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Radical AI podcast: featuring Meredith Ringel Morris

AIHub

Hosted by Dylan Doyle-Burke and Jessie J Smith, Radical AI is a podcast featuring the voices of the future in the field of artificial intelligence ethics. In this episode Jess and Dylan chat to Meredith Ringel Morris about ability and accessibility in AI. What should you know about Ability and Accessibility in AI and responsible technology development? Meredith is a computer scientist conducting research in the areas of human-computer interaction (HCI), computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW), social computing, and accessibility. Her current research focus is on accessibility, particularly on the intersection of accessibility and social technologies.


'Exquisitely preserved' skull of tube-crested dinosaur found in New Mexico

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Scientists have found an'exquisitely preserved' skull of a herbivorous dinosaur species in New Mexico, known for its weird head adornment. The skull belongs to the iconic tube-crested dinosaur Parasaurolophus, which lived during the Late Cretaceous Period, about 76.5 million to 73 million years ago. The huge herbivorous reptiles sported trumpet-like nasal passages which they blew air into through the so-called tube on their head. This particular skull belonged to one particular species of the Parasaurolophus genus – Parasaurolophus cyrtocristatus. Despite its extreme morphology, details of the specimen show that the crest is formed much like the crests of other, related duckbilled dinosaurs. Tube-crested dinosaurs, known as Parasaurolophus, lived during the Late Cretaceous Period, about 76.5 million to 73 million years ago.


New Algorithms Could Reduce Racial Disparities in Health Care

WIRED

Researchers trying to improve healthcare with artificial intelligence usually subject their algorithms to a form of machine med school. Software learns from doctors by digesting thousands or millions of x-rays or other data labeled by expert humans until it can accurately flag suspect moles or lungs showing signs of Covid-19 by itself. A study published this month took a different approach--training algorithms to read knee x-rays for arthritis by using patients as the AI arbiters of truth instead of doctors. The results revealed radiologists may have literal blind spots when it comes to reading Black patients' x-rays. The algorithms trained on patients' reports did a better job than doctors at accounting for the pain experienced by Black patients, apparently by discovering patterns of disease in the images that humans usually overlook.


Fukushima College robot wins top prize for nuclear decommissioning

The Japan Times

Fukushima – A robot created by a team from a technology college in northeastern Japan recently won the top prize in a robotics competition that had the theme of decommissioning the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. The Mehikari robot of Fukushima College earned praise for its speed as well as ability to employ different methods to retrieve mock debris similar in size to that at the plant, the site of a nuclear disaster triggered by a massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. The robot completed the set task in about 2 minutes, the fastest time, in the annual competition aimed at fostering future engineers that was attended by students from 13 colleges belonging to the National Institute of Technology. Sunday's competition was the fifth of its kind. Students in 14 teams from the colleges across the country such as in Osaka and Kumamoto prefectures were tasked this year with developing robots to remove fuel debris from the plant, organizers said.


Designing customized "brains" for robots

Robohub

Contemporary robots can move quickly. "The motors are fast, and they're powerful," says Sabrina Neuman. "The hang up is what's going on in the robot's head," she adds. Perceiving stimuli and calculating a response takes a "boatload of computation," which limits reaction time, says Neuman, who recently graduated with a PhD from the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). Neuman has found a way to fight this mismatch between a robot's "mind" and body.


Hyundai debuts DAL-e: your future customer service robot

ZDNet

Hyundai has introduced DAL-e, an automated robot the company hopes will serve humans in an "intimate and personal way." DAL-e, short for "Drive you, Assist you, Link with you-experience," is a compact robot measuring 1,160x600x600 mm and weighing 80kg that can zip around shop floors and can be programmed to offer "bespoke" customer services. On Monday, the automaker said DAL-e is backed by artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), including language processing -- a useful addition to recognize queries and manage our accents -- facial recognition technologies, and mobility. Hyundai is currently demonstrating DAL-e in one of the firm's showrooms in Seoul, South Korea, with a view to use the pilot to improve the customer services robot's AI capabilities. DAL-e "independently communicates with people using precise recognition capabilities and mobility functions," Hyundai says, touting the robot as a means to lighten the load on existing, human staff.


Sony WH-1000XM4 review: Bose-beating noise cancelling headphones

The Guardian

Sony's top of the line noise-cancelling headphones have long had a winning formula and the latest edition has a much-requested addition – multiple device connectivity – to make them the best of class. The WH-1000XM4 have an RRP of £350 and on initial inspection little has changed for the fourth edition of the 1000X line, with its understated design. The high-quality plastic body is well made and lightweight at 254g but doesn't feel as premium as some metal or carbon fibre competitors that weigh more than 300g. They are some of the lightest-feeling headphones you can buy, matching the longstanding comfort kings, the Bose QC35 II. The ear cups are well padded with a gentle, even pressure on the side of your head while a soft leatherette headband sits on your dome.


JMU snaps Northeastern's conference win streak with 79-72 win

Boston Herald

Milestones can be evasive and winning streaks are fragile. The Northeastern Huskies experienced both with Sunday's 79-72 loss to James Madison at Solomon Court. The Huskies were denied an eighth straight victory since the start of conference play, leaving them one short of the program record set in 2012-13. The setback also prevented NU's 15th-year head coach Bill Coen (249-219) from equaling the program's career record of 250 victories set by Hall of Fame coach Jim Calhoun from 1972-1986. JMU improved to 7-4 and 1-1.


Turn Photos into Cartoons Using Python

#artificialintelligence

To create a cartoon effect, we need to pay attention to two things; edge and color palette. Those are what make the differences between a photo and a cartoon. Before jumping to the main steps, don't forget to import the required libraries in your notebook, especially cv2 and NumPy. The first main step is loading the image. Call the created function to load the image.


Deploy Deep Learning Models Using Streamlit and Heroku

#artificialintelligence

Deep Learning and Machine Learning models trained by many data professionals either end up in an inference.ipynb Those meticulous model architectures capable of creating awe in the real world never see the light of the day. Those models just sit there in the background processing requests via an API gateway doing their job silently and making the system more intelligent. People using those intelligent systems don't always credit the Data Professionals who spent hours or weeks or months collecting data, cleaning the collected data, formatting the data to use it correctly, writing the model architecture, training that model architecture and validating it. And if the validation metrics are not very good, again going back to square one and repeating the cycle.