Goto

Collaborating Authors

law enforcement


Want to blur a face in your video? These video and photo editing tools can help

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

To step onto city streets means taking your chances with cameras recording your every move. Over the years, surveillance tools such as face recognition and artificial intelligence have made it easier for states to capture and identify a person in schools, banks, stores or busy intersections. In some cases, our own phones serve as surveillance tools, with social media helping users spread their recordings. Most recently, a video taken by a bystander shows the death of 46-year-old George Floyd after a white police officer kneeled on the Floyd's neck, causing outrage and protests across the nation. Body-worn cameras are also used by police officers, making it a surveillance tool for both the law enforcement and members of the community.


Vesta raises $125 million to fight payment fraud with AI

#artificialintelligence

Payments solutions provider Vesta today announced that it raised $125 million in capital, bringing its total raised to over $145 million. The company says it will use the financing to grow and accelerate the deployment of its fraud protection and ecommerce payment products. Payment fraud is pervasive -- in 2018, $24.26 billion was lost due to credit card fraud worldwide, reports Shift Processing. That same year, the rate of card fraud increased by nearly 20% as the U.S. took the lead in reported losses. Vesta says its AI-powered decisioning platform helps clients to assess the risk of this fraud and ultimately to prevent fraud from occurring, with connectors that tie into existing software from vendors including Magento, Shopify, WooCommerce, BigCommerce, and SAP Commerce Cloud.


Street Lamps as a Platform

Communications of the ACM

Street lamps constitute the densest electrically operated public infrastructure in urban areas. Their changeover to energy-friendly LED light quickly amortizes and is increasingly leveraged for smart city projects, where LED street lamps double, for example, as wireless networking or sensor infrastructure. We make the case for a new paradigm called SLaaP--street lamps as a platform. SLaaP is proposed as an open, enabling platform, fostering innovative citywide services for the full range of stakeholders and end users--seamlessly extending from everyday use to emergency response. In this article, we first describe the role and potential of street lamps and introduce one novel base service as a running example. We then discuss citywide infrastructure design and operation, followed by addressing the major layers of a SLaaP infrastructure: hardware, distributed software platform, base services, value-added services and applications for users and'things.' Finally, we discuss the crucial roles and participation of major stakeholders: citizens, city, government, and economy. Recent years have seen the emergence of smart street lamps, with very different meanings of'smart'--sometimes related to the original purpose as with usage-dependent lighting, but mostly as add-on capabilities like urban sensing, monitoring, digital signage, WiFi access, or e-vehicle charging.a The future holds even more use cases: for example, after a first wave of 5G mobile network rollouts from 2020 onward, a second wave shall apply mm-wave frequencies for which densely deployed light poles can be appropriate'cell towers.'


California Activists Ramp Up Fight Against Facial-Recognition Technology

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

"This is a bill being sold as a privacy bill, but it's a wolf in sheep's clothing," Matt Cagle, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, said in an interview. The ACLU, Electronic Frontier Foundation and other civil liberties groups held a virtual rally Thursday night to rail against the bill, calling it vaguely worded and potentially dangerous for low-income communities hit hard by the coronavirus. Their remarks were the latest shots fired from a campaign to halt the legislation. The bill's fate in California--which has pushed for more aggressive privacy protections in recent years--could foreshadow how a potentially huge market for facial recognition technology is regulated by other states. The bill calls for companies and agencies that use facial recognition tools in areas accessible to the public to "provide a conspicuous and contextually appropriate notice" that faces may get scanned.


Meet 'Tala' the articial intelligence agent that speaks Samoan

#artificialintelligence

An artificial intelligence agent named Tala may open the door on a new way of gathering feedback from New Zealand's Samoan community. The Talanoa Project is a pilot project that uses IBM's artificial intelligence virtual agent solution, Watson, to interact in real time in Samoan for public consultation and community engagement. Developed and designed by Beca, business director Matthew Ensor said it was about consulting with'the silent majority' in the public on projects and community facilities. "We don't hear so much from the people where language is a barrier, where culturally there's no tradition of responding to public consultation. "We then created a conversational agent, it's like a chat-bot and what it does is it mimics the kind of conversation that you would have with a consultation expert," Mr Ensor said. "It will ask open questions about your thoughts on different things and really lets the person lead the conversation rather than a survey form where the questions are completely scripted." Steve O'Donnell from IBM New Zealand's Managing Partner for Global Business Services said this was the first time IBM Watson Assistant had been used for public consultation in New Zealand in a language other than English. "What we are seeing now is AI being able to scale down, and drive value in many industries," he said. "IBM Watson has already transformed the world of customer service, due largely to its ability to understand human sentiment and interact naturally with people and Tala is a promising first step towards that." The Talanoa Project, part funded by Callaghan Innovation, tested Tala among a few dozen Samoan speakers, asking them for their thoughts on their local community facilities. The focus group of Samoans ranged from 19-years of age to 77 being the oldest and included Samoan elders, law students, psychologists and sociologists. "It was overwhelmingly positive the response we got back from the Samoan community," Mr Ensor said. "We had a few people share that it was great to hear technology using their native language.


Infigos Software Solutions - Machine Learning driven fraud detection

#artificialintelligence

Fraud Analyser supports remote team coordination with a feature set that is strong on visual characteristics such as 1) Drop-down functionality to select different modelling techniques 2) Data manipulation functionality to remove or encode specific variables 3) Dashboards to track progress of data scientist activity and model development 4) Model comparator views 5) Periodic customer reports. To differentiate the solution from industry standards such as IBM ODM and FICO Blaze Advisor, Fraud Analyser comes with a dedicated data support team, so that product adoption is swift and easy. The platform is not sticky and enables easy exporting of work when done periodically.


One Man Cannot Summon The Future…

#artificialintelligence

JA: In terms of the VMS market itself – it seems the leading players are more clearly defined, and some players are fading away. Would you agree with that? PR: Up to a certain point the basic video recording functionality is commoditised, what's not commoditised is the reliability with which that functionality can be carried out. Regardless, there will always be at least 3 competitors in any market. So, yes, the market is fragmented but is becoming less fragmented. JA: What in your opinion are the major VMS trends of the moment?


Utah man stabbed Tinder date to death hours after meeting her, police say

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A Utah man was arrested on Sunday after he called police claiming he had killed a woman he met on Tinder. Ethan Hunsaker, 24, surrendered to officers from the Layton Police Department and was charged with first-degree murder. He told police he had met the 25-year-old victim late Saturday night after connecting on the dating app.


Police Arrest Utah Man Suspected of Killing His Tinder Date

U.S. News

Ethan Hunsaker, 24, called 911 early Sunday to report he'd killed someone inside a home in Layton, the Layton Police Department said in a prepared statement. When officers responded to the home, they found a woman lying on the floor with multiple stab wounds to her torso. Emergency workers tried to resuscitate her, but she died of her injuries at the scene. The woman's name was not immediately released.


Combating terrorism through artificial intelligence – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

Prevention of violent extremism in India is an important and necessary requirement for the country.