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New robo-taxi is sleek and slim compared to other 'monstrosities'

Mashable

When a self-driving car passes by, you tend to notice. The towering sensors whirling around on the top of the car more than stand out. But Chinese autonomous vehicle company Pony.ai is reimagining the roofline for its next generation of autonomous taxicabs. As part of a partnership with autonomous vehicle sensor maker Luminar announced Monday, the Pony.ai Typical LiDAR sensors like those from Velodyne, Intel's Mobileye, and Waymo's own Laser Bear Honeycomb are mostly cone-shaped to help pull in a full 360-degree view from the top and around the car.


Artificial Intelligence Is Developing A Sense Of Smell: What Could A Digital Nose Mean In Practice?

#artificialintelligence

We already know we can teach machines to see. Sensors enable autonomous cars to take in visual information and make decisions about what to do next when they're on the road. But did you know machines can smell, too? Artificial Intelligence Is Developing A Sense Of Smell: What Could A Digital Nose Mean In Practice? Aryballe, a startup that uses artificial intelligence and digital olfaction technology to mimic the human sense of smell, helps their business customers turn odor data into actionable information.


Company Develops AI-Controlled Shoes That Help the Blind Avoid Obstacles

#artificialintelligence

Austrian company Tec-Innovation recently unveiled smart shoes that use ultrasonic sensors to help people suffering from blindness of vision impairment to detect obstacles up to four meters away. Known as InnoMake, the smart shoe aims to become a modern alternative to the decades-old walking stick that millions of people around the world depend on to get around as safely as possible. The currently available model relies on sensors to detect obstacles and warns the wearer via vibration and an audible alert sounded on a Bluetooth-linked smartphone. That sounds impressive enough, but the company is already working on a much more advanced version that incorporates cameras and artificial intelligence to not only detect obstacles but also their nature. Tec-Innovation partnered with Austria's Graz University of Technology to develop of state-of-the-art deep-learning algorithms modeled on neural networks that can analyze the information provided by sensors and cameras incorporated in the InnoMake shoe to determine whether an area is free obstacles and safe to walk on, and also distinguish between various types of obstacles. "Not only is the warning that I am facing an obstacle relevant, but also the information about what kind of obstacle I am facing.


Building racial and social equity into mobility: What can Ford do about it?

ZDNet

Over the past century, automakers helped transform US cities -- in good ways and bad. The industry helped people move freely, and it delivered good-paying jobs. At the same time, it profited off a network of highways that cut through cities, breaking apart communities of color. Now that the auto industry is at a turning point -- embracing transformative new products, services and business models -- there's an opportunity to root out the inequities built into existing transportation networks. With that opportunity, Ford also sees a chance to build up its reputation as a responsible corporate citizen.


Best security system in 2021: Secure your home or business

ZDNet

You don't need to spend a fortune on making your home office secure, and thanks to mobile technology, our options are now far beyond a locked door and window fastenings. Smart video doorbells that record both video and audio feeds in real-time when you have a visitor; motion and sound sensors that can be used in and outside, digital door locks, cameras with excellent night vision -- the range of products that leverage mobile connectivity, apps, and Internet of Things (IoT) sensors are endless. That is not to say that all smart home security products are created equal, and not every home needs to have bells and whistles on when it comes to security -- sometimes, a few select pieces can create a home ecosystem that is enough to protect your home (and office) against intruders, as well as alert you when suspicious activity is detected. It is also worth noting that any device with connectivity may contain vulnerabilities themselves that could be exploited -- and may endanger their users' privacy as a result -- and so when you pick an IoT device vendor, it should be one that maintains a frequent security program and patch cycle. ZDNet has created a list of recommendations suiting a variety of budgets and setups to help homeowners and remote workers decide how best to protect their properties, ranging from full kits to useful window sensors and cameras suitable for use both in and outdoors.


Pandemic Has Spurred CIOs to Crystallize the IT Strategy - AI Trends

#artificialintelligence

CIOs have tested many emerging strategies during the pandemic, including the Internet of Things sensors, low-orbit satellites, and augmented reality. Now the challenge is to get the technologies to work together to reach for big business goals. This was the message from Adriana Karaboutis, group chief information and digital officer at National Grid, speaking at the 2021 MIT CIO Symposium in a session on Accelerated Digital Transformation, held virtually recently. The effects of the crisis made organizations "double down on that focus and crystallization for what we need to do," she stated in an account in CIO Dive To pursue IoT, standardization is a must, suggested Harmeen Mehta, chief digital and innovation officer at BT, the British multinational telecommunications firm. "If the world can consolidate a bit on standardization, it will help pick up speed," stated Mehta.


Making skin for robots is hard. But success could bring huge benefits for humans, too

ZDNet

Gordon Cheng's lab at TUM is developing artificial skin to provide robots with tactile feedback. To recreate a human in robot form is no small piece of work. Researchers have already started modelling synapses and neurons in software and hardware. A robot that can move like a human? Researchers are already building artificial muscles, joints and tendons for the bipedal machines.


Artificial intelligence to monitor water quality more effectively

#artificialintelligence

Environmental protection agencies and industry bodies currently monitor the'trophic state' of water -- its biological productivity -- as an indicator of ecosystem health. Large clusters of microscopic algae, or phytoplankton, is called eutrophication and can turn into HABs, an indicator of pollution and which pose risk to human and animal health. HABs are estimated to cost the Scottish shellfish industry £1.4 million per year, and a single HAB event in Norway killed eight million salmon in 2019, with a direct value of over £74 million. Lead author Mortimer Werther, a PhD Researcher in Biological and Environmental Sciences at Stirling's Faculty of Natural Sciences, said: "Currently, satellite-mounted sensors, such as the Ocean and Land Instrument (OLCI), measure phytoplankton concentrations using an optical pigment called chlorophyll-a. However, retrieving chlorophyll-a across the diverse nature of global waters is methodologically challenging. "We have developed a method that bypasses the chlorophyll-a retrieval and enables us to estimate water health status directly from the signal measured at the remote sensor." Eutrophication and hypereutrophication is often caused by excessive nutrient input, for example from agricultural practices, waste discharge, or food and energy production. In impacted waters, HABs are common, and cyanobacteria may produce cyanotoxins which affect human and animal health. In many locations, these blooms are of concern to the finfish and shellfish aquaculture industries. Mr Werther said: "To understand the impact of climate change on freshwater aquatic environments such as lakes, many of which serve as drinking water resources, it is essential that we monitor and assess key environmental indicators, such as trophic status, on a global scale with high spatial and temporal frequency.


Nano flashlight enables new applications of light

#artificialintelligence

In work that could someday turn cell phones into sensors capable of detecting viruses and other minuscule objects, MIT researchers have built a powerful nanoscale flashlight on a chip. Their approach to designing the tiny light beam on a chip could also be used to create a variety of other nano flashlights with different beam characteristics for different applications. Think of a wide spotlight versus a beam of light focused on a single point. For many decades, scientists have used light to identify a material by observing how that light interacts with the material. They do so by essentially shining a beam of light on the material, then analyzing that light after it passes through the material.


Scientists develop £2,700 'shoe camera' that detects obstacles

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Computer scientists have created an'intelligent' shoe that helps blind and visually-impaired people avoid multiple obstacles. The £2,700 (€3,200) product, called InnoMake, has been developed by Austrian company Tec-Innovation, backed by Graz University of Technology (TU Graz). The product consists of waterproof ultrasonic sensors attached to the tip of each shoe, which vibrate and make noises near obstacles. The closer the wearer gets to an obstacle, the faster the vibration becomes, much like a parking sensor on the back of a vehicle. Tec-Innovation is now working on embedding an AI-powered camera as part of a new iteration of the product.