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U.S. Exempts Self-Driving Vehicles From Some Crash Standards

U.S. News

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O2 expands its 5G coverage in the UK to more than 150 locations

Daily Mail - Science & tech

O2 has rolled out its 5G network in 53 new towns and cities across the UK, pulling ahead of its rival EE to become the nation's biggest provider of ultra-fast mobile internet. The new locations include Birmingham, Durham and Portsmouth, bringing O2's total number of locations with 5G to 150. The network also allows for larger amounts of data to be transferred at once, which could one day help power technologies such as fully autonomous cars. O2 has rolled out its 5G network in 53 new towns and cities across the UK, taking it ahead of its rival EE to become the nation's biggest provider of the ultra-fast internet The network also allow for larger amounts of data to be transferred at once, which could one day help power technologies such as fully autonomous cars. For most consumers, 5G will allow you to carry out tasks on your smartphone more quickly and efficiently.


GM shows off flying car idea, the Cadillac Halo

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

General Motors has inched slightly closer to fulfilling its quest to put the world in flying cars. As part of the 2021 virtual Consumer Electronics Show on Tuesday, GM showed renderings and animation of what it dubbed its Cadillac Halo concepts: the Cadillac Personal Autonomous Vehicle, which is like a fancy self-driving taxi, and Cadillac Vertical Take-off and Landing (VTOL) vehicle, a sleek and futuristic drone-like flying car. "The VTOL is GM's first foray into air travel," said Michael Simcoe, GM's vice president of global design. Advances in electric vehicles and other technology are now "making personal air travel possible," he said. Simcoe's presentation came in the middle of GM CEO Mary Barra's keynote address to CES, the annual exhibition normally held in Las Vegas that features the latest technology.


Car screens didn't just go big at CES. They went 3D, with game-worthy graphics.

Mashable

The upcoming Cadillac Lyriq SUV is the first electric car for the Cadillac car brand, but it's the reimagined dashboard display spanning 33 inches across that attracts the most attention. Mercedes-Benz also has a massive 56-inch Hyperscreen that will be available soon in its first EV. These car screens and others introduced at the annual tech show CES feature a new user interface that looks more like a well-rendered video game than an infotainment display to turn up the heat or play a podcast. Past CES shows used to wow with announcements about bigger and bigger dashboard screens, but now it's about what's on them. The Lyriq's 33-inch LED display stands out on its own, but its graphics feel almost too sharp for a screen stuck in a car.


These Adorable Fish Robots Form Schools Like the Real Thing

WIRED

Seven little Bluebots gently swim around a darkened tank in a Harvard University lab, spying on one another with great big eyes made of cameras. They're on the lookout for the two glowing blue LEDs fixed to the backs and bellies of their comrades, allowing the machines to lock on to one another and form schools, a complex emergent behavior arising from surprisingly simple algorithms. With very little prodding from their human engineers, the seven robots eventually arrange themselves in a swirling tornado, a common defensive maneuver among real-life fish called milling. Bluebot is the latest entry in a field known as swarm robotics, in which engineers try to get machines to, well, swarm. And not in a terrifying way, mind you: The quest is to get schools of Bluebots to swarm more and more like real fish, giving roboticists insights into how to improve everything from self-driving cars to the robots that may one day prepare Mars for human habitation.


Cadillac of the sky: GM reveals flying autonomous car that hits 56mph - and a self-driving shuttle

Daily Mail - Science & tech

General Motors (GM) is taking its business to new heights by unveiling a flying self-driving taxi under its Cadillac brand at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). The American carmaker shared a concept video showcasing a single-seater electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) aircraft that tops speeds of 56mph. Not only is GM's future taking to the skies, but the video also showed it is heading down the road with a new luxury autonomous shuttle that seats two passengers. The concept vehicles were revealed during the firm's morning remarks at the tech conference that is being held virtually for the first time due to the lingering coronavirus pandemic. General Motors (GM) shared a concept video of two futuristic vehicles under the Cadillac brand.


Cadillac shows off a single-seater VTOL drone concept

Engadget

At GM's CES keynote, the company showed off a number of Cadillac vehicles, both real and imagined, to explain its vision for the future of transport. On the fantastic side, the company presented two concept vehicles that it says will exemplify its "halo portfolio." First up is a single-seater drone, a VTOL craft with a 90kW battery, that can travel from rooftop-to-rooftop at up to 90 kilometers (56 miles) per hour. Second is the "Personal Autonomous Vehicle," a self-driving box on wheels. GM says the craft behaves more like a "mobile living room" with an environment that can be fine-tuned to suit your needs.


GM will reveal its new Chevy Bolt and Bolt 'EUV' next month

Engadget

General Motors is almost ready to unwrap its revamped Bolt vehicles. Today, the automaker -- which just unveiled a new EV-inspired logo -- released a frustratingly short teaser and confirmed that two models will be formally revealed next month. One is a refreshed version of the classic Chevy Bolt, while the other is an "EUV," which apparently stands for Electric Utility Vehicle. We've known about the pair for some time: both were referenced as part of a GM event in March last year. The standard Bolt EV was supposed to come out in late 2020, but was pushed back due to the "current business situation," better known as the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.


New Car Technology Is Making Us Worse Drivers. But It Doesn't Have To.

Slate

"Tesla With Autopilot Hits Cop Car--Driver Admits He Was Watching a Movie." The headline from August was riveting--and easy for readers to dismiss as something that could never happen to them. While an unfortunate few can turn anything you hand them into an implement of disaster, most of us possess the common sense to not do anything so reckless while driving new automation-equipped cars. At least, we think we do. But shrug off that headline at your own peril.


CES 2021: The robots are still coming. These are some of the best ones on the way

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Even though the event is virtual, CES delivers no shortage of big screens or nifty gadgets. But let's be real: both of those are lame compared to the robots. Every year, tech lovers are wooed to CES by the prospects of a digital future inching closer towards that of The Jetsons: with cars taking to the skies and robots tending to our needs. We're still years away from the flying cars, but finding robots to help us with everyday chores, and maybe offer us a little companionship, might be closer than we think. Here's a peek at some of the robots at CES hoping to lend a metal hand. CES 2021:Hologram technology inspired by'Star Wars' could bring'new dimension' to smartphones Samsung trotted out not one, but two robots – and they're both absolutely adorable.