public safety


Fraud detection: the problem, solutions and tools

#artificialintelligence

"Fraud is a billion-dollar business There are many formal definitions but essentially a fraud is an "art" and crime of deceiving and scamming people in their financial transactions. Frauds have always existed throughout human history but in this age of digital technology, the strategy, extent and magnitude of financial frauds is becoming wide-ranging -- from credit cards transactions to health benefits to insurance claims. Fraudsters are also getting super creative. Who's never received an email from a Nigerian royal widow that she's looking for trusted someone to hand over large sums of her inheritance? No wonder why is fraud a big deal.


London Cops Will Use Facial Recognition to Hunt Suspects

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There will soon be a new bobby on the beat in London: artificial intelligence. London's Metropolitan Police said Friday that it will deploy facial recognition technology to find wanted criminals and missing persons. It said the technology will be deployed at "specific locations," each with a "bespoke watch list" of wanted persons, mostly violent offenders. However, a spokesperson was unable to specify how many facial recognition systems will be used, where, or how frequently. The Met said use of the technology would be publicized beforehand and marked by signs on site.


Rogue NYPD cops are using facial recognition app Clearview

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Rogue NYPD officers are using a sketchy facial recognition software on their personal phones that the department's own facial recognition unit doesn't want to touch because of concerns about security and potential for abuse, The Post has learned. Clearview AI, which has scraped millions of photos from social media and other public sources for its facial recognition program -- earning a cease-and-desist order from Twitter -- has been pitching itself to law enforcement organizations across the country, including to the NYPD. The department's facial recognition unit tried out the app in early 2019 as part of a complimentary 90-day trial but ultimately passed on it, citing a variety of concerns. Those include app creator Hoan Ton-That's ties to viddyho.com, which was involved in a widespread phishing scam in 2009, according to police sources and reports. The NYPD was also concerned because Clearview could not say who had access to images once police loaded them into the company's massive database, sources said.


London Police Roll Out Facial Recognition Technology

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The London Metropolitan Police have announced that it intends to begin using Live Facial Recognition (LFR) technology in various parts of the UK's capital city. The police explained that the technology will be "intelligence-led and deployed to specific locations in London," used for five to six hours at a time, with bespoke lists drawn up of "wanted individuals." As the BBC reports, the police claim the technology is able to identify 70 percent of wanted suspects while only generating false alerts once per 1,000 people detected by the system. The cameras will be rolled out within a month and clearly signposted. Police officers are going to hand out leaflets about the facial recognition technology and consult with local communities.


London Police Roll Out Facial Recognition Technology

#artificialintelligence

The London Metropolitan Police have announced that it intends to begin using Live Facial Recognition (LFR) technology in various parts of the UK's capital city. The police explained that the technology will be "intelligence-led and deployed to specific locations in London," used for five to six hours at a time, with bespoke lists drawn up of "wanted individuals." As the BBC reports, the police claim the technology is able to identify 70 percent of wanted suspects while only generating false alerts once per 1,000 people detected by the system. The cameras will be rolled out within a month and clearly signposted. Police officers are going to hand out leaflets about the facial recognition technology and consult with local communities.


The battle for ethical AI at the world's biggest machine-learning conference

#artificialintelligence

Facial-recognition algorithms have been at the centre of privacy and ethics debates.Credit: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg/Getty Diversity and inclusion took centre stage at one of the world's major artificial-intelligence (AI) conferences in 2018. But once a meeting with a controversial reputation, last month's Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS) conference in Vancouver, Canada, saw attention shift to another big issue in the field: ethics. The focus comes as AI research increasingly deals with ethical controversies surrounding the application of its technologies -- such as in predictive policing or facial recognition. Issues include tackling biases in algorithms that reflect existing patterns of discrimination in data, and avoiding affecting already vulnerable populations. "There is no such thing as a neutral tech platform," warned Celeste Kidd, a developmental psychologist at University of California, Berkeley, during her NeurIPS keynote talk about how algorithms can influence human beliefs.


Quick, cheap to make and loved by police – facial recognition apps are on the rise John Naughton

The Guardian

Way back in May 2011, Eric Schmidt, who was then the executive chairman of Google, said that the rapid development of facial recognition technology had been one of the things that had surprised him most in a long career as a computer scientist. But its "surprising accuracy" was "very concerning". Questioned about this, he said that a database using facial recognition technology was unlikely to be a service that the company would create, but went on to say that "some company … is going to cross that line". As it happens, Dr Schmidt was being economical with the actualité, as the MP Alan Clark used to say. He must surely have known that a few months earlier Facebook had announced that it was using facial recognition in the US to suggest names while tagging photos.


Video shows rescue workers help an injured hiker get down from atop of 400-foot cliff with a drone

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A 65-year-old woman in Utah's Snow Canyon State Park got some unexpected help from a drone operated by the local sheriff's department, after injuring her ankle while hiking with friends. While walking near the edge of Island in the Sky, a famous canyoneering and rock climbing route, she slipped and fell several feet, injuring her ankle to the point where she could no longer stand or support her own weight. The group of three friends she was with called the sheriff's search and rescue team rather than attempt to carry her back down the steep and sandy trail themselves. Search and rescue workers from the Washington Country Sheriff's Department in Utah used a drone to deliver then 660 feet of twine to help setup a rappelling system to get an injured hiker down from a clifftop The sheriff's team decided to bring the woman down from the 400-foot-tall cliff, the equivalent of 40 stories, by strapping her to a stretcher and using a rappelling system to guide her down. The only problem was they didn't have enough rope to reach actually reach the ground.


London Police to Deploy Facial Recognition Cameras Despite Privacy Concerns and Evidence of High Failure Rate

TIME - Tech

Police in London are moving ahead with a deploying a facial recognition camera system despite privacy concerns and evidence that the technology is riddled with false positives. The Metropolitan Police, the U.K.'s biggest police department with jurisdiction over most of London, announced Friday it would begin rolling out new "live facial recognition" cameras in London, making the capital one of the largest cities in the West to adopt the controversial technology. The "Met," as the police department is known in London, said in a statement the facial recognition technology, which is meant to identify people on a watch list and alert police to their real-time location, would be "intelligence-led" and deployed to only specific locations. It's expected to be rolled out as soon as next month. However, privacy activists immediately raised concerns, noting that independent reviews of trials of the technology showed a failure rate of 81%.


What is facial recognition - and how do police use it?

The Guardian

This is a catch-all term for any technology that involves cataloguing and recognising human faces, typically by recording the unique ratios between an individual's facial features, such as eyes, nose and mouth. The technology can be applied to everything from emotion tracking to animation, but the most controversial involve using facial features as biometric identifiers, that is, to identify individuals based on just a photo or video of their face. After a trial of the technology, the Metropolitan police have said they will start to use it in London within a month. On Friday, the force said it would be used to find suspects on "watchlists" for serious and violent crime, as well as to help find children and vulnerable people. Scotland Yard said the public would be aware of the surveillance, with the cameras being placed in open locations and officers handing out explanatory leaflets.