meniscus, can lead to long-term health and lifestyle consequences, from debilitating osteoarthritis to limits on physical activity. One of the keys to mitigating these consequences is to identify and treat tears in the meniscus early on, before the condition brings larger health issues. While this goal is pretty simple, the path forward is rather complicated. To diagnose a torn meniscus, clinicians need to review and interpret hundreds of high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices showing a patient's knee from different angles.


For Climbing Robots, the Sky's the Limit

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Robots can drive on the plains and craters of Mars, but what if we could explore cliffs, polar caps and other hard-to-reach places on the Red Planet and beyond? Designed by engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, a four-limbed robot named LEMUR (Limbed Excursion Mechanical Utility Robot) can scale rock walls, gripping with hundreds of tiny fishhooks in each of its 16 fingers and using artificial intelligence (AI) to find its way around obstacles. In its last field test in Death Valley, California, in early 2019, LEMUR chose a route up a cliff while scanning the rock for ancient fossils from the sea that once filled the area. For Climbing Robots, the Sky's the Limit: The climbing robot LEMUR rests after scaling a cliff in Death Valley, California. The robot uses special gripping technology that has helped lead to a series of new, off-roading robots that can explore other worlds.Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech LEMUR was originally conceived as a repair robot for the International Space Station.