The Skeptic's Guide To Assessing Artificial Intelligence

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Once a general understanding of true AI is established, the only skepticism remaining typically stems from the fact that businesses looking to implement some type of AI may not trust providers to be honest about their products' capabilities. It's easy to say that a product has AI capabilities, but it's much harder to put true AI into practice. Since true AI will learn and become smarter over time, it's important to ask providers leading questions to determine if their technology has this capability.


Learning from Data to Create a Safer and Smarter Self-Driving Experience

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The automotive industry isn't just being driven by people -- it's also driven by data, particularly as automobile manufacturers move toward autonomous, self-driving vehicles. Last year, Waymo cars drove 1.2 million miles in California. Meanwhile, Tesla, with its Autopilot program, is actively collecting data from hundreds of thousands of vehicles to predict how its cars might perform autonomously. So far the company has collected hundreds of millions of miles worth of data. What are these autonomous vehicle manufacturers doing with all of that data?


Three Invaluable Ways AI and Neuroscience Are Driving Each Other Forward

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DeepMind's Demis Hassabis once pointed to the human brain as a paramount inspiration for building AI with human-like intelligence. The meteoric success of deep learning showcases how insights from neuroscience--memory, learning, decision-making, vision--can be distilled into algorithms that bestow silicon minds with a shadow of our cognitive prowess. This month, the prestigious journal Nature published an entire series highlighting the symbiotic growth between neuroscience and AI. It's been a long time coming. At their core, both disciplines are solving the same central problem--intelligence--but coming from different angles, and at different levels of abstraction.


Here's How Artificial Intelligence Is Fueling Climate Change

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The'AI Apocalypse' might kill humanity before any actual robot uprising Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images You can think of artificial intelligence (AI) in the same way you think about cloud computing, if you think about either of them through an environmental lens: an enormous and growing source of carbon emissions, with the very real potential to choke out humans' ability to breathe clean air long before a sentient and ornery AI goes all Skynet on us. At the moment, data centers--the enormous rooms full of stacks and stacks of servers that juggle dank memes, fire tweets, your vitally important Google docs and all the other data that is stored somewhere other than on your phone and in your home computer--use about 2% of the world's electricity. SEE ALSO: Can Giant Snow-Blowing Cannons Save Earth From Climate Change? Of that, servers that run AI--processing all the data and making the decisions and computations that a machine mimicking a human brain must handle in order to achieve "deep learning"--use about 0.1% of the world's electricity, according to a recent MIT Technology Review article. The likelihood that figure will grow, it turns out, is quite good.


Global Big Data Conference

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I become addicted to learning a new language with the Lingvist language software within a day of using it. Census data that shows that 231 million Americans speak only English at home and do not know another language well enough to communicate in it. But how can you learn a new language without going back to school? Machine learning could be a solution to this problem, by cutting down on the 200 hours it takes to learn a language using traditional methods. Language company Lingvist intends to decrease this time by using machine learning software to adapt to your learning style.


SearchChat Podcast: How AI Drives Value for Your Business - SoloSegment

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In this episode Steve Zakur and I are curious about the ways AI can be used to drive greater value for your company. We have our opinions about our own software of course, but this is a bigger question: how can you use AI to make your entire team and business smarter? What companies need to think about right now is AI augmentation -- augmenting decision making. Sometimes we're thinking way too big about AI, instead of in a targeted fashion about what it can do for us now. This is the importance of practical AI.


Could AI guide treatment of brain-injured patients in the ER? - STAT

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A paramedic gurney flies through the trauma bay carrying an unconscious elderly gentleman. He is already intubated and has a hive of doctors and nurses running alongside, placing intravenous lines and injecting medicine into his blood stream. He's suffered a serious head injury in a car accident. It was a cold winter afternoon in 2017, and the patient had been taken to a major regional hospital. When he arrived, the neurosurgeon on call had minutes to counsel the family on the man's prognosis, and together they needed to decide whether to operate; surgery could save the patient's life, but it could also commit him to a life dependent on a ventilator and a feeding tube, trapped in a coma or with limited brain function.


AI can read your emotions. Should it?

The Guardian

It is early July, almost 30C outside, but Mihkel Jäätma is thinking about Christmas. In a co-working space in Soho, the 39-year-old founder and CEO of Realeyes, an "emotion AI" startup which uses eye-tracking and facial expression to analyse mood, scrolls through a list of 20 festive ads from 2018. He settles on The Boy and the Piano, the offering from John Lewis that tells the life story of Elton John backwards, from megastardom to the gift of a piano from his parents as a child, accompanied by his timeless heartstring-puller Your Song. The ad was well received, but Jäätma is clearly unconvinced. He hits play, and the ad starts, but this time two lines – one grey (negative reactions), the other red (positive) – are traced across the action.


British mall tested facial recognition of shoppers

The Japan Times

LONDON – A British mall that scanned shoppers using facial-recognition cameras said on Friday it is no longer using technology that advocacy groups called a threat to privacy. Meadowhall in the northern city of Sheffield, which attracts more than 25 million visitors a year, used the surveillance with police in 2018, according to its owners British Land. "We conducted a short trial at Meadowhall, in conjunction with the police, and all data was deleted immediately after the trial," said spokeswoman Claire Scicluna. She said British Land would change its privacy policy to show "we don't use the technology at our sites" but refused to rule out using facial recognition at a later date. A police spokeswoman said its officers had supported a four-week trial to develop "opportunities associated with the use of this technology."


Yemeni Houthis claim drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – Yemen's Houthi movement launched drone attacks on oil facilities in a remote area of Saudi Arabia, the group's Al Masirah TV said Saturday, but there was no immediate confirmation from Saudi authorities or state oil giant Aramco. A Saudi-led coalition is battling the Iran-aligned Houthis to try to restore Yemen's government, which was ousted from power in the capital, Sanaa, by the group in late 2014. The war has been in military stalemate for years. The Houthis have stepped up cross-border missile and drone attacks on Saudi Arabia in recent months. "Ten drones targeted Aramco's Shaybah oilfield and refinery in the first Operation: Balance of Deterrence in the east of the kingdom," the Al Masirah channel reported, citing a Houthi military spokesman.