us government


When Patent 'Professionals' Sound Like Children Who Learned to Parrot Some Intentionally-Misleading Buzzwords, Myths and Lies

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Posted in America, Europe, Law, Patents at 12:34 am by Dr. Roy Schestowitz Summary: With buzzwords like "AI" and misleading terms like "IP" the litigation zealots are trying to convince themselves (and the public) that software is a physical thing and a "property" which needs "protecting" from "theft"; it doesn't seem to bother these people that copyright law already covers software HOW can a patent office seriously assert that it is serious about innovation when everyone who meets the officials comes from law firms and rarely has any scientific background? If this system's inception truly dates back to need to advance science, shouldn't these officials focus on actual scientists? This may sound like a shallow observation, but it perfectly describes the pattern we've been seeing at the European Patent Office (EPO) under António Campinos and his predecessor Battistelli (neither of whom has any background in the sciences). Seeing how the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) wants to work around 35 U.S.C. § 101, we're nowadays witnessing a similar trend in America too. A resurgence of software patents in Europe poses risk to US (case)law as well.


Top-10 AI Startups in Central and Eastern Europe

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Some people think that "sustainable eating" means shopping exclusively at over-priced chains like Whole Foods but we're here to shut that myth down with two words – Almazan Kitchen. Who knew that a couple of Serbian guys cooking organic food in a forest with their pet owl could generate nearly 20 million views for a single video? Serbia is just one of many countries found in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), a region that consists of relatively small countries that gained independence after the collapse of the Soviet Union around 1989. As these countries transformed into democratic states with capitalistic economies only 30 years ago, they had to overcome unique handicaps compared to more developed nations in Western Europe – like no organic grocery stores. Still, most of the region has registered rapid GDP growth over time that was only slowed by the global financial crisis of 2008.


How artificial intelligence can allow providers to get a better handle on social determinants of health data

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Two new and seemingly unrelated approaches to delivering healthcare are starting to take shape in the industry: the use of artificial intelligence, and the integration of social determinants of health in crafting care plans. Both trends are developing independently, but they're likely due to intersect; factoring in SDOH is possible due to data, and if AI shines in any one particular area, it's making sense of complex data sets. If the social determinants are comprised of the socioeconomic factors that can influence a person's health -- income, education, access to transportation, etc. -- then AI has the potential to allow providers to make the best possible use of that information. That becomes increasingly important as value-based care emerges. With reimbursement increasingly tied to health outcomes, providers have a real incentive to ensure they're delivering the best care possible.


How artificial intelligence is shaping the future of society

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Maria Bartiromo explores the bounds of artificial intelligence usage globally. From health care to the transportation industry, FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo looks at how artificial intelligence (AI) is shaping the future of society. In February the U.S. government launched an American AI initiative, which aims to stimulate AI development. The government's investments in unclassified R&D for AI technologies is up 40 percent since 2015 and for the first time in history, President Trump's fiscal year 2019 budget requests to designate AI and unmanned autonomous systems a priority. However, some say the problem is that China spends much more on AI investment and financing.


AI 50: America's Most Promising Artificial Intelligence Companies

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Artificial intelligence is infiltrating every industry, allowing vehicles to navigate without drivers, assisting doctors with medical diagnoses, and mimicking the way humans speak. But for all the authentic and exciting ways it's transforming the tasks computers can perform, there's a lot of hype, too. As Jeremy Achin, CEO of newly minted unicorn DataRobot, puts it: "Everyone knows you have to have machine learning in your story or you're not sexy." The inherently broad term gets bandied about so often that it can start to feel meaningless and gets trotted out by companies to gussy up even simple data analysis. To help cut through the noise, Forbes and data partner Meritech Capital put together a list of private, U.S.-based companies that are wielding some subset of artificial intelligence in a meaningful way and demonstrating real business potential from doing so. One makes robots that can whir around shoppers to help workers restock shelves. Another scans recruiting pitches for unconscious bias. A third analyzes massive data sets to make street-by-street weather predictions. To be included on the list, companies needed to show that techniques like machine learning (where systems learn from data to improve on tasks), natural language processing (which enables programs to "understand" written or spoken language), or computer vision (which relates to how machines "see") are a core part of their business model and future success. Find all the details on our methodology here.


A Successful Artificial Memory Has Been Created

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We learn from our personal interaction with the world, and our memories of those experiences help guide our behaviors. Experience and memory are inexorably linked, or at least they seemed to be before a recent report on the formation of completely artificial memories. Using laboratory animals, investigators reverse engineered a specific natural memory by mapping the brain circuits underlying its formation. They then "trained" another animal by stimulating brain cells in the pattern of the natural memory. Doing so created an artificial memory that was retained and recalled in a manner indistinguishable from a natural one.


'Alexa, I want to make a political contribution.' Amazon to start voice-controlled donations to 2020 presidential campaigns

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Making a political donation to a presidential campaign is about to get as easy as -- well, saying it out loud. Starting next month, users of voice-controlled home assistant Amazon Alexa will be able to dictate their donations to a 2020 presidential campaign: "Alexa, I want to make a political contribution," or "Alexa, donate [amount] to [candidate name]." Alexa users can make donations of at least $5 and up to $200 to campaigns, and the feature is currently limited to presidential campaigns. Campaigns can sign up starting Thursday. The latest evolution in campaign technology raises new questions about how such contributions will be screened to make sure they are legal.


How artificial intelligence is shaping the future of society

#artificialintelligence

From health care to the transportation industry, FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo looks at how artificial intelligence (AI) is shaping the future of society. In February the U.S. government launched an American AI initiative, which aims to stimulate AI development. The government's investments in unclassified R&D for AI technologies is up 40 percent since 2015 and for the first time in history, President Trump's fiscal year 2019 budget requests to designate AI and unmanned autonomous systems a priority. However, some say the problem is that China spends much more on AI investment and financing. In 2017, AI spending hit $39.5 billion, with China accounting for 70 percent of the expenditures.


Ping An Leads Investment in Riverain Technologies to Advance AI in Healthcare

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Ping An Insurance (Group) Company of China, Ltd. (hereafter "Ping An" or the "Group", HKEX: 2318; SSE: 601318) is pleased to announce Ping An Global Voyager Fund is leading an investment of US$15 Million in Riverain Technologies, a leading provider of clinical artificial intelligence software used to efficiently detect lung disease at its earliest stages. Riverain Technologies markets advanced artificial intelligence imaging software used by leading hospitals around the world. The software significantly improves a clinician's ability to accurately and efficiently detect cancer and other cell anomalies in thoracic CT and X-ray images. The company's suite of patented ClearReadTM software tools are FDA-cleared, deployable in the clinic or in the cloud, and powered by the most advanced artificial intelligence and machine learning methods available to the medical imaging market. Its products are relied upon by leading healthcare institutions, including Duke University, Mayo Clinic, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, and Veterans Affairs hospitals.


Brad Pitt's space epic 'Ad Astra' sets 'new standard' for science fiction films, ex-NASA engineer says

FOX News

Jim Bridenstine says you have to go to the moon to get to Mars. The Brad Pitt-helmed space epic "Ad Astra" sets a new standard for science fiction films, a former NASA engineer who served as a technical consultant for the movie told Fox News. "In my view, it sets a new standard for science fiction films, updating for all to see on the big screen some of the most fantastic imagery we have obtained of our solar system since films like '2001: A Space Odyssey' were released over 50 years ago," said Robert Yowell, who served as an engineer at NASA for 11 years and as a senior mission manager for SpaceX. The new film, set in a future in which humanity has colonized a few far-flung parts of the galaxy but still hasn't reckoned with its own existential torments, is three films rolled cohesively into one: a visually stunning movie about astronauts exploring places like Mars and Jupiter; a poignant father-son tale about coming to grips with abandonment and growing up with a certain kind of dad; and a social commentary on 21st-century concerns over environmental degradation, capitalism and our place in the world. Roy McBride, a man on a mission to the edge of our galaxy that he can't really refuse.