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What's on TV this week: 'Mass Effect,' 'Love, Death & Robots' and 'Castlevania'

Engadget

This week viewers can pick up some catalog titles in 4K, like Saw, as well as 20th Anniversary Edition versions of Shrek and the first Fast and the Furious movie. But the major launch this week is Bioware's remastered version of the Mass Effect trilogy, now available across console generations and on PC, with improved graphics, gameplay and almost all of the content ever released for the games. Otherwise, Netflix has the final season of Castlevania, as well as a new round of episodes in the Love Death & Robots anthology. HBO's feature film release of the week is Those Who Wish Me Dead, and if you're looking for something a little different then try Intergalactic, a sci-fi prison break series from the UK that's streaming on Peacock. Look below to check out each day's highlights, including trailers and let us know what you think (or what we missed). Let's Be Real, Fox, 9:30 PM Everything's Gonna Be Okay, Freeform, 10 PM All times listed are ET.


How The Big Four Dodged Pandemic And Made Record Earnings

#artificialintelligence

"The big tech is banking heavily on AI, Cloud and 5G technologies to retain customers and drive growth" A global emergency can smother your business, government lawsuits can break your company, competitors with trillion-dollar market value can wipe your organisation off the map. But what would happen when all three come together in the same year? The pandemic brought the world to a standstill. The internet giants, however, came out of it unscathed. Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook, popularly known as the big four, have not only survived a combination of calamities but registered profits and left the Wall Street analysts dumbfounded.


6 AI Myths Debunked

#artificialintelligence

"Artificial intelligence (AI)I will automate everything and put people out of work." "AI is a science-fiction technology." "Robots will take over the world." The hype around AI has produced many myths, in mainstream media, in board meetings and across organizations. Some worry about an "almighty" AI that will take over the world, and some think that AI is nothing more than a buzzword.


Budget 2021: Drones and aviation tech gets AU$32 million

ZDNet

Ahead of the 2021-22 Budget being handed down on Tuesday, the federal government has announced a new digital economy strategy, which it described as an investment into the settings, infrastructure, and incentives to grow Australia's digital economy. The strategy, costing just shy of AU$1 billion, is set to include work on "emerging aviation technologies". The government will be making a two-year, AU$32.6 million investment in an Emerging Aviation Technology Partnerships program to "support the use of emerging aviation technologies to address priority community, mobility, and cargo needs in regional Australia". The program will see the government partner with industry to look into tech such as electric engines, drones, and electric vertical take-off and landing aircraft. "This program will support the digital transformation of Australian businesses, increase business efficiency, and reduce carbon emissions through new technology," the government said.


Latest Tesla News Contradicts Musk's Claim; Could Be Bad News For Self-Driving Car Fans

International Business Times

A Tesla engineer has informed California regulators that the electric vehicle company might not have a fully self-driving vehicle ready for this year. The information comes from documents dated May 6 exchanged between the California Department of Motor Vehicles and several Tesla employees, including CJ Moore, the company's autopilot engineer. The documents were released by the legal transparency group PlainSite, which got them under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). In January, Tesla chief Elon Musk said he was "highly confident the car will be able to drive itself with reliability in excess of human this year." "Tesla is at Level 2 currently. The ratio of driver interaction would need to be in the magnitude of 1 or 2 million miles per driver interaction to move into higher levels of automation," California DMV noted in the memo.


Gigantic kites flown by robots could harness Mars's strong winds and power human colonies

Daily Mail - Science & tech

With NASA aiming to get humans to Mars by 2030, the idea of a long-term settlement on the Red Planet is getting closer to reality and scientists are working on innovated ways to power these habitats. Researchers in the Netherlands propose using massive kites to harness high Martian winds that would transformed into energy for colonists. The kite is attached by cable to a spindle. Similar kites are being developed to harness wind power on Earth, but these would be much larger, with a surface area of 530 square feet. Wind turbines and batteries are too heavy to bring to Mars via rocket, and the planet doesn't get enough sunlight to consider solar power.


Home video shows driver entering front door before deadly Tesla crash, NTSB says

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Federal investigators said Monday they were able to glean some insights into what might have happened after a fire erupted from a Tesla crash that killed two people in the Houston area in April and destroyed the vehicle's data recorder. . The National Transportation Safety Board released preliminary findings from its probe into the crash, which raised speculation about whether the vehicle's partially self-driving system, Autopilot, was to blame. The speculation stemmed from local authorities saying they were nearly positive that no one was behind the wheel when the vehicle crashed. The NTSB, in its preliminary report, said video footage from the vehicle owner's home security system showed him getting behind the wheel of the Tesla Model S and then slowly exiting the driveway. The vehicle traveled about 550 feet "before departing the road on a curve, driving over the curb, and hitting a drainage culvert, a raised manhole and a tree," according to the NTSB.


5 Levels of Autonomy (L3 – L5)

#artificialintelligence

Last week we discussed level 1 and 2 autonomy and this week we will move on to L3-L5 which is considered to be "true" autonomous driving. With L3 in certain situations (e.g., highway driving) the car can fully take over all driving tasks including lane changing, but the driver must be constantly paying attention and has to keep his/her hands near the steering wheel at all times and must be paying attention and not distracted by some other tasks such as watching tv, staring at a phone or sleeping. The reason the driver must always pay attention is that if the autonomous system finds itself in a situation it cannot handle (e.g., an unexpected detour or highway construction) it will provide a warning (e.g., seat vibrates or an alarm sounds) and then hand control back to the driver. L4 is a fully autonomous car that can perform all driving functions without fail and doesn't ever require intervention from the driver, though the driver has the option to take over at any time. The caveat however is that the autonomous function can ONLY be used in certain prescribed situations (e.g., proper weather conditions with certain visibility) or locations (e.g., in a well-mapped city or vicinity).


Delegate floor cleaning to this Roborock robot vacuum on sale for over $200 off

Mashable

SAVE $220: Let the Roborock S6 Pure robot vacuum and mop handle the rest of your spring cleaning. As of May 10, grab one for only $379.99 -- a 37% discount. Between high pollen counts, pets that shed, and all the crumbs scattered on a daily basis, keeping your floors clean is a huge task. Sure, you could make it a point to vacuum every day and mop every few days, but that would take up time you could otherwise spend relaxing. Instead, outsource your vacuuming and mopping to the Roborock S6 Pure robot vacuum and mop.


NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission will leave asteroid Bennu TODAY

Daily Mail - Science & tech

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission will leave asteroid Bennu today and begin its 1.4 billion mile, two year long journey back to the Earth, the space agency confirmed. OSIRIS-REx (the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer) was the first NASA mission to visit a near-Earth asteroid, survey the surface, and collect a sample to deliver to Earth. The spaceship was sent to study Bennu, an asteroid around the size of the Empire State Building and 200 million miles away, between the orbit of Earth and Mars. OSIRIS-REx gathered 2.1 ounces (60 grams) of rock and dust during its land and grab mission to the surface of the giant space rock, filling its storage compartment. It will begin its long journey home at 21:00 BST (16:00 EDT), with a live broadcast from NASA sharing the moment it fires its thrusters to push away from Bennu's orbit. If all goes to plan, OSIRIS-REx will orbit the sun twice, travelling 1.4 billion miles as it lines up with Earth, returning its samples in Utah on September 24, 2023.