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Daily Mail - Science & tech


Dating app Grindr removes 'ethnicity filter' allowing users to search for potential partners by race

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Dating app Grindr has said it will remove its'ethnicity filter' that allows users to search potential matches by race. Singletons prepared to pay £12.99-a-month for the'premium' service are currently able to sort users based on their ethnicity, weight, height, and other characteristics. But less than 24 hours after its tweet supporting'Black Lives Matter' received widespread condemnation over the filter, the company has said it will delete it. Protests have rocked the US for six days following the death of George Floyd, who was filmed gasping'I can't breathe' as an officer knelt on his neck in Logan County, West Virginia. Writing on Twitter, the app said: 'As part of our commitment to (Black Lives Matter), we have decided to remove the ethnicity filter from our next release.


Good egg? Robot chef is trained to make the 'perfect' omelette

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A robot has been trained to prepare and cook an omelette from breaking the egg to presenting it on a plate to the diner by a team of engineers. Researchers from the University of Cambridge worked with domestic appliance firm Beko to train the machine to create the best omelette for the majority of tastes. The team say cooking is an interesting problem for roboticists as'humans can never be totally objective when it comes to food' or how it should taste. They used machine learning data from a study of volunteers and their reaction to different omelettes cooked in a variety of ways in order to train the robot. The omelette, made by the robotic chef'general tasted great – much better than expected' according to the research team who tested the resulting dish.


Tesla Model 3 'on Autopilot mode' crashes into truck in Taiwan

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Security cameras watching a highway in Taiwan captured the moment a white Tesla Model 3 vehicle plowing into truck that was rolled over on its side. Reports say the driver of the Tesla did not see the overturned Truck while cruising with the Autopilot driver assistant feature activated. The footage also shows that the car's emergency automatic braking system was applied at the last second, due to smoke coming from the tires moments before the collision. An image of the aftermath shows the entire front-end of the Tesla pierced through the roof of the truck, but reports note that neither of the drivers were injured. Tesla's Autopilot features allow the vehicle to steer, accelerate and brake automatically within a lane.


Glasses that can monitor your health and let you play video games with your eyes are developed

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Multifunction glasses that can monitor your health, let you play video games with your eyes and still work as sunglasses are developed by South Korean scientists. The groundbreaking new wearable tech built at Korea University, Seoul, can provide more advanced personal health data than devices like Fitbits or smart watches. Devices that measure electrical signals from the brain or eyes can help to diagnose conditions like epilepsy and sleep disorders -- as well as in controlling computers. A long-running challenge in measuring these electronic signals, however, has been in developing devices that can maintain the needed steady physical contact between the wearable's sensors and the user's skin. The researchers overcame this issue by integrating soft, conductive electrodes into their glasses that can wirelessly monitor the electrical signals.


'Passive' visual stimuli is needed to build sophisticated AI

Daily Mail - Science & tech

'Passive' visual experiences play a key part in our early learning experiences and should be replicated in AI vision systems, according to neuroscientists. Italian researchers argue there are two types of learning – passive and active – and both are crucial in the development of our vision and understanding of the world. Who we become as adults depends on the first years of life from these two types of stimulus – 'passive' observations of the world around us and'active' learning of what we are taught explicitly. In experiments, the scientists demonstrated the importance of the passive experience for the proper functioning of key nerve cells involved in our ability to see. This could lead to direct improvements in new visual rehabilitation therapies or machine learning algorithms employed by artificial vision systems, they claim.


Wild cockatoos excel in intelligence tests, countering theory living with humans makes birds smarter

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A longheld theory that animals raised in captivity perform better in cognitive testing may need to be rethought. A new study organized by the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna found evidence that wild animals perform just as well at intelligence tests as their lab-raised counterparts. To test the theory, researchers compared two groups of Goffin's cockatoos, a species often found in the tropical jungles of Singapore, Indonesia, and Puerto Rico. The team compared a lab-raised'colony' of 11 cockatoos at their lab in Vienna to eight wild cockatoos recently taken into captivity at a field laboratory in Indonesia. The researchers compared the performance of both groups in a series of simple problem solving tests and found the wild cockatoos were just as clever as the lab-raised ones.


Robot cars made by driverless technology company will deliver prescription medicine to CVS customers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The driverless car startup Nuro is deploying its fleet of robocars in Texas to deliver people's prescriptions. According to the company, its fleet of tiny self-driving cars will start delivering prescriptions next month to CVS customers in Houston at no extra charge. The company says it will start making deliveries with its autonomous fleet of Toyota Prius' and then switch to its smaller and more dedicated robot, the R2. For now, a safety driver will be accompanying the cars until Nuro switches to its completely autonomous R2. Eligible customers in three zip codes will be able to use the CVS website or the company's pharmacy app to order prescriptions online.


COVID-19 throat swab test robot developed by Danish researchers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A robot that is able to take throat swabs from coronavirus patients using a 3D printed arm was developed by a team of researchers from Denmark in just four weeks. The University of Southern Denmark says the world's first fully automated throat swab robot will be be able to test the first COVID-19 patients by late June. Using disposable 3D printed parts, the robot holds a swab and hits the exact spot in the throat where a sample needs to be collected every time. It puts the swab in a glass and screws the lid on to seal the sample without human input - reducing the risk of exposing healthcare workers to the deadly virus. A team of ten researchers for the Industry 4.0 Lab at the University of Southern Denmark worked around the clock to produce the prototype of the robot.


Twitter users stretch words such 'duuuuude' to modify their meaning

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Twitter users stretch words such as'yes', 'dude' and'hey' to modify their meaning, according to researchers who analysed 100 billion tweets. The US linguist experts say stretched words that convey a different meaning than the original are common feature of social media, but are rare in formal writing. For instance, 'suuuuure' can imply sarcasm, 'duuuuude' can be a sign of incredulity, 'yeeessss' may indicate excitement and'heellllp' may be a sign of desperation. Researchers say they've developed new tools that could be used in future research of stretchable words, such as investigations of mistypings and misspellings. These could also be applied to improve natural language processing for software and search engines and Twitter's spam filters, or even have applications in genetics.


NASA unveils new details about the high-powered instruments on Perseverance Mars rover

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA has shared new details about the sensors used on the Perseverance rover as it travels the surface of Mars in search for signs of past microbial life. The instruments, a high powered camera and an ultraviolet laser, will work in tandem to take readings of the soil to help determine its chemical and mineral makeup. The main instrument, called SHERLOC (or Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals), will be mounted on the end of one of the rover's robotic arms. NASA's Persevernce rover will travel across Mars using an ultraviolet laser to determine what minerals and compounds are present in the soil, based on the way the light scatters SHERLOC will emit a quarter-sized ultraviolet laser at the ground, and scientists will measure the way the light scatters when it hits the ground to infer what kind of minerals and chemical compounds it's made of. The technique will also be used to identify the unique spectral'fingerprint' that certain organic material might give off in the hopes of tracking down potential signs of past life.