Goto

Collaborating Authors

police


Utah man stabbed Tinder date to death hours after meeting her, police say

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A Utah man was arrested on Sunday after he called police claiming he had killed a woman he met on Tinder. Ethan Hunsaker, 24, surrendered to officers from the Layton Police Department and was charged with first-degree murder. He told police he had met the 25-year-old victim late Saturday night after connecting on the dating app.


Toy robot manufacturer announces spinoff company to make robots and AI products for law enforcement

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Sphero, a toy manufacturer known for making simple, programmable robots for kids, has launched a new spinoff business to develop AI and robotics for law enforcement, first responders, and other government agencies. The new entity is called Company Six (CO6) and will build on technology Sphero had previously developed through its Public Safety Division. The company hasn't announced any clients or new projects, but promises to focus on'lightweight, yet highly advanced robotic solution that provides critical awareness for those we depend on the most, including police, fire, EMT, military, and others with dangerous jobs.' Sphero's Paul Berberian, who previously served in the US Air Force, will step down from his role as CEO and take a new title as Chairman of both companies, according to a report in CNet. 'This is an opportunity to continue to bring revolutionary robotics technology to new markets to improve the lives of more people, our future leaders, and people with essential and sometimes dangerous job functions,' he said in a prepared statement. Sphero says the company has sold more than four million robots since it was founded in 2010.


'Star Wars' toymaker is creating robots for the police and military now

Mashable

Do you happen to own a remote controlled R2D2 or BB-8? Well, chances are that the purchase of your favorite Star Wars droid helped the toymaker behind it pivot into the military and police robot space! Sphero, the company behind those RC Star Wars droids, announced today in a press release that it was creating an independent "spin-off" company called Company Six. Company Six will create products "designed to deliver a lightweight, yet highly advanced robotic solution that provides critical awareness for those we depend on the most, including police, fire, EMT, military, and others with dangerous jobs," according to the release. This new company, by contrast, says it will work "to commercialize intelligent robots and AI-based software applications for first responders, government, defense, and those who work in dangerous situations."


Sphero spins off a new company to make robots for police, military use

Engadget

Sphero, the company behind robotic toys like the BB-8 robot and educational robotics kits, announced today that it's spinning its public safety division into a new company, dubbed Company Six. It plans to commercialize robots and AI software for first responders, government, defense and "those who work in dangerous situations." While Sphero didn't say that Company Six will make robots for police, it sounds like the new company could be headed in that direction. "Our team is excited to build critically-needed robotic hardware and advanced software solutions that help first responders and people with dangerous jobs," said Company Six CEO Jim Booth, formerly Sphero's COO. Sphero has brought four million robots to market, including programmable tank robots, and it's experience in mobility could come in handy.


Can AI Be Fairer Than a Human Judge in the Judicial System? -

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence has become an integral part of everything from medical diagnostics technology to systems that analyze electoral candidates and provide accurate information to voters. However, there are still many AI skeptics, and especially those who question the role of AI in the justice system. Many legal leaders and institutions are curious about the efficiency benefits AI brings to the field. But the big question is: can AI help make the judicial system fairer? Many claim that the United States' judicial system is one of the most robust in the world.


US start-up is testing drones in India to enforce social distancing

New Scientist - News

As countries around the world are gradually reopening following lockdowns, government authorities are using surveillance drones in an attempt to enforce social distancing rules. In India, police are using AI-equipped drones developed by US start-up Skylark Labs to monitor evening curfews and the distance between people who are outside during the day. The drones are being flown in six cities in the northern state of Punjab, and are also being trialled in the southern city of Bangalore, says Skylark Labs CEO Amarjot Singh. Each drone is fitted with a camera and an AI that can detect humans within a range of 150 metres to 1 kilometre. If it spots people it can send an alert to police in the district located nearest to the sighting.


US start-up is testing drones in India to enforce social distancing

New Scientist

As countries around the world are gradually reopening following lockdowns, government authorities are using surveillance drones in an attempt to enforce social distancing rules. In India, police are using AI-equipped drones developed by US start-up Skylark Labs to monitor evening curfews and the distance between people who are outside during the day. The drones are being flown in six cities in the northern state of Punjab, and are also being trialled in the southern city of Bangalore, says Skylark Labs CEO Amarjot Singh. Each drone is fitted with a camera and an AI that can detect humans within a range of 150 metres to 1 kilometre. If it spots people it can send an alert to police in the district located nearest to the sighting.


Police are failing to consult the public about their use of AI, charity warns

#artificialintelligence

The police are failing to consult the public about their growing use of technologies including artificially-intelligence facial recognition and automated decision systems (ADS), a charity has warned. South Wales Police is the only police force in the UK known to be using AI in its policing to have confirmed it consulted with its local communities about its use, according to a report from The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA). A Freedom of Information request returned in March found that London's Metropolitan Police Force, which began using live facial recognition tech in February following years of trials, had no record of consulting the public, despite suggesting that this would take place alongside deployment. The Met's software is deployed through signposted cameras focused on small areas to scan the faces of passers-by in areas the force believes are more likely to contain those wanted for serious and violent offences. The RSA sent requests to 45 territorial police forces, receiving confirmation that eight were using or trialling AI or ADS for policing decisions, including Durham Constabulary, Surrey Police and West Yorkshire Police.


How is AI being used to crack down on human trafficking?

#artificialintelligence

Human trafficking is a huge problem which has at times proved so difficult to solve. Largely operated by criminal organisations, there is often a lot of money involved in trafficking. Whilst money remains a massive incentive for criminal gangs, often trafficking is motivated by pure greed and lust – notoriously the'grooming gang' of Rochdale. Artificial Intelligence (AI) has recently been crucial in bringing traffickers to justice, so how do we use AI to put a stop to this? AI is already having a huge impact on human trafficking investigations in some parts of the worlds. Traffic Jam is a project started by American tech company Marinus Analytics.


How machine learning in policing could fuel racial discrimination

#artificialintelligence

The debate over the police using machine learning is intensifying – it is considered in some quarters as controversial as stop and search. Stop and search is one of the most contentious areas of how the police interact with the public. It has been heavily criticized for being discriminatory towards black and minority ethnic groups, and for having marginal effects on reducing crime. In the same way, the police use of machine learning algorithms has been condemned by human rights groups who claim such programs encourage racial profiling and discrimination along with threatening privacy and freedom of expression. Broadly speaking, machine learning uses data to teach computers to make decisions without explicitly instructing them how to do it.