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What happened when Waymo reenacted real fatal car crashes with its autonomous vehicle

Mashable

Waymo's autonomous vehicles were put through the gnarly paces of 72 simulations of fatal crashes for safety research. The Google spinoff company, which operates its self-driving car service in the area just outside Phoenix, released a study Monday showing how its autonomous vehicles would respond during unsafe driving situations. The company collected crash information from 72 real fatal crashes with human drivers at the wheel that took place in the Chandler, Arizona, area between 2008 and 2017. Researchers reconstructed them in a virtual simulation, with the Waymo vehicle replacing both the car that initiated the crash (called "the initiator" in the study) and the car responding ("the responder"). With Waymo replaced virtually in both positions of the crash, the company ran enough simulations (91 of them, to be exact, since some of the crashes involved just one car) to understand how its autonomous platform would respond in the situation.


Algorithm helps artificial intelligence systems dodge "adversarial" inputs

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In a perfect world, what you see is what you get. If this were the case, the job of artificial intelligence systems would be refreshingly straightforward. Take collision avoidance systems in self-driving cars. If visual input to on-board cameras could be trusted entirely, an AI system could directly map that input to an appropriate action -- steer right, steer left, or continue straight -- to avoid hitting a pedestrian that its cameras see in the road. But what if there's a glitch in the cameras that slightly shifts an image by a few pixels?


Honda Launches Advanced Self-Driving Cars in Japan

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Honda launched a self-driving car in Japan on Friday. Japanese automaker Honda has launched a limited roll-out of its new Legend, which it calls the most advanced driverless vehicle licensed for the road, in Japan. The Legend's capabilities include adaptive driving in lanes, passing and switching lanes in certain conditions, and an emergency stop function if a driver is unresponsive to handover warnings. The Legend's autonomy is rated Level 3 on a scale of 0 to 5; analysts said a true Level 4 vehicle, in which a car no longer requires a driver at all, is a long time off.


StackPath

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China five-year plan aims for supremacy in AI, quantum computing

Engadget

China's tech industry has been hit hard by US trade battles and the economic uncertainties of the pandemic, but it's eager to bounce back in the relatively near future. According to the Wall Street Journal, the country used its annual party meeting to outline a five-year plan for advancing technology that aids "national security and overall development." It will create labs, foster educational programs and otherwise boost research in fields like AI, biotech, semiconductors and quantum computing. The Chinese government added that it would increase spending on basic research (that is, studies of potential breakthroughs) by 10.6 percent in 2021, and would create a 10-year research strategy. China has a number of technological advantages, such as its 5G availability and the sheer volume of AI research it produces.


Teaching Home Robots

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At TRI, our goal is to make breakthrough capabilities in Artificial Intelligence (AI). Despite recent advancements in AI, the large amount of data collection needed to deploy systems in unstructured environments continues to be a burden. Data collection in computer vision can be both quite costly and time-consuming, largely due to the process of annotating. Annotating data is typically done by a team of labelers, who are provided a long list of rules for how to handle different scenarios and what data to collect. For complex systems like a home robot or a self-driving car, these rules must be constantly refined, which creates an expensive feedback loop.


Collaborative Intelligence: Humans and AI Are Joining Forces

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Artificial intelligence is becoming good at many "human" jobs--diagnosing disease, translating languages, providing customer service--and it's improving fast. This is raising reasonable fears that AI will ultimately replace human workers throughout the economy. Never before have digital tools been so responsive to us, nor we to our tools. While AI will radically alter how work gets done and who does it, the technology's larger impact will be in complementing and augmenting human capabilities, not replacing them. Certainly, many companies have used AI to automate processes, but those that deploy it mainly to displace employees will see only short-term productivity gains. In our research involving 1,500 companies, we found that firms achieve the most significant performance improvements when humans and machines work together. Through such collaborative intelligence, humans and AI actively enhance each other's complementary strengths: the leadership, teamwork, creativity, and social skills of the former, and the speed, scalability, and quantitative capabilities of the latter. What comes naturally to people (making a joke, for example) can be tricky for machines, and what's straightforward for machines (analyzing gigabytes of data) remains virtually impossible for humans.


Top 10 Artificial Intelligence Technologies Making a Breakthrough in 2021

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Artificial intelligence is the technological blow that took the world by storm. When the term'artificial intelligence' was first coined at a conference, no one imagined that one day, it will replace all the repetitive jobs and relieve humans from performing heavy labour works. The advent of the internet helped technology to progress exponentially. Artificial intelligence stood alone for the past three decades, and now, it is streamlining with widespread sub-technologies and applications. From biometrics and computer vision to smart devices and self-driving cars, emerging trends are fuelling the AI craze. Henceforth, Analytics Insight has listed the top 10 AI technologies that are taking innovation to next level in 2021.


Computer Vision: Python OCR & Object Detection Quick Starter

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Free Coupon Discount - Computer Vision: Python OCR & Object Detection Quick Starter Quick Starter for Optical Character Recognition, Image Recognition Object Detection and Object Recognition using Python Created by Abhilash Nelson Students also bought Deep Learning Prerequisites: Logistic Regression in Python Deep Learning: Convolutional Neural Networks in Python Deep Learning A-Z: Hands-On Artificial Neural Networks The Complete Self-Driving Car Course - Applied Deep Learning The Complete Neural Networks Bootcamp: Theory, Applications Preview this Udemy Course GET COUPON CODE Description Hi There! welcome to my new course'Optical Character Recognition and Object Recognition Quick Start with Python'. This is the third course from my Computer Vision series. Image Recognition, Object Detection, Object Recognition and also Optical Character Recognition are among the most used applications of Computer Vision. Using these techniques, the computer will be able to recognize and classify either the whole image, or multiple objects inside a single image predicting the class of the objects with the percentage accuracy score. Using OCR, it can also recognize and convert text in the images to machine readable format like text or a document.


How artificial intelligence is saving Kiwi truck drivers' lives

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As the number of fatal crashes involving truck drivers increases, one company believes artificial intelligence (AI) could help. It may look like a standard mini-tanker, but a small camera in the truck's cab could be a lifesaver. The AI device scans the driver's eyes to detect signs of fatigue and distraction, and if their eye lids close for one and a half seconds, an alarm sounds and the driver's seat will vibrate. A camera also records the moment. "What this technology is about is keeping the driver focussed on the road, and alerting them for any reason if their attention is drawn away," said Charles Dawson, the chief executive of Autosense.