FOX News


Airports begin to fight back against rogue drones with anti-incursion systems

FOX News

An estimated 7 million drones will be flying in the skies by 2020; Claudia Cowan reports on the new technology being developed to keep airports safe. But some people either don't care or use drones to intentionally disrupt airport operations. Last December, drone sightings at London's Gatwick Airport forced a three-day shutdown, and canceled flights left thousands of stranded passengers scrambling. No one has been arrested in the case, and this past April, investigators said it could have been an inside job. In recent months, suspected or confirmed drone activity has grounded flights in Dubai, New Zealand, Israel, and at Newark Airport in New Jersey.


Iran likely at 'inflection point,' launching attacks to change 'status quo,' Defense Intelligence Agency director tells Fox News

FOX News

Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley Jr., director of Defense Intelligence Agency, gives insight on recent Iranian attacks on tankers and a surveillance drone. EXCLUSIVE – Iran is likely at "an inflection point," and the recent attacks on tankers and the downing of a U.S. surveillance drone appear to be part of an effort to change "the status quo," the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) told Fox News exclusively. "I'd say that they're probably at an inflection point right now," the director, Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley Jr., explained in his first national TV interview as the leader of the nearly 17-thousand strong agency. Director Ashley said, based on their activity over the last several years, the Iranians would probably say they were in a "favorable" position with their influence over the Iraqi government and the likelihood their longtime regional ally -- Syrian President Bashar al-Assad -- will remain in power. But, Director Ashley -- whose agency's mission is to understand foreign militaries and the operational environment -- said the United States' withdrawal from the Iran deal and subsequent sanctions made a major impact on the regime.


Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson has hilarious reaction to getting own 'Jeopardy!' category

FOX News

Who is Dwayne'The Rock' Johnson? Here are some facts you may not know about the professional wrestler and actor. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson may be an international movie star whose films have grossed billions of dollars worldwide, but he was still honored when "Jeopardy!" recently dedicated a whole category of questions to his career. Johnson was pleased to announce that he wouldn't have any trouble answering the questions in the quiz show's "Mr. The 47-year-old posted his hilarious reaction to the surprise on Instagram Friday. "I'll take the entire Mr. Dwayne Johnson category for the MF'n win, Alex," he posted along with a video clip from the show. "I finally proved I'm a brilliant cookie by answering more than two Jeopardy questions correctly," the "Fast & Furious" star continued. "I just shook my head, laughed and said'no f------ way, how cool is that!?' when I found out I have my own Jeopardy category.


Doug MacKinnon: Will you survive the coming blackout?

FOX News

There are many never-ending debates between Republicans and Democrats. Impeach vs. don't impeach; capital punishment vs. life in prison; wall vs. no wall; legalizing marijuana vs. not; self-driving cars vs. human drivers; Red Sox vs. Yankees; takeout vs. home-cooked; or Gone With the Wind vs. any other movie. All of these issues are stunningly important, right up to the second where cataclysm falls and creates a nightmare scenario that so many fear. That cataclysm is a complete loss of electricity and every mode of convenience and survival we take for granted. IS NORTH KOREA'S EMP THREAT REAL OR'SOMETHING OUT OF A JAMES BOND MOVIE'?


When smart devices watch you, what do they do with the data?

FOX News

Kurt'The Cyber Guy' Knutsson breaks down how to keep Alexa from listening in. Think of all the things a microphone can pick up: voices, noises, whispers, conversations, arguments, confessions – even people alone, in a room, mumbling to themselves. Think of all the things you say in a private space, all the weird things you do. Once those sounds have been saved, that data can be stored, edited, and manipulated and shared. Now, think of all the things a camera can see, record, save, and share with who knows who.


Historian explores 'Adolf Island' in doc, claims she faced 'hostility' in isle that housed concentration camps

FOX News

Caroline Sturdy Colls believes the number of deaths on the British island of Alderney during World War II is almost double to what was previously thought due to hidden unmarked graves. The professor, who specializes in the forensic investigation of Nazi crime scenes, chronicled her investigation in a new documentary for the Smithsonian Channel titled "Adolf Island," which aims to examine the horrific events. According to the show, only 389 bodies have ever been found. However, Colls told Fox News her "conservative estimate" is "around 700 people." The BBC previously reported Alderney was once home to several labor camps, as well as a concentration camp called Lager Sylt, which housed thousands of slave labors between 1940 to 1945.


Iranian state TV claims to show debris from downed drone

FOX News

Iranian state television published images on its website Friday morning that claimed show debris from a U.S. military surveillance drone the country shot down Thursday. The pictures appear to show the skin of the U.S. Navy RQ-4A Global Hawk, which was shot down by a surface-to-air missile. The downing of the drone came just days after the administration blamed Iran for attacks on two oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz, adding to tensions in the region. The United States made a last-minute decision to call off retaliatory strikes against Iran in response to the downing Thursday of a Navy drone that Washington said was over international airspace, a source told Fox News early Friday. But few details about the aborted mission and the circumstances that led to the reversal were available.


Rep. Mark Green: If US doesn't respond to Iran, 'We are incentivizing future attacks'

FOX News

The U.S. must offer a "measured response" to Iran's downing of an American drone over the Strait of Hormuz, according to a Republican member of the House Homeland Security Committee. Failure to respond to Iranian aggression would incentivize future attacks, U.S. Rep. Mark Green, R-Tenn., told Shannon Bream on Thursday on "Fox News @Night." "I think we clearly need a measured response here," Green said. "I think the world needs to see, honestly, smoke and fire. I think Kim Jong Un needs to see smoke and fire. There's been an attack on the U.S. military and if we don't respond, we are incentivizing future attacks."


Jim Hanson: US should attack Iran militarily to retaliate for downing of American drone

FOX News

Trump calls the strike a'foolish move'; national security correspondent Jennifer Griffin reports. It's time for the U.S. to take military action against Iran – not to start a war, but to blow some things up in retaliation for Iran shooting down a U.S. surveillance drone Thursday in international air space, just days after setting off explosives that damaged two oil tankers. President Trump gave Iran a pass after the recent tanker attacks. But instead of reassessing their strategy and trying to de-escalate tensions, the Iranians escalated significantly by shooting down the American drone – a high-flying unmanned aircraft that costs about $130 million. I don't see how President Trump can let Iran's latest attack pass without action if he expects Iran and other nations to respect the U.S. and not conclude they can attack our forces at will, without fear of retaliation.


Iran says Revolutionary Guard shoots down US drone

FOX News

TEHRAN, Iran – Iran's state-run IRNA news agency says the country's Revolutionary Guard has shot down a U.S. drone. The U.S. military declined to immediately comment. IRNA said Thursday the drone was hit when it entered Iranian airspace near the Kouhmobarak district in southern Iran's Hormozgan province. IRNA, citing the paramilitary Revolutionary Guard, identified the drone as an RQ-4 Global Hawk. Bill Urban, a U.S. Central Command spokesman, declined to comment when asked if an American drone was shot down.