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Can Auditing Eliminate Bias from Algorithms? – The Markup

#artificialintelligence

For more than a decade, journalists and researchers have been writing about the dangers of relying on algorithms to make weighty decisions: who gets locked up, who gets a job, who gets a loan--even who has priority for COVID-19 vaccines. Rather than remove bias, one algorithm after another has codified and perpetuated it, as companies have simultaneously continued to more or less shield their algorithms from public scrutiny. The big question ever since: How do we solve this problem? Lawmakers and researchers have advocated for algorithmic audits, which would dissect and stress-test algorithms to see how they work and whether they're performing their stated goals or producing biased outcomes. And there is a growing field of private auditing firms that purport to do just that.


The SolarWinds Body Count Now Includes NASA and the FAA

#artificialintelligence

Some blasts from the past surfaced this week, including revelations that a Russia-linked hacking group has repeatedly targeted the US electrical grid, along with oil and gas utilities and other industrial firms. Notably, the group has ties to the notorious industrial-control GRU hacking group Sandworm. Meanwhile, researchers revealed evidence this week that an elite NSA hacking tool for Microsoft Windows, known as EpMe, fell into the hands of Chinese hackers in 2014, years before that same tool then leaked in the notorious Shadow Brokers dump of NSA tools. WIRED got an inside look at how the video game hacker Empress has become so powerful and skilled at cracking the digital rights management software that lets video game makers, ebook publishers, and others control the content you buy from them. And the increasingly popular, but still invite-only, audio-based social media platform Clubhouse continues to struggle with security and privacy missteps. If you want something relaxing to take your mind off all of this complicated and concerning news, though, check out the new generation of Opte, an art piece that depicts the evolution and growth of the internet from 1997 to today.


Center for Applied Data Ethics suggests treating AI like a bureaucracy

#artificialintelligence

A recent paper from the Center for Applied Data Ethics (CADE) at the University of San Francisco urges AI practitioners to adopt terms from anthropology when reviewing the performance of large machine learning models. The research suggests using this terminology to interrogate and analyze bureaucracy, states, and power structures in order to critically assess the performance of large machine learning models with the potential to harm people. "This paper centers power as one of the factors designers need to identify and struggle with, alongside the ongoing conversations about biases in data and code, to understand why algorithmic systems tend to become inaccurate, absurd, harmful, and oppressive. This paper frames the massive algorithmic systems that harm marginalized groups as functionally similar to massive, sprawling administrative states that James Scott describes in Seeing Like a State," the author wrote. The paper was authored by CADE fellow Ali Alkhatib, with guidance from director Rachel Thomas and CADE fellows Nana Young and Razvan Amironesei. The researchers particularly look to the work of James Scott, who has examined hubris in administrative planning and sociotechnical systems.


Rapid Prototyping Artificial Intelligence Applications

#artificialintelligence

On February 11th 2019, the White House issued an Executive Order launching the "American AI Initiative", this initiative was followed by the release of www.AI.gov on March 20th 2019. The American AI Initiative encourages Federal Agencies to explore and grow AI capabilities. According to China's State Council, by 2030 China's AI industry could be worth $150 Billion.(Larson, Developing AI technology can be a challenging endeavor. An effective AI solution is a combination of workforce, internal governance, and technology innovation.


The SolarWinds Body Count Now Includes NASA and the FAA

WIRED

Some blasts from the past surfaced this week, including revelations that a Russia-linked hacking group has repeatedly targeted the US electrical grid, along with oil and gas utilities and other industrial firms. Notably, the group has ties to the notorious industrial-control GRU hacking group Sandworm. Meanwhile, researchers revealed evidence this week that an elite NSA hacking tool for Microsoft Windows, known as EpMe, fell into the hands of Chinese hackers in 2014, years before that same tool then leaked in the notorious Shadow Brokers dump of NSA tools. WIRED got an inside look at how the video game hacker Empress has become so powerful and skilled at cracking the digital rights management software that lets video game makers, ebook publishers, and others control the content you buy from them. And the increasingly popular, but still invite-only, audio-based social media platform Clubhouse continues to struggle with security and privacy missteps. If you want something relaxing to take your mind off all of this complicated and concerning news, though, check out the new generation of Opte, an art piece that depicts the evolution and growth of the internet from 1997 to today.


Beware the Dark Side of AI - Insurance Thought Leadership

#artificialintelligence

Apple Card's algorithm sparked an investigation soon after it launched when it appeared to offer wives lower credit lines than their husbands. Within the Biden administration's first weeks, the Office of Science and Technology Policy has been elevated to a cabinet-level position. Biden has appointed Alondra Nelson as deputy director. She is a scholar of science, technology and social inequality. In her acceptance speech, Nelson shared, "When we provide inputs to the algorithm, when we program the device, when we design, test and research, we are making human choices."


MSCHF's latest drop lets you control a Boston Dynamics robot with a paintball gun on its back

#artificialintelligence

At least one future is here right now. The prankster art / marketing collective MSCHF recently spent $74,500 to purchase a Spot robo-dog from Boston Dynamics. It mounted a Tippmann 98 paintball gun on its back and is allowing people around the world to remotely control the bot via their phones in an art gallery filled with its own work for two minutes at a time. MSCHF is calling it Spot's Rampage, and the event is happening on February 24th at 1PM ET. When killer robots come to America they will be wrapped in fur, carrying a ball.


NASA's Perseverance rover carried a family portrait of its robotic siblings to Mars

Engadget

Like any good piece of high-tech hardware, NASA's Perseverance rover features an Easter egg hidden in plain sight. Since landing on Mars on February 18th, NASA has been sharing thousands of photos captured by the rover. And if you look close enough, as Space did, you'll catch a decal bolted to the top of its body. That decal depicts Perseverance and every single other NASA rover to successfully make it to the surface of Mars. This plaque I carry pays tribute to those who've gone before me, and to new possibilities ahead.


Five Tips For Life Sciences Companies To Protect Their AI Technologies

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) has revolutionized many technology areas. As a few examples, it has already been instrumental in improving and enabling voice recognition algorithms, digital assistants, advertisement recommendation engines and financial trading applications.[1] Significant investment is being made for further development of this promising new technology, with R&D spending on AI predicted to reach $57.6 billion by the end of 2021.[2] Along with these R&D efforts, companies are also trying to protect and monetize their AI inventions, in some cases opting to seek patent protection. From 2002 to 2018, the number of AI patent applications filed with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) more than doubled, from 30,000 to 60,000.[3] These R&D efforts are no longer limited to software companies.


Biden's trade attack on China will reverberate around the world

#artificialintelligence

It does design and manufacture chips – Huawei designs the chips for its 5G equipment and smartphones – but can't produce the advanced chips that are central to technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning and the Internet of Things. Nevertheless its open ambition, supported by billions of dollars of state funding, is to become the major player in the sector as part of its broader ambition to dominate the building blocks of key 21st Century technologies. The US Congress has authorised subsidies for companies that invest in domestic chip research and manufacturing but not appropriated the funding for what would be a massively expensive program – semiconductor production is arguably the most sophisticated and challenging manufacturing process ever developed. The current chip shortage has highlighted America's vulnerability to external shocks but the transformation in the relationship with – and US perceptions of – China during the Trump presidency is a key motivator of the push for reshoring.